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Current North Rio Grande do Sul Conference headquarters.

Photo courtesy of North Rio Grande do Sul Conference Archives, accessed on May 21, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XxewTV.

North Rio Grande Do Sul Conference

By Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena, and Renato Gross

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Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena

Renato Gross

First Published: January 8, 2022

North Rio Grande do Sul Conference (Associação Norte Sul Rio-Grandense, ANSR) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and part of the South Brazil Union Conference (União Sul-Brasileira, USB). Its headquarters is on Pedro Adams Filho Ave., 3224, Zip Code 93410-038, in Pátria Nova neighborhood, in the city of Novo Hamburgo, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Territory and Statistics

The ANSR comprises the north and northeast regions of the state of Rio Grande do Sul and the Vale dos Sinos (Bell’s Valley) in the same state. In 2019, there were 207 municipalities and an estimated population of 3,095,181 inhabitants in this territory. The Adventist Church was present in 85 of the municipalities in that region and serves 21,220 members and 247 congregations, of which 146 are churches and 101 groups. The average in 2019 was one Adventist per 146 inhabitants. The ANSR congregations are organized in 38 pastoral districts in order to serve members and advance the Adventist work in the best possible way.1

Seven Adventist schools exist on the ANSR territory: 1) Alvorada Adventist School (Escola Adventista de Alvorada), in the city of Alvorada, with 778 students; 2) Canudos Adventist School (Escola Adventista de Canudos), in Novo Hamburgo, with 410 students; 3) Erechim Adventist School (Escola Adventista de Erechim), with 181 students; 4) Esteio Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Esteio), in Esteio, with 820 students; 5) Gravatai Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Gravataí), in Gravataí, with 1766 students; 6) Novo Hamburgo Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Novo Hamburgo), in Novo Hamburgo, with 522 students; and 7) Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist College (Instituto Adventista Cruzeiro do Sul, IACS), in Taquara, with 1427 students. In 2020, altogether, 5,904 students were served by the Adventist education network in this region of Brazil.2

TV Novo Tempo (Adventist Media Center – Brazil) operates in the North Rio Grande do Sul Conference territory as a strong ally in the preaching of the gospel. The TV programs are broadcasted in the cities of Erechim, Ronda Alta, Três Coroas, Passo Fundo, Carazinho, and Novo Hamburgo. An estimated nearly one million people in these six cities are reached with the Adventist message through the TV Novo Tempo.3

In 2020, the ANSR had a total of 112 employees. Of these, 57 are pastors.4

The Origin of the Adventist Work in the Conference Territory

The history of the Adventist work in the territory of the North Rio Grande do Sul Conference began in the early 1890s when Adventism reached Brazil. Guilherme Frederico Kümpel, a German Adventist who immigrated to this part of Brazil in 1895, is considered this region’s early Adventist pioneer. Soon after his arrival, a small wooden chapel was built in a place called Não-Me-Toque, in the municipality of Lagoa dos Três Cantos. In 1898, a school was also established in that place. Until this day, that region is popularly known as “Boa Vista do Guilherme” (Guilherme’s Good view). The ANSR headquarters is currently located in Novo Hamburgo, some 280 km from Não-Me-Toque.5

In the mid-1890s, an entire Baptist community was converted to Adventism in Ijuí, some 130 km from Não-Me-Toque.6 In November 1897, the pioneer pastor Huldreich Ferdinand Graf established an Adventist Church in Ijuí. That church was the first organized Adventist Church in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. A month later, the second Adventist church was established in Santa Cruz do Sul. In the following year (1898), Pastor Graf baptized 41 people in Passo Fundo, and in October of that same year, a church was organized in Não-Me-Toque. Thus, the first and third Adventist churches organized in the state of Rio Grande do Sul are currently located in the territory of the North Rio Grande do Sul Conference.7

From then on, the Adventist message spread quickly in that region. In 1904, to accommodate the needs of the growing Adventist community, the Adventist leaders decided to organize an administrative unit that is currently known as Rio Grande do Sul Conference (Associação Sul Rio-Grandense, ASR). The newly established conference’s headquarters was on the farm where the then Taquary Training School (Colégio Missionário) was previously established,8 in the municipality of Taquari, in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. As both the conference’s headquarters and the school were on the same property, the conference was established under the name of School Society of the Seventh-day Adventists in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (Sociedade Escolar dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia do estado do Rio Grande do Sul).9

In 1913, the conference’s headquarters was moved from Taquari to Porto Alegre and the Adventist school in Taquari was closed. In meantime, the Adventist work was advancing in the north of the state. In 1915, small groups of Adventists were established in Novo Hamburgo, Erechim, Taquara, and São Leopoldo.10 In 1920, Pastor Augusto Rockel organized two congregations in the region of Palmeira das Missões.11 Another milestone for the Adventist work in that territory came in 1927 when the Adventist church was organized in Erechim, which about two years later had 53 members.12

The late 1920s witnessed great advance of the Adventist work in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. In 1927, Pastor Abraham Classen Harder conducted a series of Bible conferences in the city of Taquara, where several Adventist families, including the famous Adventist family Bergold, already resided. Pastor Harder shared the message in German because there was a large community of Teutonic origin in that city. Harder had the support of the German pastors Otto Keppke, Siegfried Hoffmann, and Huldreich F. Graf. The series started on December 7, 1927 and around 400 people attended the meetings daily.13 In the following year, Pastor Harder purchased with his own resources a farm in Taquara that belonged to the Bergolds. There, together with his wife Mary, he established a boarding school Taquara Academy (Colégio Cruzeiro do Sul), currently known as Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist College (Instituto Adventista Cruzeiro do Sul, IACS). In its early years, the school was not run by the Church, but all of its teachers were Adventists.14

During the 1930s, the Adventist education thrived in that region. In addition to Taquara Academy, which offered elementary and high school education, there were also Adventist primary schools in the municipalities of Ijuí and Esteio. In 1937, the Esteio school, then led by Professor Lucy Scheffel, already served 35 children, 29 of whom were children from non-Adventist families.15 In that same year, the Ijuí school was already considered a benchmark school for Adventists in Rio Grande do Sul and for the South Brazil Union Conference because of its infrastructure.16

During the following decade, the Adventist message advanced in other places of Rio Grande do Sul. For example, in Passo Fundo, in 1942, Pastor Araceli Melo and Eugênio Weidle held a series of Bible conferences for six weeks. As a result, at the end of the series, around 50 people became interested in the Adventist message.17 Visits and Bible studies continued after the series and a Sabbath School was established with more than 80 members in Passo Fundo. Later, another 12 people were baptized.18 The Adventists of Passo Fundo initially met in rented halls and later, in 1950, the cornerstone of the new church building was laid. The construction works lasted two years, and the Passo Fundo Adventist temple was inaugurated on September 20, 1952.19

In the following years, the Adventism was consolidated in other municipalities, such as Novo Hamburgo. Although that city already had had a small group of Adventists since the 1910s, the Adventist work did not progress significantly there until about 40 years later. In 1953, Antônio José Francisco and his family, who were Adventists, settled in the countryside of Novo Hamburgo, in the Canudos neighborhood. Antônio began to preach about the return of Christ to his neighbors and to other people in the community. It did not take long before the first people interested in the Adventist message appeared. As a result of the work of that Adventist pioneer, in 1956, there was already a group of 93 people who met every Sabbath to worship God.20

On April 9, 1960, Pastor Enoch de Oliveira, assisted by a group of Bible workers, began a series of conferences in Petrópolis neighborhood, which was considered an upper middle class community in Novo Hamburgo.21 The series of Bible conferences resulted in the establishment of a new Adventist congregation in that neighborhood. As a result of Pastor Enoch series the enrollment at the Novo Hamburgo church Sabbath School increased from 93 to 160 participants.22 On December 26, 1964, the Petrópolis Adventist church building was inaugurated, the then largest Adventist church building in the state of Rio Grande do Sul.23

Pastor Arno Köhler held a new series of Bible conferences in the Novo Hamburgo region in September 1966. The efforts were focused this time on Canudos neighborhood. The series was carried out in partnership with Radio School (Escola Radiopostal)24 that broadcasted the “The Voice of the Prophecy” program.25 For two Sabbath, the Adventist members of Novo Hamburgo distributed invitations in the neighborhood of Canudos to join the program at Radio School. On the third Sabbath, 200 people were registered for the Bible course at Radio School. Pastor Köhler’s Bible series began a month later. And as a result of these evangelistic initiatives, a new Adventist congregation was established in the city of Novo Hamburgo.26

Adventist groups were established in the tourist city of Gramado. In 1968, the Rio Grande do Sul Conference administrators visited the city to find land for the construction of the Adventist church.27 Establishment of new congregations contributed to the successful growth of the Adventist work in Rio Grande do Sul. In 1970, there were already 20 pastoral districts in that state, including cities like Novo Hamburgo, Taquara, Passo Fundo and the district of Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist College.28 Just in the city of Taquara, for example, there were already four Adventist churches, in addition to the Taquara Academy’s congregation.29

During the 1970s, one of the most prominent missionary fronts was The Voice of Prophecy program (A Voz da Profecia). People who were invited to listen to the program were also invited to enroll in the Radio School free Bible course. The Voice of the Prophecy directors in conferences and missions visited the interested Radio School participants and invited the community to watch the series of Bible studies. That was a successful method of sharing the gospel. For example, a series of Bible conferences was successfully held in Alvorada and Gramado that still did not have Adventist presence.30 Efforts were made to also reach the cities that still had only a few Adventist members, such as Gravataí.31 During 1976 and 1977, Pastor Wilmar Borba held a series of Bible conferences in Gravataí that resulted in several baptisms and the establishment of an Adventist congregation with 75 members in that city.32 In September 1978, another series was held in the municipalities of Vacaria and Sapiranga.33 Another city reached by the Adventist message at that time was Igrejinha, which was considered a strong Lutheran refuge, located 14 kilometers from Taquara. In that city, the evangelistic work was developed by the Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist College students who, every Sabbath, went to that region to distribute Adventist leaflets and offer Bible studies.34

In 1980, another municipality reached by the Adventist message preaching was Parobé, located around nine kilometers from Taquara. There, the Adventist work began through the involvement of the Taquara church members with students and teachers of Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist College. Over time, contacts with those interested to know the Adventist message were made, and a small Adventist congregation was established in Parobé.35

In late 1981, an Adventist church was inaugurated in the city of Sapucaia do Sul. Until that year, that was the only city in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region without Adventist presence. One of the tools used for the evangelization of that city was the How to Quit Smoking program,36 taught by the doctors Lutero Renck, Elias Morshe, and Jair Oliveira. After the health program, Pastor Aldrovando Araújo held a series of Bible conferences, with an average attendance of 400 people every day.37 Soon an Adventist church was inaugurated in the Porto Alegre with around160 people enrolled in the Sabbath School and 110 baptized members.38

Lay members have always carried the Adventist message to new places. For example, in October 1981, Carlos and Euclides Sá and Amilton Menezes, members of the Miraguaí Church, started broadcasting a radio program called “A Voz da Mocidade” (The Youth’s Voice). The program was broadcasted on the municipality of Tenente Portela radio and reached listeners in both Rio Grande do Sul and the state of Santa Catarina and even in Argentina. The program included songs, Bible trivia, and lessons from the Bible course called “Encontro com a Vida” (Encounter with Life). Still in its first year of activities, “A Voz da Mocidade” (The Youth’s Voice) yielded good results, including the baptism of 17 new members.39 Realizing the success obtained through the radio program, Amilton Menezes established the Maranata Network of Radio Programs (Rede Maranata de Programas de Rádio) in 1985 that included the Adventists youth in the region.40

The Adventist education was another missionary front that contributed to the rapid growth of the Church in the 1980s. For example, in February 1987, the new building of the Novo Hamburgo Seventh-day Adventist School (Escola Adventista de Novo Hamburgo), currently named as Novo Hamburgo Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Novo Hamburgo) was inaugurated. The building had been under construction since 1981 and, when it was inaugurated, was considered “the most beautiful among the school buildings in the city.”41 In 1987, the state of Rio Grande do Sul had 33 Adventist schools, 11 of which offered elementary education.42

In November 1989, the Rio Grande do Sul Conference held its 36th Triennial Assembly in the city of Santa Maria. In that year, the Rio Grande do Sul Conference had 32,500 Adventist members and 285 congregations. However, at least 187 municipalities in the countryside of the state, mainly in the north and northwest, still did not have an Adventist presence. Even so, the Adventist Church was steadily growing. Due to the distance of the countryside of the state to the capital Porto Alegre (where the Conference’s headquarters was located), the establishment of a new administrative unit was necessary to manage the work in another part of the state. At the 36th Assembly of the Rio Grande do Sul Conference, the delegates voted to request the South Brazil Union Conference and the South American Division to consider reorganizing the Rio Grande do Sul mission field.43

The 1990s began with a strong emphasis on Global Mission44 in Rio Grande do Sul. Several cities and neighborhoods in large cities were reached by the Adventist message. In Novo Hamburgo, for example, in 1992, 100 people were baptized in the Santo Afonso neighborhood, in the city’s South Zone, where there was no Adventist presence until then, and a church was established there. The neighborhood of Vila Vistal, in the pastoral district of Canudos, in Novo Hamburgo, was also evangelized during the same evangelistic campaign in 1992 and a congregation of around 150 people was established there, meeting in a rented hall.45

In 1992, the Rio Grande do Sul Conference purchased a radio station in the city of Sapiranga. Due to its privileged location, the radio could reach a vast area, including the cities closest to Porto Alegre.46 In November 1993, the city of Palmeira das Missões started to host Palmeira das Missões Adventist Children’s Home (Lar Adventista Infantil de Palmeira das Missões]. That Children’s Home operated under the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International.47 The Home was operated by the Church until 2014, when it came under the jurisdiction of the municipality of Palmeira das Missões.48

The 1990s were also marked by several advances in the area of Adventist education. On June 26, 1994, for example, Esteio Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Esteio) new building inauguration took place, which at that time served a total of 820 elementary and high school students. Since then, this school, established in 1929, has an area of 2,500 m² and has classrooms, libraries, administrative rooms, multi-sport gymnasiums, an auditorium, and a music conservatory. With that new structure, Esteio Adventist Academy was at the time, the largest school in the field Rio Grande do Sul Conference.49

The Conference Organizational History

The various inaugurations of churches, schools, and other Adventist institutions in the state of Rio Grande do Sul provided evidence of the successful growth of the Adventist Church in that part of Brazil. In 1993, the field reached the mark of 33,708 members,50 number that increased to 34,841 members in 1994.51 By the end of 1995, there were 35,806 Adventists in the region. However, the Church growth was concentrated in certain regions of the state and there were many municipalities in Rio Grande do Sul without Adventist presence. This made the need to create a new administrative unit in that state urgent.52

During the 38th Triennial Assembly of the Rio Grande do Sul Conference between December 20 and 23, 1995, Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission (Missão Ocidental Sul Rio-Grandense, MOSR) was created in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Pastors José Elias Zanotelli and Wilson Hanelt were elected president and secretary-treasurer of the new mission.53 Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission was officially established on February 26, 1996.

At the beginning of the work of this new administrative unit, there were 7,657 Adventists in its territory, gathered in 92 congregations, organized in 13 pastoral districts. In that region, 33 evangelist canvassers worked,54 and there were 14 Pathfinder clubs,55 and 904 students in the Adventist schools. At that time, the Adventist Church was already present in 179 cities. The first headquarters of the new Mission was on Benjamin Constant street, 790, downtown neighborhood of the municipality of Ijuí.56

Since its establishment, the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission has been fully engaged in the Adventist mission, especially with the initiatives to reach cities and neighborhoods where there was no Adventist presence. In 1996, one of the projects to reach cities was “Missão Global 2000” (Global Mission 2000) that involved each district pastor and his team. Through this project, several cities without an Adventist presence were reached, including, for example, the municipalities of Crissiumal, Santa Maria, Santa Rosa, Guarani das Missões, and Alegrete. The evangelistic work was led by the congregations and the Mission helped with leaflets, invitations, posters, Bibles, Bible courses, and multimedia equipment.57 In 1996, plans were made for at least 74 cities to be reached by the Church by 2000.58

The results of these campaigns began to bear the first fruits in the following year (1997) when the Mission reported that 807 people were baptized by the end of 1996. Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission leaders have also focused on other evangelistic fronts, including Adventist education. For example, in 1997, the construction of the new building for Erechim Adventist School was already in progress.59

In 2005, the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission headquarters was transferred to Barão do Rio Branco St., 489, downtown of Ijuí. At that time, the Mission had 8,918 members and 35 organized churches.60 On April 2, 2006, more than 600 people from the 19 regions that comprised Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission filled the Municipal Theater of the city of Santo Ângelo to participate in a program called “Reencontro” (Reunion).61 The believers, who participated in the 40-day spiritual journey of dawn prayer (from February to April), gathered together for praise and testimonies. That initiative helped to further strengthen the Church in its mission to preach the gospel and, in that same year, two new churches were established, in the neighborhoods of Alto da Boa Vista and Jóquei, in the city of Santa Maria.62

In 2006, the Mission’s leadership also promoted a project entitled “PODER” (Power) that was designed to encourage the Adventists in the region to become more involved in evangelism. The project’s name referred to five different initiatives: Small Groups,63 Intercessory Prayer, Missionary Pairs, Public Evangelism, and Bible Class Meetings.64 In addition to this project, during the 2000s, the Missionary School (Escola Missionária) program was promoted as part of the PODER project. This program began to be put into practice in 2009, with the participation of 1,000 lay members, including 600 Bible instructors and 400 Small Group leaders.65 Over the decade, initiatives as those yielded their fruits, and so the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission had 10,015 members in the early 2010.66

In November 2012, the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission headquarters were moved to São Cristóvão St., 618, in the Hammarston neighborhood, in Ijuí.67 To accommodate the growth of the Adventist Church in the region, on August 27, 2017, the South Brazil Union Conference steering committee voted the proposal to reorganize the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission and sent it to the South American Division. The division approved the proposal during its Annual Council on November 3-7, 2017.68

The reorganization allowed the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission to start serving the municipalities in the north and northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, as well as the Vale do Sinos region. The mission’s name was changed to North Rio Grande do Sul Mission (Missão Norte Sul Rio-Grandense) on May 4, 2018.69 The administrative headquarters was moved to Pedro Adams Filho street, 3224, Pátria Nova neighborhood, in the city of Novo Hamburgo.70

Despite the administrative changes, the Mission maintained its focus on preaching the gospel. In 2018, the Adventist message was preached on more than 700 locations during the Holy Week. The same year, during the Impacto Esperança (Hope Impact) project,71 more than 328 thousand missionary books were distributed free of charge.72 Besides that, the Caravana da Esperança (Caravan of Hope)73 passed through four cities Alvorada, Gravataí, Passo Fundo, and Taquara, attracting thousands of people to listen to the truths of the gospel.74

In addition to evangelistic campaigns, the Mission holds other community-based programs. In April 2019, for example, it inaugurated the “Espaço Vida e Saúde” (Life and Health Center) center of influence with the goal of providing the community with physical, mental and spiritual health care. The center is located on Bento Gonçalves St., 1426, in Novo Hamburgo, and offers services such as massage therapy, Pilates, and family therapy. In this center of influence, training courses are also offered in several areas, such as the Brazilian Sign Language (Libras) classes, music therapy, healthy cooking classes, and English language classes.75

The Mission has strong Adventurers76 and Pathfinders clubs for children and youth of the Church to guide them in service to God.77 Between June 14 and 16, 2019, the “Instacamp” - a Campori78 done on Instagram - was done with the theme “Conectados com Cristo” (Connected with Christ). 36 Club leaders and 71 Pathfinders participated.79

In April 2019, the Mission’s leadership laid the foundation stone for a new administrative headquarters on the street corner between 5 de Abril and 25 de Julho Sts., 46, in the city of Novo Hamburgo. The new headquarters and other plans seek to meet the growing demands of the Adventist work in the region. On November 24, 2019, during the first Quadrennial Assembly of the North Rio Grande do Sul Mission, the Mission received conference status along with a new name – North Rio Grande do Sul Conference (Associação Norte-Sul-Rio-Grandense).80

North Rio Grande do Sul Conference’s plans for the future include reaching many municipalities in its territory still without an Adventist presence, expanding the work in the most populous countryside cities with small Adventist presence, and consolidating the work across the region. In addition, plans for the coming years also involve building projects, among them the conclusion of the renovations of Alvorada and Esteio school, the starting of the construction of the new facilities of Novo Hamburgo Adventist Academy, and the completion of the new Conference administrative headquarters. The North Rio Grande do Sul Conference remains firm to its commitment of “leading the Church to act in accordance with the will of God.”81

Chronology of Administrative Leaders82

Presidents: José Elias Zanotelli (1996-2000); Ênio dos Santos (2000-2004); Moisés Mattos (2004-2006); Ilson Arlei Geisler (2006-2010); Elieser Canto Vargas (2010-present).

Secretaries: Wilson Hanelt (1996-1997); Demir Dener di Berardino (1998-2002); Jose Pinto Garcia (2003-2005); Valdilho Quadrado (2006); Jose Pinto Garcia (2007-2008); Sandro Rogerio Fagundes (2009); Valdilho Quadrado (2010); Derli Agostin (2011); Alex Oliveira Palmeira (2012); Elieser Ramos (2013-2019); Walter Teixeira de Lima (2019-present).

Treasurers: Wilson Hanelt (1996-1997); Demir Dener di Berardino (1998-2002); Iva Batista de Souza (2003-2005); Marlon de Souza Lopes (2006); Josias Souza da Silva (2007-2008); Elton Otero Bueno (2009); Davi Contri (2010); Elton Otero Bueno (2011-2012); Everson Teixeira Braga (2013-2014); Joao Rodrigues Ortiz Jr (2015-2019); Harlei Queiroga (2019-present).83

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“Notícias dos Pampas” [News from the Pampas]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 75, October 1980.

Novo Tempo [Adventist Media Center - Brazil]. https://www.novotempo.com/.

Pasini, Pedro H. “Em Novo Hamburgo, um Grupo que Cresce” [A Group that Grows In Novo Hamburgo]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 52 (February 1957).

“Presidência” [Presidency]. Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Mission – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019.

Preuss, Augusto P. “Relatorio trimensal da Conferência do Rio Grande do Sul do 4° trimestre de 1914” [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference Quarterly report of the 4th quarter of 1914]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 3 (March 1915).

“Rápidas” [Brief News]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 101, June 2006, 29.

Raymundo, Benito. “O Sul em Revista” [The South in Review]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 65 (June 1970).

Raymundo, Benito. “O Sul em Revista” [The South in Review]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 63, (November 1968).

“Reencontro apresenta resultados missionários na MOSR” [Reunion presents missionary results in the MOSR]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 2006.

Reencontro [Reunion]. Information on the Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/.

Renck, Boni. “Batismo da Primavera em Taquara” [Spring Baptism in Taquara]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 66 (February 1971).

Replogle, Leon. “Esteio.” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 32, no. 6 (June 1937).

Replogle, Leon. “Ijuhy.” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 32, no. 6 (June 1937).

“Rio Grande do Sul ganha mais um campo” [Rio Grande do Sul gets another field]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 92, February 1996.

Santos, Floriano X. dos. “Evangelismo – Ponta de Lança da Mensagem” [Evangelism – Message Spear’s Tip]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 55 (August 1960).

Santos, Osório. “Notícias do Rio Grande do Sul” [News from Rio Grande do Sul]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 70, (December 1975).

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, various years.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019.

Stencel, Renato. “O Processo de Expansão da Obra Educacional: o Ensino Superior adventista no Brasil” [The Educational Expansion Process: Adventist Higher Education in Brazil]. Acta Cientifica - Ciências Humanas 1 [Scientific Journal - Human Sciences 1], no. 10 (First semester of 2006).

“Surge Nova Igreja” [New Church Emerges]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 77, February 1982.

“Tesouraria e Expansão Patrimonial” [Treasury and Property Expansion]. Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Mission – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019.

“Três Quadrienais” [Three Quadrennials]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 56, April 1961.

Webster, F. C. “Inauguração do Templo Adventista em Passo Fundo” [Inauguration of the Passo Fundo Adventist Temple]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 48 (January 1953).

Weidle, Eugênio. “Passo Fundo.” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 38, (April 1943).

Wichineski, Ionara. “Mil membros da MOSR se comprometem com a Escola Missionária” [A thousand MOSR members are committed to the Missionary School]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1212, year 104 (May 2009).

Wilcox, E. H. “Escola Cruzeiro do Sul” [Cruzeiro do Sul School]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 29, no. 3 (March 1934).

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/373Fve4.

  2. Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference], “Escolas” [Schools], accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2MrBgPW.

  3. “Jovens, Música, Comunicação, Universitários” [Youth, Music, Communication, University Students], Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Conference – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019, 46.

  4. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “North Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/373Fve4.

  5. Fabiana Bertotti, ed., 100 Anos de Fé, Pioneirismo e Missão [100 Years of Faith, Pioneerism and Mission] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 16-21.

  6. Edegar Link, e-mail message to Renato Gross, November 9, 2016.

  7. Odailson Fonseca, ed., 100 Anos de Fé, Pioneirismo e Ação [100 Years of Faith, Pioneerism and Action] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 21; Fabiana Bertotti, “Direto nas fontes” [Direct in the sources], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1266, year 108 (November 2013): 27.

  8. Renato Stencel, “O Processo de Expansão da Obra Educacional: o Ensino Superior adventista no Brasil” [The Educational Expansion Process: Adventist Higher Education in Brazil], Acta Cientifica - Ciências Humanas 1 [Scientific Journal - Human Sciences 1], no. 10, (First semester of 2006): 38-39.

  9. Fabiana Bertotti, ed., 100 Anos de Fé, Pioneirismo e Missão [100 Years of Faith, Pioneerism and Mission] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 23.

  10. Augusto P. Preuss, “Relatorio trimensal da Conferência do Rio Grande do Sul do 4° trimestre de 1914” [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference Quarterly report of the 4th quarter of 1914], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 3 (March 1915): 8.

  11. L. Lotz, “Rio Grande do Sul,” Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 15, no. 5 (May 1920): 14.

  12. N. P. Neilsen, “Reuniões Geraes no Rio Grande do Sul” [General Meetings in Rio Grande do Sul], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 24, no. 6 (June 1929): 13.

  13. N. P. Neilsen, “Notícias da União Sul-Brasileira” [News of the South Brazil Union Conference], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 23, no. 1 (January 1928): 8.

  14. E. H. Wilcox, “Escola Cruzeiro do Sul” [Cruzeiro do Sul School], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 29, no. 3 (March 1934): 15.

  15. Leon Replogle, “Esteio,” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 32, no. 6 (June 1937): 11.

  16. Ibid.

  17. Eugênio Weidle, “Passo Fundo,” Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 38 (April 1943): 12.

  18. Araceli S. Melo, “O Que Vai Por Passo Fundo” [What is going on in Passo Fundo], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 44 (February 1949): 9.

  19. F. C. Webster, “Inauguração do Templo Adventista em Passo Fundo” [Inauguration of the Passo Fundo Adventist Temple], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, Year 48 (January 1953): 12.

  20. Pedro H. Pasini, “Em Novo Hamburgo, um Grupo que Cresce” [A Group that Grows In Novo Hamburgo], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 52 (February 1957): 26.

  21. Floriano X. dos Santos, “Evangelismo – Ponta de Lança da Mensagem” [Evangelism – Message Spear’s Tip], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 55 (August 1960): 35.

  22. “Três Quadrienais” [Three Quadrennials], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, Year 56, April 1961, 26.

  23. Waldemar Leitzke, “A Mão Divina Não Está Encolhida” [The Divine Hand Is Not Shrunken], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 60 (October 1965): 21-22.

  24. “The Radio School served to enable the sending of lessons from Bible courses students and to answer the listeners' letters.” Alexandre Brasil Fonseca, “Muito Além do Sábado: O Pioneirismo Adventista na Mídia Eletrônica Religiosa” [Far Beyond Sabbath: Adventist Pioneers in Religious Electronic Media], Revista de Estudos da Religião [Religion Studies Review], year 8 (September 2008): 96.

  25. A Voz da Profecia [The Voice of Prophecy] is the oldest evangelical program in the Brazilian radio, starting in 1943. Since its beginning, it has counted with the musical participation of the quartet Arautos do Rei [The King’s Heralds]. Nowadays, the program has its version, also, on TV, and it is presented by pastor Gilson Brito, who has been in the pastoral ministry for over 30 years. These are biblical sermons that present a message of hope and salvation.” Novo Tempo [Adventist Media Center - Brazil], “A Voz da Profecia” [The Voice of Prophecy], accessed on January 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RzGrRh.

  26. Arno H. Köhler, “Evangelismo Público em Nôvo Hamburgo” [Public Evangelism in Nôvo Hamburgo], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 62 (August 1967): 27.

  27. Benito Raymundo, “O Sul em Revista” [The South in Review], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 63 (November 1968): 29.

  28. Benito Raymundo, “O Sul em Revista” [The South in Review], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 65 (June 1970): 30.

  29. Boni Renck, “Batismo da Primavera em Taquara” [Spring Baptism in Taquara], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 66 (February 1971): 27.

  30. Arno H. Köhler, “Rádio e Evangelismo” [Radio and Evangelism], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 68 (July 1973): 20-21.

  31. Osório Santos, “Notícias do Rio Grande do Sul” [News from Rio Grande do Sul], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 70 (December 1975): 22.

  32. Arno H. Köhler, “Penetração no Rio Grande do Sul” [Ingress into Rio Grande do Sul], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 72 (August 1977): 22.

  33. Ivo Santos Cardoso, “Concílios e Inaugurações Marcam Progresso Gaúcho” [Councils and Inaugurations Mark the Rio Grande do Sul Progress], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 73 (October 1978): 23.

  34. “IACS Evangeliza Arredores” [IACS Evangelizes Surroundings], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 74, December 1979, 20.

  35. “Notícias dos Pampas” [News from the Pampas], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 75, October 1980, 20.

  36. “Smoking is one of the main factors of risk for early death and disability worldwide. Today there are around 1.1 billion smokers in the world. [...] That is why the Seventh-day Adventist Church promotes the initiative ‘Como Parar de Fumar em cinco dias’ [How to Quit Smoking in Five Days], with the sole purpose of helping people to permanently quit the tobacco use, promoting courses in their local churches or in partnerships with city halls, NGOs and hospitals. The course is offered to the entire population and in each region is taught on different dates throughout the year. Physical, mental and spiritual health is one of the Adventist Church concerns and the Como Parar de Fumar [How to Quit Smoking] course is part of this work that is offered free of charge.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Como Parar de Fumar” [How to Quit Smoking], accessed on June 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2B34S3S.

  37. “Fotos e Acontecimentos” [Photos and Events], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 76, September 1981, 34.

  38. “Surge Nova Igreja” [New Church Arises], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 77, February 1982, 22.

  39. “Jovens Usam Rádio Para Evangelismo” [Youth Uses Radio for Evangelism], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 78, December 1983, 35.

  40. “Mensagem no Ar” [Message on the Air], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 80, May 1985, 26.

  41. “Centro Educacional” [Educational Center], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 83, February 1987, 25.

  42. “Educação na Sul-Rio-Grandense” [Education at the Rio Grande do Sul Conference], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 83, February 1987, 24.

  43. “Gaúchos celebram os 85 da Obra Adventista” [Rio Grande do Sul people celebrate 85 of Adventist Work], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 86, January 1990, 19.

  44. “Global Mission is the frontline mission branch of the Adventist Mission, a worldwide department of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The Global Mission projects start as local initiatives. It supports local frontline ministry initiatives in non-penetrated areas [by the Adventist Church] and helps to involve all church departments in this task.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “O que é Missão Global” [What is the Global Mission], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/35Wz9e0.

  45. “Gaúchos alargam fronteiras” [Rio Grande do Sul widen borders], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 88, July 1992, 22.

  46. “Emissora de rádio é o destaque” [Radio station is the highlight], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 88, August 1992, 21.

  47. “ADRA cumpre maratona de inaugurações na União Sul” [ADRA runs marathons of inauguration in the South Union], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 90, January 1994, 13.

  48. Rafaela Bagattini, “Palmeira das Missões – Município unirá menores do Lar Adventista e Cesbo” [Palmeira das Missões - Municipality will unite minors from Children’s Home and Cesbo], Diário RS [RS Daily], April 10, 2014, accessed on July 30, 2020, https://bit.ly/3jY7dib.

  49. “Escola de Esteio é a maior do Rio Grande” [Esteio School is the largest of Rio Grande], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 90, August 1994, 14.

  50. “Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1994), 277.

  51. “Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1995), 281.

  52. “Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1996), 290-291.

  53. “Rio Grande do Sul ganha mais um campo” [Rio Grande do Sul gets another field], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 2, year 92, February 1996, 19-20.

  54. A Seventh-day Adventist Church evangelist canvasser is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, with the objective of transmitting to their fellow men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation, physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Colportagem” [Canvassing], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  55. The Pathfinders Club is made up of boys and girls aged 10 to 15. They usually meet once a week, to learn and to develop talents, skills, and appreciation for nature. They are thrilled with outdoor activities like camping, hiking, climbing, and exploring the woods and caves. They also fight against the use of smoke, alcohol and drugs. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Quem somos” [About Us], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  56. “Western Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1997), 268.

  57. “Lançado Projeto Missão Global 2000” [Global Mission Project 2000 launched], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 92, July 1996, 16.

  58. “Missão Ocidental mostra crescimento” [Western Mission shows growth], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 92, September 1996, 22.

  59. “Divisão justificada” [Splitting justified], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 93, July 1997, 23.

  60. “Western Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2006), 277.

  61. The “Reunion” is a “program carried out by the Seventh-day Adventist Church with the goal of reaching out to its estranged members.” Reencontro [Reunion], information on the Facebook page, accessed on June 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Z1bg3E.

  62. “Reencontro apresenta resultados missionários na MOSR” [Reunion presents missionary results in the MOSR], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 2006, 32; “Rápidas” [Brief News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 101, June 2006, 29.

  63. A Small Group is a group of people who meet weekly under the coordination of a leader aiming for spiritual, relational and evangelistic growth. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Pequenos Grupos” [Small Groups], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NtcXj7.

  64. “Congresso mostra resultados do projeto ‘Poder’ na MOSR” [Congress shows ‘Power’ project results at the MOSR], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 101, November 2006, 25.

  65. Ionara Wichineski, “Mil membros da MOSR se comprometem com a Escola Missionária” [A thousand MOSR members are committed to the Missionary School], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1212, year 104 (May 2009): 29.

  66. “Western Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 294.

  67. “Western Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2013), 294.

  68. “North Rio Grande do Sul Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 256-257.

  69. From the writting office, “Comissão diretiva vota mudança de nomenclatura e status da sede adventista para o norte do RS” [Steering committee votes nomenclature and status change for the north of RS Adventist headquarters], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], May 7, 2018, accessed on July 31, 2020, https://bit.ly/3hUGMbA.

  70. “North Rio Grande do Sul Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 256-257.

  71. “The Hope Impact Project encourages reading and provides a huge annual distribution of books by Seventh-day Adventists in the territory of South America.” Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact Project], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  72. “Presidência” [Presidency], Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Mission – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019, 6.

  73. “The movement called Caravana da Esperança [Caravan of Hope] is promoted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and travels through cities in South America with the goal of presenting biblical themes. Evellin Fagundes, “Caravana da Esperança passará por Itabuna” [Caravan of Hope will pass through Itabuna], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 14, 2016, accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2JIiogj.

  74. “Evangelismo, Mordomia Cristã e Ministério da Saúde” [Evangelism, Christian Stewardship and Health Ministry], Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Mission – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019, 91.

  75. Giovanni Manzolli, “Novo Hamburgo ganha Espaço Vida e Saúde para atender comunidade” [Novo Hamburgo gains Life and Health Center to serve the community], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], April 2, 2019, accessed on July 31, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XeOd5c.

  76. “The Adventurers Club is a program for children aged 6 to 9, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in 1972. At their meetings, children carry out activities with a focus on physical, mental and spiritual development.” Seventh Day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Aventureiros” [Adventurers], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NyYUuw.

  77. Giovani Manzolli, “Desbravadores do norte gaúcho participam de Campori totalmente feito pelo Instagram” [Pathfinders from the north of Rio Grande do Sul participate in a Campori through Instagram], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 19, 2019, accessed on June 3, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xr8l7b.

  78. “Camporee is a large camp that gathers teenagers, youth and children who participate in the clubs maintained by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Campori de Desbravadores da DSA” [South America Division (SAD) Pathfinders Camporee], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2uwY377.

  79. Giovani Manzolli, “Desbravadores do norte gaúcho participam de Campori totalmente feito pelo Instagram” [Pathfinders from the north of Rio Grande do Sul participate in a Campori through Instagram], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 19, 2019, accessed on June 3, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xr8l7b.

  80. Giovanni Manzolli, “Sede administrativa Adventista para o norte gaúcho elege líderes para o próximo quadriênio” [Adventist administrative headquarters for the north of Rio Grande do Sul elects leaders for the next quadrennium], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 24, 2019, accessed on July 31, 2020, https://bit.ly/318FdQv.

  81. “Presidência” [Presidency], Prossigo Para o Alvo: Associação Norte Sul-Rio-Grandense – I Assembleia Quadrienal [Proceeding to the Target: North Rio Grande do Sul Mission – I Quadrennial Assembly], 2015-2019, 6.

  82. “Western Rio Grande do Sul Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1997), 268; “North Rio Grande do Sul Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 256-257; Giovanni Manzolli, “Sede administrativa Adventista para o norte gaúcho elege líderes para o próximo quadriênio” [Adventist administrative headquarters for the north of Rio Grande do Sul elects leaders for the next quadrennium], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 24, 2019, accessed on July 31, 2020, https://bit.ly/318FdQv. For a more detailed check on the leaders of the Associação Norte Sul Rio-Grandense [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference], see the Yearbooks from 1997 to 2020.

  83. More information about the Associação Norte Sul Rio-Grandense [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference] can be consulted on the website http://ansr.adventistas.org or on social networks - Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: @adventistasnsr and YouTube: Adventistas Note Sul-Rio-Grandense [North Rio Grande do Sul Conference.

×

Sena, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues, Renato Gross. "North Rio Grande Do Sul Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 08, 2022. Accessed November 29, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AJ8I.

Sena, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues, Renato Gross. "North Rio Grande Do Sul Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 08, 2022. Date of access November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AJ8I.

Sena, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues, Renato Gross (2022, January 08). North Rio Grande Do Sul Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved November 29, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=AJ8I.