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The King's Heralds and the Voice of Prophecy team.

Photo courtesy of Jonatan Conceição.

The Voice of Prophecy - Brazil

By Letícia Daniel Bessa

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Letícia Daniel Bessa

The Voice of Prophecy is a radio and television program of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, broadcast by New Time Radio and New Time TV (Hope Channel Brazil). Its team is comprised of five people: two credential pastors and three licensed workers. It is headquartered at Adventist Media Center--Brazil, located at 5876 General Euryale de Jesus Zerbini highway, ZIP code 12340-010, Jardim São Gabriel neighborhood, in the city of Jacareí, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

Origin

In the book Fundamentals of Christian Education, Ellen G. White, an Adventist church pioneer and cofounder, addresses the multiplicity of evangelization means. As she talks about the development of scientific techniques, she says that “the way in which God uses men is not always discerned, but He does use them. God intrusts men with talents and inventive genius, in order that His great work in our world may be accomplished.”1 White reinforces the idea that human talents and capabilities should be used to expand the advent message.

In 1920, a few years after this book was published, the first radio station started operating in the United States. In the same year, the Adventist Church gained space at a local station. Thereafter the organization realized that it could use the radio media for the expansion of missionary work and, in 1933, the radio started to be used as a means of preaching. That year a young American evangelist named Harold Marshall Sylvester Richards began to present the Bible Tabernacle of the Air program, which was subsequently renamed to Voice of Prophecy. Later the program got a Portuguese version and started to be broadcast in Brazil.2

Organization

To comprise the beginning of the Voice of Prophecy program, it is necessary to understand the origins of this ministry in the North American continent. In 1928 Adventist Church world leaders began planning, within the Missionary Action Department, a strategy to better use radio as a means of evangelization.3 However, this plan was put into practice only in 1933, when Pastor Richards started the Voice of Prophecy program.4

Richards made his first radio broadcast in 1926, on Fresno station, when he announced the evangelistic meetings he was holding. In 1930, after moving to Los Angeles, he gained space on the KNX station to broadcast a daily program, the devotional Family Worship. Although he had already conquered space on the radio, Pastor Richards dreamed of proclaiming the gospel to more people. It was then that, in 1933, he made a bold proposal to the audience that was with him at one of his meetings: the donation of old jewelry in order to finance a new radio program.5

The public responded to the pastor's appeal, who raised $130.00 from the sale of the donated material, enabling the debut of the Bible Tabernacle of the Air program. The first episode of the program was broadcast on April 9, 1933, at 5:30 p.m., on the KGER station, in the city of Long Beach. On that occasion Pastor Richards preached a sermon on the large statue of Daniel 2. In the following year (1934) the program reached three more radio stations, starting to be broadcast, from then on, by the KGER, KTM, KNX, and KFI stations.6 In 1936 the name of the program was changed to Voice of Prophecy. A year later the content was already broadcast by 18 stations and had the collaboration of a musical quartet composed by Luiz Crane, Waldo Crane, Wesley Crane, and Raymond Turner. Originally known as Lone Star Four, the quartet adopted the name The King’s Heralds after Richards held a contest in order to define the name of the group.7

Voice of Prophecy was made official by the Adventist Church North American Division in 1937, making it possible to transmit the message on a national scale. On January 4, 1942, the program began to be broadcast throughout the North American territory by 89 stations on the Mutual Broadcasting System network. At the same time, the Bible School was created to offer Bible courses by correspondence. Even with a short time of operation, in June the demand for the courses was so great that the program team had to call new people to work in the ministry. In July the number of registrations had already exceeded twenty-seven thousand, and in October, when the program started to be broadcast by 225 stations in the country, the number of subscribers reached 60,000.8

History

In 1942, due to the work carried out through radio in the United States, the Adventist Church General Conference began to encourage the use of radio media as a means of evangelization in South America. It was then that the organization adopted the necessary measures to debut A Voz da Profecia, Brazilian version of the Voice of Prophecy program.9 The first step was to make a selection in order to choose the speaker for the program. Pastor Roberto Rabello, a student at Pacific Union College at the time, was called to take a voice test at the headquarters of the radio ministry, in the city of Glendale. Even though he had no experience with radio, he was chosen.10 The Brazilian version of the program would also feature The King’s Heralds quartet.11

By early 1943 Rabello had already recorded 52 programs in the National Broadcasting Company's studio,12 but the program had not yet been released in Brazil due to some deadlocks for the final project's completion. For this reason it was only possible to debut the program in September on broadcasters in Aracaju, Belo Horizonte, São Paulo, Curitiba, Vitória, Rio de Janeiro, and Ribeirão Preto. In early October the program started to be broadcast in Belém, Fortaleza, Santos, Salvador, Recife, and Porto Alegre.13

With the progress of the project, in 1943 the General Conference inaugurated an office in Niterói, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, to function as a branch of the headquarters located in Glendale. In this new location the organization established the Escola Radiopostal (Radio Bible School), which offered Bible courses by correspondence, just like in the United States. In March 1944 about four thousand five hundred people had already enrolled in one of the courses offered by the school.14 In 1945 enrollments reached 7,700, and in the following year, 75,000 people were enrolled. That year (1946) 21 stations were already broadcasting the program A Voz da Profecia (The Voice of Prophecy) in Brazil.15

When the administration of the South American Division saw how the project was developing, in 1952 it put into action a program with the purpose of establishing a Brazilian headquarters for A Voz da Profecia ministry. For this purpose, South American Division purchased a lot in Niterói (where the Radio Bible School was located). However, when South American Division realized that the city of Rio de Janeiro would be a better place to build the headquarters, it was decided to sell the lot. After analyzing about 50 areas, the institution bought some land on Matriz Street, in Botafogo neighborhood. The cornerstone of the new building was laid on July 27, 1960, with the participation of the then president of the Adventist Church for South American Division territory, J. J. Aitken.16

The official inauguration of the building happened on October 21, 1962, with the presentation of the newly formed Brazilian quartet Arautos do Rei (The King’s Heralds). The national version of The King’s Heralds was generally composed of pastors who used their musical gift to advance the preaching of the gospel. The first formation consisted of Henry Feyerabend (first tenor), Luiz Mota (second tenor), Joel Sarli (baritone), and Samuel Campos (bass). The following year (1963) the group replaced The King’s Heralds in A Voz da Profecia ministry. It that same year the new headquarters (location of the current Botafogo Adventist Church) received imported equipment for the studio, which made it possible to start recording in Brazil. The devices used in the program's studio were the most advanced for the time and offered the team less difficulties. In 1964 Rabello had already recorded 26 programs in Brazil.17

In 1963 the quartet Arautos do Rei (The King’s Heralds) and speaker Roberto Rabello began conducting series of meetings throughout Brazil. In 1965 the group was modified when some members left. Only Feyerabend remained in the quartet, starting to perform with new colleagues: the musicians David Rocha (second tenor), Walter Boger (baritone), and Nilo Ramos (bass). In December 1966, Ramos left the quartet and was replaced by Roberto Conrad Filho who later became the speaker of A Voz da Profecia.18

With presentations throughout Brazil and recordings of programs, the ministry A Voz da Profecia had grown and developed. In 1968 the group completed its 25th anniversary and participated in several commemorative events, including one at Ibirapuera Gymnasium, in the city of São Paulo, where a great number of people gathered for the celebration. The quartet underwent new changes that year. This time only Conrad remained in the quartet. He started to sing alongside the musicians Eclair Cruz (first tenor), Malton Braff (second tenor), and Wesley Blevins (baritone). The team also held an event in Campestre Velho, in Rio Grande do Sul, Rabello's hometown. And then the group went to Rio dos Sinos, also in Rio Grande do Sul, where they performed to various civil authorities who accompanied the program, including the mayor and the councilors of the city.19

Arautos do Rei quartet underwent further modifications in 1969, when Blevins left it and ex-baritone Joel Sarli replaced him, until Enis Rockel was called to take up the position in 1970, joining Cruz, Braff, and Conrad. Together, they held several evangelism meetings throughout Brazil, passing through cities like Serra Negra, in São Paulo countryside, where there were no Adventists. This was one of the programs that paid off. During the sermon series, more than two hundred people became interested in the courses offered by Radio Bible School.20

In 10 years of existence, Arautos do Rei quartert had five formations, and in 1972 Melchiades Soares (second tenor) and Wilson Almeida (baritone) started to sing along with Cruz and Conrad. This formation performed 1,100 times, and about thirty-six thousand people enrolled in the courses of Radio Bible School until 1975. With the end of the group's sixth formation, A Voz da Profecia had its official quartet no longer. That is why, in 1976, the program's musical director, Alexandre Reichert, invited several singers to perform voice tests in order to form a new group. After the selection, 16 musicians joined the “Grupo VP” (VP Group), which would perform until 1978. On the other hand, in 1976 Rabello stopped presenting A Voz da Profecia due to his retirement. It was then that Conrad was called to be the new speaker. Although he had retired, Rabello continued to work for the ministry, producing and presenting the program for a while until Conrad took over.21

Arautos do Rei quartet began to perform with a new musical formation in 1979. This time the group was formed by the musicians Josué Moreno Navarrete (first tenor), Ademar Penteado (second tenor), Francisco Gonçalves (baritone), and Conrad.22 This was the first formation of the quartet to perform at a General Conference meeting. The historic performance took place in the state of Texas, in the United States, in 1980. After the meeting the group toured the country for almost two months. The quartet's last performance on North American soil, at that time, took place at Sligo Adventist Church in Washington, where about a thousand people watched the program.23

In 1980 Gonçalves was replaced by Wilson Almeida, who had already been a baritone in the quartet. With the presence of Almeida, the singers participated in “Encontrão 80” (The 1980 Big Meeting), a youth congress that took place at Gilberto Cardoso Gymnasium, the Maracanãzinho, in Rio de Janeiro. On that occasion Pastor Rabello received a tribute for his time as a speaker on A Voz da Profecia program. In addition, Reichert prepared a musical with the participation of Arautos do Rei quartet and Grupo VP. Also in 1980, a selection was made to choose the director-producer for a television program. After the tests Pastor José Irajá da Costa e Silva (responsible for the Curitiba Central Adventist Church at the time) was chosen and admitted to the team in May 1981. In the same month A Voz da Profecia team defined the name of the new program: Encontro Com a Vida (Encounter with Life). The broadcast was supposed to last only five minutes, and the team decided that the Television Department should be located in Curitiba.24

The recordings of the program were initially made in the studios of TV Iguaçu, in Curitiba. Two months after recording began, the program premiered on TV Bandeirantes, in Rio de Janeiro. In the beginning the new production had several presenters, among them Zildomar Deucher and Alcides Campolongo, who dealt with issues such as family, health, and education. In 1981 Arautos do Rei quartet underwent a new change in its formation. That year Sérgio Abbud (baritone) and Ivalter Souza (bass) joined José Navarrete and Ademar Penteado. Another change was made in 1982, when Navarrete was replaced by Osmar Rosa, who started to perform alongside with Penteado, Sérgio Abbud, and Ivalter Souza.25

In 1983 the group welcomed musician Décio Borges (first tenor), and again the singers Ademar Penteado, Sérgio Abbud, and Ivalter Souza remained in the quartet. In the same year, A Voz da Profecia participated in several events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the ministry in Brazil and the historic number of 400 stations broadcasting the program. It was in that same year that Roberto Conrad Filho was chosen as the official presenter of Encontro Com a Vida. Until then the television program was recorded in rented studios, because A Voz da Profecia ministry did not have adequate space. To meet this need, about $100,000 were invested to set up a studio in Curitiba. That happened in 1985.26

Arautos do Rei quartet began to perform with a new formation in 1984. That year Josué de Castro joined the quartet as a second tenor, which was composed of Borges, Abbud, and Souza at the time. In 1985 this formation participated in the Metropolitana Bandeirante campaign, visiting 20 different cities. The goal was to prepare people for the closing of the “Mil Dias de Colheita” (Thousand Harvest Days) - a South American Division initiative to reach the target of 7,500 baptisms. In the same year, Eclair Cruz, a former member of the group, returned to perform with the quartet, replacing Décio Borges; Evaldo Vicente (baritone) replaced Sérgio Abbud; and Erlo Braun (bass) replaced Ivalter Souza. From the previous formation, only Josué de Castro remained in the group.27

At the same time, the Adventist Church created the “Ceifeiros da Voz” (Voice Reapers) project. Many people had followed A Voz da Profecia for years but had not made the decision to study the Bible. Therefore, the objective of this project was to organize groups in order to serve these people interested in learning about the church more effectively through the program. With the project each member turned into a representative of A Voz da Profecia program in order to enroll those who were interested in participating in the Bible courses offered by correspondence by the Radio Bible School and give them support until the end of the studies.28

In 1987 Encontro Com a Vida's studio was inaugurated, starting what later became TV Novo Tempo (Hope Channel Brazil). The inauguration was attended by about thirty people. Within 1981 to 1987, the program had already made 472 recordings, with the participation of 32 speakers and 48 singers. In 1988 the program was being broadcast by 22 TV stations across Brazil. In the same year, Fernando Iglesias was invited to join Arautos do Rei as a baritone, replacing Evaldo Vicente. This formation participated in the group's first video clips recorded in Curitiba, in the studio of Encontro Com a Vida. Still in 1988 A Voz da Profecia team decided to restore Grupo VP, which had participated in the ministry within 1976 and 1978. With the group formed, the singers recorded a musical about the life of Jesus, with the name “Cristo, a Luz” (Christ, the Light). That same year (1988) the album was released through a performance in Curitiba, at Palácio de Cristal, where 1,200 people gathered to watch the program.29

In addition to the mentioned event, Grupo VP made several presentations, including one on Christmas 1989, at the invitation of the Brazilian broadcaster SBT (Sistema Brasileiro de Televisão) (Brazilian Television System). The presentation took place at Praça XV de Novembro, in Florianópolis, to an audience of approximately ten thousand people. Within 1988 and 1989, through its work, Grupo VP reached more than one hundred twenty thousand people and more than a thousand enrollments for the Radio Bible School courses through its many performances. At Maria Betânia Theater, in Salvador, for example, the group had the support of Rede Globo de Televisão (Globo Television Network) and Rádio Bandeirantes (Bandeirantes Radio). Maria Betânia Theater had never been used for activities or presentations by the Adventist Church. There were 600 people inside the place at this event, but more than four thousand stayed outside due to the lack of space30.

In 1990 the program A Voz da Profecia began to be presented by pastor Hélio Carnassale, who replaced Conrad. A year later Arautos do Rei quartet had its 15th formation, with the arrival of Dermival dos Reis. Thus, Reis started to sing alongside with Josué de Castro, Fernando Iglesias, and Erlo Braun. These singers made the first recording on CD of the musical group, which conferred greater quality and durability to the product in relation to the LPs that the other formations had produced. Also in 1991, A Voz da Profecia team started producing a Brazilian version for the North American television program “It Is Written” (Está Escrito). This initiative was supported by the newly formed Federation of Adventist Entrepreneurs (FE), which had plans to put a program of the denomination on national network.31

In November 1991, when it premiered on national television through TV Bandeirantes, Está Escrito was broadcast in dubbed version, with the same presenter for It Is Written, Pastor George Vandeman. The following year (1992) the studio of Encontro Com a Vida program was transferred to Rio de Janeiro. In 1993 A Voz da Profecia and Está Escrito, which worked together until then, started to perform independently. It was also in that year that Pastor Ronaldo de Oliveira began to present A Voz da Profecia program, since Carnassale was called to take over the Está Escrito Bible School (equivalent to the Radio Bible School).32

Also in 1993, Pastor Erlo Braun took over the administration of Está Escrito ministry. From then on Juan Salazar started to be part of Arautos do Rei quartet, alongside with Dermival Reis, Josué de Castro, and Fernando Iglesias, which started the group’s 16th formation. In commemoration to the 50 years of A Voz da Profecia ministry, they recorded a celebration CD and held a series of events to commemorate the program’s anniversary. The first performance took place in Salvador, at Otávio Mangabeira Stadium, within September 1st and 4th. In addition to Arautos and pastors Rabello and Ronaldo de Oliveira, those present were: Pastor Lonnie Melashenko, the Voice of Prophecy speaker at the time; Harold Marshall Sylvester Richards Jr., the son of the North American program founder; The King's Heralds group; and the singer Del Delker.33

After the performance in Salvador, part of the team went to the southern part of Brazil while others went to the north region. Thus, on September 5, 1993, The King’s Heralds quartet performed for more than twelve thousand people alongside with Richards Jr., in Recife, at Geraldo Magalhães Gymnasium (known as Geraldão). On the 7th, the group performed in São Luís, Maranhão, at Governador João Castelo Stadium (known as Castelão), to 18,000 people, 562 of whom decided to be baptized. Although the number was significant, the tour’s largest baptism was in Belém, in the state of Pará, on September 11. The program brought together more than thirty thousand participants at Jornalista Edgar Proença State Stadium (known as Mangueirão), and 1,204 people decided to be baptized. The next day (September 12), the team performed in Manaus, at Amazonas Theater and at Amazonas Convention Center, where 600 people were baptized.34

Meanwhile, the other part of the group performed in the southern region of Brazil. One of the presentations took place in São Leopoldo, in Rio Grande do Sul, at Celso Morbach Municipal Gymnasium, with the participation of Pastor Lonnie Melashenko, Arautos do Rei quartet, and Del Delker. On the occasion, listeners from New Time Radio and other guests followed the program. On September 18, 1993, the two groups met in São Paulo, at Portuguesa Gymnasium, to hold another commemorative event. The occasion featured performances by the Arautos do Rei quartet and The King’s Heralds, alongside with the singer Del Delker. Pastor Rabello also spoke a few words at this event that was broadcast via satellite to the United States, being the first Adventist program to receive a broadcast of such a level.35

Three years later (1996), the Adventist Church contacted Embratel (Brazilian Telecommunications Company) in order to study the possibility of renting a satellite for a few hours a day. The goal was to broadcast a series of meetings directly from Orlando called “NET 96.” Some time after the request, Embratel made the Intelsat 709 satellite available for rent for 24 hours a day. Thus, the church obtained the concession to use a satellite channel for 10 years, with the help of Golden Cross Company, whose Adventist owner (Dr. Milton Soldani Afonso) had the vision of investing in the media to spread the gospel.36

Moreover, in 1996, the entrepreneur responsible for Golden Cross donated a property in Nova Friburgo for the Adventist Church to build the radio and television studios, starting the Adventist Communication System (Sisac). The inauguration of the communication conglomerate happened on November 7, 1996, with the presentation of the newly created Satellite Adventist Television (TV Adsat) and Adsat Radio Network, established in 1995. In this context the headquarters of A Voz da Profecia ministry was transferred to Sisac, as well as Está Escrito. Later, TV Adsat was renamed TV Novo Tempo (Hope Channel Brazil), and Adsat Radio Network, New Time Radio Network. Finally Sisac adopted the name Rede Novo Tempo de Comunicação (Adventist Media Center–Brazil).37

After the inauguration of the new communication system, Pastor Assad Bechara became a speaker at A Voz da Profecia, replacing Pastor Ronaldo de Oliveira. Notwithstanding, Bechara decided to retrieve some programs recorded by Roberto Rabello, who died in August of that year (1996). Thereafter, past programs were reedited to compose new series. By 1997, 102 programs recorded with Rabello's voice had already been used by radio stations. In addition, in 1996, Arautos do Rei quartet was not the only one that performed on the program. Other singers collaborated, who later joined Gravadora Novo Tempo (New Time label).38

Still in 1996, Arautos changed their formation once again, starting the 17th composition of the group. The new members of the quartet were Dênio Abreu (first tenor), Társis Iraídes (second tenor), Jeferson Tavares (baritone), and Ronaldo Fagundes (bass). These musicians recorded several albums, highlighting “Se Ele Não For o Primeiro” (If He Is Not the First) and "Chegou a Hora” (The Time Has Come).39 In 1997 Pastor Neumoel Stina became a speaker at A Voz da Profecia. At that time the program had already been broadcast by 400 national broadcasters and was present on 150 radio stations.40 In 1999, after intense work, 446 radio stations already broadcast A Voz da Profecia, of which 428 were hired and 18 were from New Time Radio Network. Still in 1999, the Arautos do Rei quartet released their first DVD: Eu Não Sou Mais Eu (I'm no Longer Me).41

Later (2001) the group started its 18th formation with the arrival of José Barbalho, and at the end of the year Élson Gollub, and Alan Fernandes. The following year (2002) A Voz da Profecia premiered on TV Bandeirantes. On March 27, 2002, the program reached a thousand radio stations. The thousandth station was Rádio Esperança de Paz (Peace Hope Radio), from Ouro Preto do Oeste, in the state of Rondônia. That same month Arautos do Rei started their 20th formation, when Ronaldo Fagundes joined the group again. Still in 2002, Pastor Montano de Barros became a speaker at A Voz da Profecia.42

In 2003 the ministry completed 60 years, and Arautos do Rei quartet made again a series of presentations throughout Brazil. The group performed about 157 times to an audience estimated at two hundred thousand people. Due to the work carried out that year, in 2004, the Radio Bible School received 17,235 new students. A year later (2005) the quartet started its 21st formation with the arrival of Alexandre Lima (first tenor), Jônatas Ferreira (second tenor), and Milton Andrade (bass). Élson Gollub continued as a baritone. In 2006 this group released the album Aqui é Seu Lugar (Here Is Your Place) at Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho campus (UNASP-EC).43

In addition, in 2006, the Adventist Media Center--Brazil celebrated the conquest of its new complex, located in Jacareí. The move happened in 2005 due to strategic factors such as the location of Jacareí that is near to other Adventist institutions, airports, and suppliers. The inauguration ceremony happened only in 2006 and was attended by Pastor Jan Paulsen, then world president of the Adventist Church. At that time the A Voz da Profecia office, which already operated at the headquarters of the Adventist Media Center--Brazil, in the city of Nova Friburgo, was also transferred to the city of Jacareí. The new place had three TV studios and three radio studios, in addition to smaller audio studios.44

In the following year (2007), pastor Fernando Iglesias, who had already participated in some formations of Arautos do Rei quartet and presented the program Está Escrito, took the place of Pastor Montano de Barros as the ministry speaker. Also in 2007, Arautos do Rei quartet started its 22nd formation with two new members, Everson Fuckner and Felipe Valente. Both started to perform alongside with Elson Gollub and Milton Andrade. In the same year, Jairo Ribeiro replaced Felipe Valente, and in 2008 the group underwent a new change, when Ozéias Reis joined the quartet. Also, in 2008, Társis Iraídes joined the group again.45

In 2010 the group started its 26th formation with pastor Jairo Souza, who started to perform alongside with Ozéias Reis, Társis Iraídes, and Milton Andrade. This formation remained together until 2015, and during that time the quartet released the DVDs “O Dia Enfim Chegou” (The Day Has Finally Arrived) and “Ainda Existe Graça” (There Is Still Grace).46 In addition, Pastor Ivan Saraiva was invited to be the speaker at A Voz da Profecia in 2011. In 2012, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Arautos do Rei quartet, the Adventist Media Center-- Brazil carried out an overproduction to record the group history. On that occasion around ten thousand people gathered in São Paulo at the Ibirapuera Gymnasium to follow the performance of all the quartet's formations.47

At the event, the Arautos gathered to sing songs that marked the quartet's previous formations, such as “Hei de Estar na Alvorada” (I Will Be at Dawn), the theme of the first album released by the group, and “Aqui Chegamos Pela Fé” (We Arrived Here by Faith). In addition, pastors Erton Köhler, president of South American Division, and Antônio Tostes, director of Adventist Media Center--Brazil, paid tribute to the former speakers of A Voz da Profecia, present in the program: Roberto Conrad, Hélio Carnassale, Ronaldo de Oliveira, Neumoel Stina, Assad Bechara, Montano de Barros, and Fernando Iglesias. In addition, pastors and musicians Eclair Cruz, Henry Feyerabend, Walter Boger, Nilo Ramos, and Samuel Campos, now deceased, were also mentioned. The final call was for everyone to get involved in spreading the gospel.48

With the expansion of the media, in 2013, A Voz da Profecia reached more than a thousand Brazilian radio stations.49 Years later, in 2018, Pastor Gilson Brito started presenting the program and, in 2019, it was also broadcast on TV Novo Tempo (Hope Channel Brazil).50 In addition to the speakers and singers, this ministry had the contribution of several pianists in their formations: Robert Benfield, Leni Azevedo, Ênio Monteiro, Genoveva Bergold, Cibele Botelho, Iraci Botelho, Waldemar Wensell, Alexandre Reichert Filho, Eli Prates, Pedro Carvalho, Jader Dornelles Santos, Williams Costa Junior, Flávio Santos, Evaldo Vicente, Kleber Augusto, Silmar Correia, and Ricardo Martins.51

Since its beginning, this ministry has faced several challenges, and the biggest one was maintaining the formations of Arautos do Rei quartet. The group changed its members several times over the years, and with each new change, this difficulty repeated. Among the reasons that contribute to these changes, the fact that many of the members had small children and the challenge of reconciling the travels of the group with other important responsibilities of ministerial life was great. Furthermore, there were not many resources to make the trips with all members of the ministry--singers, speakers, and technical staff. Sometimes the team would start a trip without money to return and needed to sell K7 disks and tapes. It was also necessary to obtain resources to maintain the Radio Bible School. However, despite the challenges, A Voz da Profecia has grown and consolidated.52

Throughout its history this ministry demonstrates that its pioneers really played an extremely important role in the development of the work. A Voz da Profecia was the beginning of the entire media conglomerate that exists today in Jacareí. All this because the pioneers believed in this project, worked, fought, and overcame obstacles. Therefore, today we must look to the future and work with the same dedication and commitment as before. “The fact that we have good conditions today cannot make us give up the spirit of pioneers and sacrifice that was present in the lives of our pioneers.”53

Role and Space in the World Church and its Mission

Since its beginnings the work of A Voz da Profecia ministry has reached and continues to reach several people. In 1944 the former office of the program in Niterói (where the Radio Bible School operated) had already received more than twenty thousand letters from people interested in studying the Bible. In 1946 the letters already exceeded half a million, which represented an average of 14,000 letters received per month. Moreover, by 1946, 75,000 people had already been enrolled in the various courses offered by the school. Later, in January 1949, the number of enrollments climbed to around seventy thousand. This picture reveals only the effects of the ministry in its early years. However, it is known that these results have increased over time.54

Among the stories of lives marked by the program A Voz da Profecia, the conversion of José Rozendo dos Santos stands out. In the early 1970s, Santos' family lived in Ivaiporã, Paraná, where he discovered the program while handling his radio. After the discovery he, his wife, and children began to listen to the messages announced by Pastor Roberto Rabello every day. When the news that José was a frequent listener of A Voz da Profecia spread, some members of the Adventist Church in the city of Borrazópolis, Paraná, came to his home and created a Sabbath School Branch.55 From then on the whole family began to keep the Sabbath.56

After studying the Bible for three years, Santos, his wife, and four of his children decided to be baptized in September 1973. As a result of their decision, they had to deal with opposition from family members who did not agree with the new faith they professed. Even with the difficulties, the family remained convinced of their beliefs. Later the whole family moved to Borrazópolis and started attending an Adventist church. There the two youngest sons of Santos, who had not yet been baptized, finally made this important decision. Many years later one of Santos' sons, Loide, decided to convey to his children the faith of his family, perpetuating the evangelistic legacy of A Voz da Profecia program, as well as of Arautos do Rei quartet.57

One of the plans for the future is to consolidate the program A Voz da Profecia on TV. The ministry team wants to reach new generations, as well. “We will unite and work towards this [consolidate the program], for the VP to remain strong on the radio, consolidate on TV and start reaching new generations with Arautos do Rei quartet and the message from the speaker.” In addition, efforts are being made to improve the actions of the ministry through the Internet, so that more people have contact with the gospel message on all communication fronts and this ministry can fulfill its mission of announcing the good news to everyone.58

List of Speakers

Roberto Rabello (1943--1976); Roberto Conrad Filho (1976--1990); Hélio Carnassale (1990--1992); Ronaldo de Oliveira (1993--1995); Assad Bechara (1996); Neumoel Stina (1997--2002); Montano de Barros (2003--2006); Fernando Iglesias (2007--2011); Ivan Saraiva (2011--2018); Gilson Brito (2019—Present time).

Arautos Do Rei Quartet

First formation (1963 to 1965): Henry Feyerabend, first tenor; Luiz Mota, second tenor; Joel Sarli, baritone; and Samuel Campos, bass.

Second formation (1965 to 1966): Henry Feyerabend, first tenor; David Rocha, second tenor, Walter Boger, baritone; and Nilo Ramos, bass.

Third formation (1967 to 1968): Henry Feyerabend, first tenor; David Rocha, second tenor, Walter Boger, baritone; and Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Fourth formation (1968 to 1969): Eclair Cruz, first tenor; Malton Braff, second tenor; Wesley Blevins, baritone; and Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Fifth formation (1970 to 1971): Eclair Cruz, first tenor; Malton Braff, second tenor; Enis Rockel, baritone; and Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Sixth formation (1972 to 1975): Eclair Cruz, first tenor; Melchiades Soares, second tenor; Wilson Almeida, baritone; and Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Seventh formation (1979 to 1980): Josué Moreno Navarrete, first tenor; Ademar Penteado, second tenor; Francisco Gonçalves, baritone; Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Eighth formation (1980): Josué Moreno Navarrete, first tenor; Ademar Penteado, second tenor; Wilson Almeida, baritone; Roberto Conrad Filho, bass.

Ninth formation (1981): Josué Navarrete, first tenor; Ademar Penteado, second tenor; Sérgio Abbud, baritone; Ivalter Souza, bass.

Tenth formation (1982): Osmar Rosa, first tenor; Ademar Penteado, second tenor; Sérgio Abbud, baritone; Ivalter Souza, bass.

Eleventh formation (1983): Décio Borges, first tenor; Ademar Penteado, second tenor; Sérgio Abbud, baritone; Ivalter Souza, bass.

Twelvth formation (1984): Décio Borges, first tenor; Josué de Castro, second tenor; Sérgio Abbud, baritone; Ivalter Souza, bass.

Thirteenth formation (1985 to 1987): Eclair Cruz, first tenor; Josué de Castro, second tenor; Evaldo Vicente, baritone; Erlo Braun, bass.

Fourteenth formation (1988 to 1990): Eclair Cruz, first tenor; Josué de Castro, second tenor; Fernando Iglesias, baritone; Erlo Braun, bass.

Fifteenth formation (1991 to 1992): Dermival dos Reis, first tenor; Josué de Castro, second tenor; Fernando Iglesias, baritone; Erlo Braun, bass.

Sixteenth formation (1993 to 1995): Dermival dos Reis, first tenor; Josué de Castro, second tenor; Fernando Iglesias, baritone; Juan Salazar, bass.

Seventeenth formation (1996 to 2001): Dênio Abreu, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Jeferson Tavares, baritone; Ronaldo Fagundes, bass.

Eighteenth formation (2001): José Barbalho, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Jeferson Tavares, baritone; Ronaldo Fagundes, bass.

Nineteenth formation (2001 to 2002): José Barbalho, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Alan Fernandes, bass.

Twentieth formation (2002 to 2005): José Barbalho, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Ronaldo Fagundes, bass.

Twenty-first formation (2005 to 2006): Alexandre Lima, first tenor; Jônatas Ferreira, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-second formation (2007): Everson Fuckner, first tenor; Felipe Valente, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-third formation (2007 to 2008): Everson Fuckner, first tenor; Jairo Ribeiro, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-fourth formation (2008): Ozéias Reis, first tenor; Jairo Ribeiro, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-fifth formation (2008 to 2009): Ozéias Reis, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Élson Gollub, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-sixth formation (2010 to 2015): Ozéias Reis, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Jairo Souza, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-seventh formation (2015 to 2017): Fernando Santos, first tenor; Társis Iraídes, second tenor; Denis Versiani, baritone; Milton Andrade, bass.

Twenty-eighth formation (2018--Present): Fernando Santos, first tenor; Fernando Menezes, second tenor; Denis Versiani, baritone; Robson Rocha, bass.59

Sources

“A Voz da Profecia irradiada na América do Sul” [A Voz da Profecia radiated in South America]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1943.

“A Voz da Profecia na tevê, no ar e no coração” [The Voice of Prophecy on TV, in the air and heart]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1998.

“A Voz da Profecia” [The Voice of Prophecy]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1943.

Adventistas Sul Paranaense [South Parana Adventists]. “#16 - Escola Sabatina Filial - Pr. Clemente” [#16 Sabbath School Branch - Pr. Clemente] (video). Presentation video, Sabbath School Branch, Clemente Ramos, April 8, 2019. Accessed on January 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/2t6I5jI.

Conceição, Jonatan. Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet]. Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014.

Figuhr, R.R. “Mensagem pelo ar” [Message over the air]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1942.

Figuhr, R.R. “O rádio na Divisão Sul-Americana” [Radio in South American Division]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1943.

Gomes, Márcio Basso e Wendel Lima. “Aqui chegamos pela fé” [We arrived here by faith]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 2012.

Lindbeck, Lylon H. “A ofensiva aérea na América do Sul” [The air offensive in South America]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1943.

Lindbeck, Lylon H. “O progresso de nossas irradiações” [The progress of our irradiations], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1944.

Oliveira, Marcelo Ferreira de. “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil]. Monograph, Brazil College, 1992.

Silva, Thays. “Pastor Gilson Brito é o novo orador de A Voz da Profecia” [Pastor Gilson Brito is the new speaker for A Voz da Profecia], Adventist News, February 15, 2019.

White, Ellen. Fundamentos da Educação Cristã [Fundamentals of Christian Education]. Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1996.

Notes

  1. Ellen White, Fundamentos da Educação Cristã [Fundamentals of Christian Education] (Tatuí, SP: Brazilian Publishing House, 1996), 409.

  2. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 13-17, 32-34.

  3. Ibid., 14.

  4. Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 4.

  5. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 14-16.

  6. Ibid., 16-17.

  7. Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 7-8.

  8. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 18, 21-23.

  9. R.R. Figuhr, “Mensagem pelo ar” [Message over the air], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1942, 5.

  10. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 30-31.

  11. Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 10-11.

  12. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 32.

  13. “A Voz da Profecia” [The Voice of Prophecy], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1943, 32.

  14. Lylon H. Lindbeck, “O progresso de nossas irradiações” [The progress of our irradiations], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1944, 7.

  15. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 39, 43.

  16. Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 11-13; Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 53.

  17. Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 13-15, 19, 20.

  18. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 63, 77-80.

  19. Ibid., 81-85.

  20. Ibid., 90-92.

  21. Ibid., 95, 96, 102-106.

  22. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 106; Marcelo Ferreira de Oliveira, “A Voz da Profecia no Brasil” [Voice of Prophecy in Brazil] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1992), 22-23.

  23. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 106-108.

  24. Ibid., 106-108, 109, 115, 116.

  25. Ibid, 110, 116.

  26. Ibid., 110, 116,117.

  27. Ibid., 123-125.

  28. Ibid., 125-126.

  29. Ibid., 117, 118, 126, 127, 132-134.

  30. Ibid., 127-128.

  31. Ibid., 122, 137-141.

  32. Ibid., 140-142, 146-148.

  33. Ibid., 149-151.

  34. Ibid., 151-152.

  35. Ibid., 152-153.

  36. Ibid., 163-164.

  37. Ibid., 165, 173-174.

  38. Ibid., 170, 180-183.

  39. Ibid., 182-185.

  40. “A Voz da Profecia na tevê, no ar e no coração” [The Voice of Prophecy on TV, in the air and heart], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 1998, 5-6.

  41. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 188-191.

  42. Ibid., 192-194, 197, 202.

  43. Ibid., 209, 213-214.

  44. Ibid., 222-223.

  45. Ibid., 225-227, 233, 237, 240.

  46. Ibid., 253-254.

  47. Ibid., 256, 264.

  48. Ibid., 265-267.

  49. Ibid., 256.

  50. Thays Silva, “Pastor Gilson Brito é o novo orador de A Voz da Profecia” [Pastor Gilson Brito is the new speaker for A Voz da Profecia], Adventist News, February 15, 2019, accessed on November 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Sedo4J.

  51. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 279-286.

  52. Wagner Cantori (Content Director of Adventist Media Center - Brazil), email message to Carlos Flávio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 14, 2019.

  53. Ibid.

  54. Jonatan Conceição, Fé, coragem e vidas transformadas: conheça a história de A Voz da Profecia e do Quarteto Arautos do Rei [Faith, courage and transformed lives: discover the story of The Voice of Prophecy and Arautos do Rei quartet] (Nova Friburgo, RJ: Author Edition, 2014), 40.

  55. “The Sabbath School Branch consists of a Sabbath School class that operates in a region, city or neighborhood that doesn’t have an Adventist presence. In this place, members of this class develop social, community and missionary work. Its main purpose is to carry the Adventist message to places not yet reached.” Adventistas Sul Paranaense [South Parana Adventists], “#16 - Escola Sabatina Filial - Pr. Clemente” [#16 Sabbath School Branch - Pr. Clemente] (presentation video, Sabbath School Branch, pastor Clemente Ramos, April 8, 2019), accessed on January 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/2t6I5jI.

  56. Márcio Basso Gomes and Wendel Lima, “Aqui chegamos pela fé” [We arrived here by faith], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 2012, 8.

  57. Ibid., 8-9.

  58. Wagner Cantori (Content Director of Adventist Media Center - Brazil), email message to Carlos Flávio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 14, 2019.

  59. For more information about A Voz da Profecia access the website https://www.novotempo.com/programa/a-voz-da-profecia/, or the social media - Facebook and Instagram: @avozdaprofeciant.

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Bessa, Letícia Daniel. "The Voice of Prophecy - Brazil." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed June 18, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AI9O.

Bessa, Letícia Daniel. "The Voice of Prophecy - Brazil." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access June 18, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AI9O.

Bessa, Letícia Daniel (2021, April 28). The Voice of Prophecy - Brazil. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved June 18, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AI9O.