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South Brazil Union Conference facade, 2019.

Photo courtesy of South Brazil Union Conference Archives.

South Brazil Union Conference

By Renato Gross, and Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira

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Renato Gross

Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira

The South Brazil Union Conference (SBUC) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA) located in the South American Division (SAD) territory. It is headquartered at Rua João Carlos de Souza Castro, no. 562, ZIP Code 81520-290, in Guabirotuba district, in the city of Curitiba, capital of the state of Parana, Brazil.1

The SBUC’s missionary territory covers the states of Parana, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul, which comprises the South Region of Brazil. The population of this territory is about 30,066,968 people, while the number of baptized Adventists is 176,083. That is, there is about one Adventist per 170 inhabitants. These members meet in 1,162 churches throughout SBUC’s territory.2

The SBUC members are, in large part, European descendants that migrated to Brazil during the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. Among them, there are children, grandchildren, and other descendants from Germany, Italy, Poland, Ukraine, Austria, Spain, Portugal, Japan, among other countries. Furthermore, it stands out that the only Adventist African settlement in Brazil is located in Porto Belo, in the municipality of Santa Catarina.3 In this place, “they’re all African and Seventh-day Adventist descendants [...] probably remnants of the 1,639 registered slaves in Porto Belo parish in 1851.”4

Regarding the description of the region served by SBUC, the Adventist Review5 reported that “the region’s topography is varied.” There is a sea ridge along the coast, and a plateau forms the remainder of the area. With exuberant woods, fields, and extensive wheat and soy plantations in the agricultural regions of north Parana, these are considered the most fertile lands around the world.”6

The administrative units overseen by the SBUC in the state of Paraná are: South Parana Conference, located at Avenida Senador Salgado Filho, no. 5,280, zip code 81580-000, Uberaba district, in Curitiba, Parana; North Parana Conference, located at Avenida Carlos Corrêa Borges, no. 1,336, zip code 87060-000, Jardim Iguaçu district, in Maringa, Parana; Central Parana Conference, located at Rua Dep. João Ferreira Neves, no. 159, zip code 80820-380, Vista Alegre district, in Curitiba, Parana; and West Parana Conference, located at Rua Nereu Ramos, no. 2,364, zip code 85810-210, City Center, in Cascavel, Parana.7

Besides these, SBUC also oversees the administrative units of the church in the state of Santa Catarina: North Santa Catarina Conference, located at Rua Joaçaba, no. 355, zip code 89221-340, Saguaçu district, in Joinville, Santa Catarina; and Santa Catarina Conference, located at Rua Gisela, no. 900, zip code 88110-110, Barreiros district, in São José, Santa Catarina. In the state of Rio Grande do Sul the local fields overseen are: Rio Grande do Sul Conference, located at Av.Caí, no. 82, zip code 90810-120, Cristal district, in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul; Central Rio Grande do Sul Conference, located at Rua João Wallig, no. 596, zip code 91340-001, Passo d'Areia, in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul; and Northern Rio Grande do Sul Mission, located at Av. Pedro Adams Filho, no. 3224, zip code 93410-038, in Novo Hamburgo, Rio Grande do Sul.8

SBUC has three boarding schools in its territory where young men and women from many places in Brazil and other countries attend. The schools are: Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist Academy in the city of Taquara, Rio Grande do Sul, with more than 1,300 students;9 Santa Catarina Adventist Academy in Araquari, close to Joinville and São Francisco do Sul, Santa Catarina, with 642 enrolled students;10 and Parana Adventist Academy (IAP). IAP has about 1,200 students and is part of a university campus that also offers basic education. The university offers the following graduate courses: theology (SALT), pedagogy, nursing, business administration, accounting, and psychology. IAP is located at PR-317 Highway, Km. 119, zip code 87130-000, in a rural area of the city of Ivatuba, close to Maringá, in the state of Paraná.11

There are other Adventist institutions in the territory of the South Brazil Union Conference (SBUC), such as: Jardim Pinheiros Home for Girls,12 located at Rua Padre José Martini, no. 1161, zip code 82410-300, Jardim Pinheiros district, in Curitiba, in the state of Parana; Adventist Home for the Elderly, at Rua Catarino Andreata, no. 47, zip code 91750-040, Vila Nova district, in Porto Alegre, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul; Curitiba Adventist Clinic, located at Alameda Júlia da Costa, no. 1447, zip code 80730-070, Bigorrilho district, in Curitiba, Paraná; and Porto Alegre Adventist Clinic, at Rua Matias José Bins, no. 581, zip code 91330-290, Três Figueiras district, in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul.13

SBUC has a total of 7,430 employees. Of these, 6,650 employees work throughout the union’s territory and 67 work in the union office. There are also 479 credentialed workers and another 234 licensed workers serving in the SBUC. Among these workers, 39 work in the union office, while the rest of them work throughout the union’s territory. Ordained ministers total 426, and there are 109 licensed ministers. Of these ministers, 14 work at the union office of SBUC and the others work throughout the union’s territory.14

Organizational History

Accounts of Adventist beginnings in Brazil indicate that Adventism arrived in the country in the 1880s when Adventist literature in German was sent to the port city of Itajaí, Santa Catarina. A few years later, Elwin W. Snyder, C. A. Nowlen, and Albert B. Stauffer were sent to South America as missionaries. Stauffer was first. In the 1890s, he worked as a canvasser. Later, many other missionaries arrived in the country to announce the eternal gospel.15

Most of the canvassers that sold Adventist literature during this period in the southern region did so mainly in German colonies. This was because they only had books and periodicals in German; there was no Adventist literature in Portuguese at that time. Just like the books and periodicals (including Ellen G. White's writings) sold by the canvassers, the Bibles and hymnals were also in German. This explains why Adventist evangelism in Brazil started in German communities and the urgency expressed by the first leaders to translate all the church publications into Portuguese. Given this situation, Adventists realized the urgent need of starting a publishing house in the country. The initial work carried out by canvassing resulted in many conversions, which resulted in the first Sabbath keepers. Because there were no ordained ministers working in Brazil, the first baptism took place 15 years after Adventism arrived in the country.16

In the city of Piracicaba, São Paulo State, Pastor Frank Westphal baptized Guilherme Stein Júnior, the first Adventist baptized in Brazil. Westphal also organized the first Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, in the city of Gaspar Alto, Santa Catarina, on June 15, 1895. Pastor Westphal lived in Argentina, but he worked all over South America. In turn, Huldreich Ferdinand Graf was the first pastor to be officially appointed to work in Brazil. On October 4, 1895, he landed in Rio de Janeiro’s harbor, accompanied by his wife, Alvina. Graf lived in the cities of Joinville (Santa Catarina), Curitiba (Parana) and, later on, in Taquari (Rio Grande do Sul).17 During the 12 years that he worked in the country, Graf organized about 20 churches, baptized more than 1,400 people, and founded the first Adventist schools in the country.18 “It is estimated that throughout his whole ministry, Graf rode about 25,000 km [15,500 miles].”19

Of the 12 first Seventh-day Adventist churches in Brazil, seven were in places that today are part of SBUC’s territory. They were all in German communities. As previously mentioned, the first SDA church in Brazil was founded by pastor Westphal. However, it is worthwhile to note that the other six churches were founded by Pastor Graf. These other churches were founded in the following cities: Joinville (in April 1896); Curitiba (in January 1897); Benedito Novo (in July 1897); Ijuí (in November 1897); Linha Formosa, (in December 1897); and Não-Me-Toque (“Do-Not-Touch-Me”; in October 1898). The last church in this list was the first Portuguese speaking Seventh-day Adventist church in Brazil.20

On April 15, 1906, the Adventists in Rio Grande do Sul21 were summoned for the organization of Rio Grande do Sul Conference.22 At the time, members met in six congregations and many organized groups; 444 members gathered at Taquari Academy.23 Furthermore, Santa Catarina-Parana Conference, headquartered in Parana, was also organized in 1906 with responsibility for the work in the states of Santa Catarina and Parana. This conference had 12 churches totaling 427 members, eight church schools, eight teachers, two canvassers, and one ordained pastor. Overall, in 1906, in the three southern Brazilian states that currently compose SBUC’s territory there were 18 Adventist churches, 871 members, and nine Adventist schools with 153 enrolled students.24

Later, in 1911, a new administrative unit that would manage the development of the Adventist work in Brazil was organized: the Brazil Union Conference. This new union was reorganized a few years later, between 1918 and 1919. On that occasion, the North Union Conference was created, predecessor of the current Southeast Brazil Union Conference. When this division took place, the Brazil Union Conference was known as the South Brazil Union Conference and was held responsible for overseeing Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina Conferences, as well as the missions in the state of Parana, western Minas, São Paulo, Mato Grosso, and Goiás.25

In 1925, SBUC already had at least 45 churches with a total of 3,039 baptized members.26 Five years later, in 1930, because of the success seen in the region’s evangelism, there were 48 churches and almost 4,500 members in the union’s territory.27 A decade later, in 1940, SBUC had 57 churches with 8,745 members and 63 schools with 2,253 students. And in 1955, there were 87 churches with 24,174 members and 80 schools with 3,279 students. Later, in 1965, SBUC was responsible for 234 churches with 58,086 members and 169 Adventist schools with 7,502 students. By middle of the following decade, there were 385 churches with 152,006 members and 207 schools and 43,620 students.28 These were the early days of the quick expansion of Adventism in the region now overseen by the South Brazil Union Conference.

In those days, the number of members in SBUC kept growing. This was a challenge for the management of all the churches in the vast region.29 Therefore, a request for a survey to evaluate the feasibility of reorganizing the field was lodged. On February 21, 1984, SDA General Conference officials appointed a survey committee to examine the issue. Later, on May 8, 1984, the commission presented its report of the studies done. In line with its recommendations, on November 1, 1984, the General Conference Committee voted to approve SBUC's request to have its field reorganized into two unions.30 A few days later, on November 19, 1984, the South American Division (SAD) voted (actions 84-419 and 84-420) the details for SBUC’s division.31 As a result, in January 1985, at a meeting held at Brazil College, in the city of São Paulo, the SBUC assembly convened to reorganize its territory into two fields, a decision that took effect on January 12, 1985.32

After the reorganization, the former South Brazil Union Conference was renamed the Central Brazil Union Conference,33 with headquarters at Av. Acoce, no. 544, Indianópolis District, in the city of São Paulo.34 Then, the new union carried on the South Brazil Union Conference name35 with temporary headquarters at Rua Brigadeiro Franco, no. 1275, in Curitiba.36 A few months later, on April 28, 1985, its headquarters was transferred to Rua João Carlos de Souza Castro, no. 562, Guabirotuba District, also in Curitiba, Parana, where it remains to this day.37

“The newly-formed field, received from the former SBUC, 43.7 percent of the members, 37.3 percent of tithes and 47.5 percent of the churches and groups. SBUC started to work in an area of 928,271 km2 [576,801 sq. mi.], which represents 10.9 percent of the Brazilian territory, with an estimated population of 20,404,000 inhabitants, according to [the] 1980 census, which represented a proportion of 17.2 percent of the national population. At the end of 1985 there [were] in this field 82,448 Adventists, equivalent to 20 percent of the church members in Brazil.”38 The first president of the new administrative unit was pastor Rodolpho Gorsky, who previously worked as secretary of the former SBUC. The recognition of the new SBUC took place at the 54th General Conference Session held in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, between June 27 and the July 6 of 1985.39

On its creation, the new SBUC was held responsible for managing the development of the Adventist work in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Parana, Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina. The SDA local fields under the supervision of the new administration were: Parana Conference with 30,753 members, Rio Grande do Sul Conference with 28,920 members, Santa Catarina Conference with 10,315 members, and South Mato Grosso Mission with 9,945 members.40 Regarding education, there were 96 schools in the new SBUC territory. Among these educational institutions were Cruzeiro do Sul Adventist Academy in the city of Taquara, Rio Grande do Sul, which at the time was already 60 years old, and Colégio Internacional (International Academy), which was the first Adventist Academy established in Brazil. The following year it celebrated its 90th year in Curitiba41

In SBUC’s first five years of operation, 30,308 people were baptized in its territory. With membership growth, the leadership saw the need to create more conferences. Thus, North Parana Conference and South Parana Conference were created by dividing the territory of the Parana Conference in 1989.42 Later, between 1991 and 1995, the number of baptisms increased to 42,399 showing steady growth in the number of members and indicating the Adventist message was being spread in a consistent way through the region.43

During the same period, from 1991 to 1995, Adventist development in SBUC territory was also evident in the educational field. During this time, six new secondary schools were opened, 37 new properties were bought, and 36 new educational buildings were built.44 At the same time, 43 new programs of spiritual multiplication were carried out. These projects focused on motivating and promoting individual engagement of members in some area of missionary activity.45 Furthermore, there was strong growth in the actions of Adventist social assistance, through 21 Adventist Centers of Community Development spread throughout the SBUC region.46

In 1995, the SBUC membership was already more than 100,000 people. At the time, there were more than a thousand congregations in the union. In that same year, several events confirmed the notable growth and strength in the union. One of the local fields overseen by SBUC, South Mato Grosso Mission had gained sufficient financial strength to be fully self-supporting and became the South Mato Grosso Conference. Furthermore, a new field in Santa Catarina territory was organized, the Western Rio Grande do Sul Mission, headquartered in the town of Ijuí. In education, SBUC primary schools increased until there were 100 in the region.47

During the quinquennium of 1996-2000, about 57,890 people were baptized in SBUC. This represented an annual average of new converts of 11,578 people.48 In 1999, the territory covered by the SBUC had a general population of about 26,878,080 inhabitants, of which at least 122,764 were church members gathering in 569 congregations all over the region. The ratio was about one Adventist for every 219 individuals living in the South Brazil Region.49

The new quinquennium started with many expectations about radical changes in the social, political, economic, and religious spheres in the country. In the third semester of 2003, there were 150,721 baptized members under SBUC’s leadership. By the end of 2004, the number of organized churches was 772, while the number of organized companies was 927.50 It was during this quinquennium that district pastors in SBUC held 810 evangelistic campaigns.51 About 91 cities without an Adventist presence were entered. However, a challenge remained because the total number of municipalities with no Adventist presence in SBUC territory was still 523.52

In 2004 a change was made in the territorial configuration of SBUC. Oversight responsibility for the Western Mato Grosso do Sul Mission, whose territory is the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, was transferred to West Central Brazil Union Mission (WCBU). This new Union was created from parts of the territories of Central and South Brazil Unions. WCBU is responsible for SDA work in the states of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Tocantins, Goiás, and the Federal District. SBUC became responsible for Adventist work in the states of Santa Catarina, Parana, and Rio Grande do Sul, and still is to the present.53

Due to the constant growth and the need to meet the demands arising from this expansion, in 2006, a new conference was organized in SBUC territory: Central Rio Grande do Sul Conference, headquartered at Rua João Wallig, no. 596, Passo d’Areia District, in the city of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul.54 Three years later, in 2009, the conference with the largest membership in SBUC was South Parana Conference, which at the time had 38,518 baptized members meeting in 190 churches throughout its territory.55

In 2010, another conference was formed in SBUC territory: the Central Parana Conference, headquartered at Rua Deputado João Ferreira Neves, no. 159, Vista Alegre District, in the city of Curitiba, Parana. This new conference was responsible for overseeing 21,551 members, meeting in 108 churches in the central region of Parana. The territory of this conference came from portions of the territories of North and South Parana Conferences.56

In 2012, due to the growth of Adventist membership in the region, North Santa Catarina Conference was organized. It was headquartered at Rua Joaçaba, no. 355, Saguaçu District, in Joinville, Santa Catarina State.57 The following year, to better assist local members and other demands of the territory, another mission was created, the West Parana Mission, headquartered at Rua Pernambuco, no. 1564, in the center of Cascavel, Parana State.58

Later, in 2014, SBUC developed a new approach in order to motivate even more engagement of Adventist members in reaching out to save others. The initiative was known as “Cada Um Salvando Um” (Each One Save One) and it was designed as a network of people who work to see other people's lives transformed. The process happens through discipleship, which involves three guidelines: communion, relationship and mission. The member commits to using his gifts as a tool for saving others. In this project, it is expected that the people reached will themselves become disciples to reach others, and so on. The project follows the historic ideal of the SBUC mission, which since its inception, has always been to spread the gospel, following Jesus’ command.59

Also in 2014, in August, the Corporate University of SBUC (UNICA) was created, which, through distance learning, offers continuing education to the union’s workers. Since its inception, UNICA has developed around 20 projects involving almost all areas of leadership and management. To record and teach the classes, UNICA has the collaboration of specialized teachers with masters and doctoral degrees. There are about 2,530 professionals registered at UNICA, including teachers, coordinators, counselors, chaplains, directors and vice-directors, treasurers and vice treasurers.60

On November 15, 2015, SBUC, long established at the same address, reopened its completely renovated headquarters. After its restructuring, the head office now has 47,125 sq. ft. (4,378.04 m2) of floor space with the necessary amenities needed for the efficient and comfortable performance of all activities of the union. The building’s design was made to be a harmonious and aesthetically appropriate style, representing the presence of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in southern Brazil.61

Adventist membership growth in SBUC territory has been remarkable with both new churches and companies being organized in the past few years. Furthermore, other areas of church activity highlight such expansion. In education, for example, in 2016 about 37,053 students were enrolled at the various levels of SBUC's educational institutions. Two new courses of study were begun at Parana Adventist Academy: theology (under the supervision of the Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary) and pedagogy.62

Also in 2016, Parana Adventist Academy offered 40 scholarships for the pedagogy course. This number will probably increase to 160 in 2020. Furthermore, school units were opened and reopened in the cities of Araucária and São José dos Pinhais, in Parana, and in Gravataí, Rio Grande do Sul. Land was also acquired for the creation and expansion of schools in Canoas, in Rio Grande do Sul, Pinhais, Toledo, Cascavel, Umuarama, and Campo Mourão, in Parana. SBUC has similar plans for Passo Fundo, in Rio Grande do Sul, and Criciúma and Jaraguá do Sul, in Santa Catarina.63

In recent years, the programs of the Adventist Media Center-Brazil have been broadcast all over the SBUC territory on three different radio stations. This represents an average potential audience of almost 3 million listeners. In addition, Hope Channel Brazil is broadcast in 145 towns in the area by means of an over-the-air signal and in more than 359 cities by cable making an estimated average of 8.52 million potential viewers in the South Region of Brazil.64 Regarding canvassing, SBUC has 283 regular canvassers. 65 And, during vacations, students are added to the full time canvassers, reaching 702 in July 2016.66 Amid all this missionary activity, in 2017 the West Parana Mission became a Conference.67

SBUC leaders have encouraged the members to get involved in the evangelistic projects developed by SAD, such as: Impacto Esperança (Hope Impact),68 Caleb Mission,69 Breaking the Silence,70 and Christian Summer School for Children,71 among others. In 2019, just in SBUC territory, about 3.2 million evangelistic books were handed out to the public. The book handed out in 2019 was “Esperança para a Família: caminho para um final feliz” (“Hope for the Family: a path for a happy ending”), by Willie and Elaine Oliver.72

Still in 2019, just in Central Parana, between July 13 and 27, 2019, about 1,600 young people were directly involved with the Mission Caleb Project. During this project they made renovations to daycare centers and schools, revitalized squares, parks, and sidewalks, cleared landscapes and empty plots, distributed food and clothes, besides other activities. In addition, in the metropolitan region of Curitiba, children from poor communities were invited to participate in the Christian Summer School for Children in which many workshops were offered, such as painting, cooking, and recreation.73

Through many and varied mission activities, SBUC advances in the fulfilment of its mission of bringing the eternal gospel to the people of southern Brazil. While recognizing and appreciating the birthplace of Adventism in Brazil, the leadership and members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in this region are challenged to maintain a solid commitment to the precious legacy of faith and missionary effort of those pioneers that began the Adventist work on this part of the continent.

Chronology of Administrative Executives74

Presidents: Rodolpho Gorski (1986-2001); Samuel G. F. Zukowski (2001); Ignácio Kalbermatter (2001-2010); Marlinton Lopes (2010-current).

Secretaries: Adolpho dos Reis (1986); David Moróz (1986-1988); Wilson Sarli (1989-1993); Ivanaudo Barbosa de Oliveira (1994-2005); Valdilho Quadrado (2005-2010); Evandro Fávero (2010-2015); Charles Rampanelli (2015-current).

Treasurers: Adolpho dos Reis (1986-1989); Marino Francisco de Oliveira (1990-2000); Marlon de Souza Lopes (2001-2008); Davi Contri (2008-2015); Edson Erthal de Medeiros (2015-2018); Volnei da Rosa Porto (2018-current).75

Sources

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“Aulas extras” [Extra Classes]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 2011.

Azevedo, Paulo Cesar de. “O ensino adventista de nível médio no Brasil” [High School Adventist education in Brazil]. In: A educação adventista no Brasil: uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist Education in Brazil: A Story of Adventures and Miracles], organized by A. R. Timm, 52. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Unaspress, 2004.

Bertotti, F. 100 anos de fé pioneirismo e missão [100 years of faith, pioneering, and mission]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006.

Bonfim, Luciene. “Comunidades paranaenses são beneficiadas com trabalho da Missão Calebe” [Parana communities are benefited with Mission Caleb’s work]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 23, 2019.

Bonfim, Luciene. “Em Curitiba livro missionário é entregue pelo serviço do CéuDeux Carteiros da Esperança” [“Missionary book is handed out in Curitiba by the CéuDeux service of Hope Mailmen”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), May 28, 2019.

Borges, Michelson Borges. A chegada do Adventismo no Brasil [The arrival of Adventism in Brazil]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2000.

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Education Department of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The history of our Church. Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, n.d.

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Fonseca, O., editor. Associação Sul Rio-Grandense – 100 anos de Fé, Pioneirismo e Ação [Rio Grande do Sul Conference - 100 years of Faith, Pioneering and Action]. Porto Alegre, RS: Rio Grande do Sul Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, n.d.

Greenleaf, F. Terra da esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of hope: the growth of the Adventist Church in South America]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

“IACS Completará 60 Anos de Educação Integral” [IACS Celebrates 60 Years of Integral Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 1988.

Lessa, Rubens. “Mesa Plenária Histórica: DSA Cria Nova União e Reafirma Programa de Evangelismo Integrado” [Historical Round Table: SAD Creates New Union and Confirms Integrated Evangelism Program], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 2004.

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Pessoa, Douglas. “Planejamento do Quebrando o Silêncio envolve vereadores de Santo Ângelo, RS” [Breaking the Silence Planning involves Santo Ângelo, RS, councilmen]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), June 18, 2019.

Peverini, H. J., Em las huellas de la providência [In the footsteps of Providence]. Buenos Aires: South American Spanish Publishing House, 1988.

Pinheiro, Paulo. “União Sul Brasileira: Menos Espaço Para Evangelizar Melhor” [South Brazil Union Conference: Less Space For Better Evangelizing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1986.

Prado, Juliana. “A missão continua” [The mission goes on], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 2018.

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Schünemann, Haller E. Stach. “O tempo do fim: uma história social da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia no Brasil” [End of times: a social story of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil]. Doctor’s thesis, Methodist University of São Paulo, 2002.

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Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Santa Catarina Conference,” accessed on July 25, 2019, http://bit.ly/32LUqXL. Statistics are from June 30, 2018.

  2. Ibid.

  3. Catarinense is the thing or person that is related or pertaining to the state of Santa Catarina. Accessed on July 25, 2019, http://bit.ly/32Ioxz8.

  4. Michelson Borges, A chegada do Adventismo no Brasil [The arrival of Adventism in Brazil] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2000), 143-154.

  5. The Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] is the “official Communication body of the Brazilian Seventh-day Adventist Church”. It is monthly edited by Brazil Publishing House. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1938, 16.

  6. Paulo Pinheiro, “União Sul Brasileira: Menos Espaço Para Evangelizar Melhor” [South Brazil Union Conference: Less Space For Better Evangelizing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1986, 44.

  7. Machado, Paulo, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016.

  8. Ibid.

  9. Juliana Prado, “A missão continua” [The mission goes on], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 2018, 39.

  10. Wesley Zukowski, email message to Luvercy Ferreira, March 14, 2019.

  11. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016.

  12. “Jardim Pinheiros Home for Girls, created on 04/16/1994 it is kept and administrated by the IASBEA (South Brazil Adventist Institution of Education and Foster Care), it’s a Childcare Unit (Home) for female children from 2 to 10 years old, sent by Child Protective Services, as a protection measure, where the child is guaranteed its basic needs and interaction with the community, being able to stay until family reintegration, or been sent to a substitute family or until they are 14 years old.” Accessed on October 31, 2018, https://goo.gl/N3HRTi.

  13. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016.

  14. Marcio Costa (Historical Theology Professor at SALT/IAP), email message sent to Carlos Flávio (associate editor of ESDA/DSA), August 23, 2019.

  15. F. Greenleaf, Terra da esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of hope: growth of the Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 30.

  16. Ibid.

  17. Haller E. Stach Schünemann, “O tempo do fim: uma história social da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia no Brasil” [End of times: a social story of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil] (Doctor’s thesis, Methodist University of São Paulo, 2002), 160.

  18. R. G. Canedo, Uma semente de esperança: história da estrutura denominacional [Seed of hope: history of the denominational structure] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015), 50.

  19. F. Greenleaf, Terra da esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of hope: growth of the Adventist Church in South America] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 30.

  20. Edegar Link, email message sent to Renato Gross, November 9, 2016.

  21. Related or belonging to the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Accessed on July 23, 2019, http://bit.ly/2K4Dh2K.

  22. O. Fonseca, ed., Associação Sul Rio-Grandense – 100 anos de Fé, Pioneirismo e Ação [Rio Grande do Sul Conference - 100 years of Faith, Pioneering and Action] (Porto Alegre, RS: Rio Grande do Sul Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, n.d), 25.

  23. Paulo Cesar de Azevedo, “O ensino adventista de nível médio no Brasil” [High School Adventist education in Brazil], in: A educação adventista no Brasil: uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist Education in Brazil: A Story of Adventures and Miracles], org. A. R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Unaspress, 2004), 33.

  24. F. Bertotti, ed., 100 anos de fé pioneirismo e missão [100 years of faith, pioneering, and mission] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 33.

  25. “Brazilian Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1911), 125; “South American Division of the General Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1921), 118. For more information about Central Brazil Union Conference, see the ESDA article of this Church Administrative Unit.

  26. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1926), 176.

  27. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1931), 242.

  28. Paulo Cesar de Azevedo, “O ensino adventista de nível médio no Brasil” [High School Adventist education in Brazil], in: A educação adventista no Brasil: uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist Education in Brazil: A Story of Adventures and Miracles], org. A. R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Unaspress, 2004), 33, 35, 39.

  29. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1985), 312.

  30. Executive Board Minute of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, November 1st, 1984, vote no. 84-588.

  31. “Nova União Sul Inaugura Sede Administrativa” [New South Union Conference Opens Administrative Headquarters], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1986, 18.

  32. Paulo Pinheiro, “União Sul Brasileira: Menos Espaço Para Evangelizar Melhor” [South Brazil Union Conference: Less Space For Better Evangelizing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1986. 44-45.

  33. Ibid.

  34. “Central Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1986), 267.

  35. Executive Board Minute of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, November 1st, 1984, vote no. 84-588. Yes, it’s somewhat confusing, but that’s what happened.

  36. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1986), 286.

  37. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1987), 289.

  38. Paulo Pinheiro, “União Sul Brasileira: Menos Espaço Para Evangelizar Melhor” [South Brazil Union Conference: Less Space For Better Evangelizing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1986, 44-45.

  39. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016; SBUC Secretary, email message to Renato Gross, April 24, 2018.

  40. “South Brazil Union Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1986), 286-288.

  41. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016; SBUC Secretary, email menssage to Renato Gross, April 24, 2018; Paulo Pinheiro, “União Sul Brasileira: Menos Espaço Para Evangelizar Melhor” [South Brazil Union Conference: Less Space For Better Evangelizing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1986, 45; “IACS Completará 60 Anos de Educação Integral” [IACS Celebrates 60 Years of Integral Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], (March 1988): 23; “SBUC: Comemorados 100 de Educação Adventist” [Celebrated 100 Years of Adventist Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1996, 13-14.

  42. “North Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 279; “South Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1990), 281.

  43. “Crescimento da Igreja” [Church Growth], 2nd Five-Yearly Assembly – 1991-1995, February 12-14, 1996, 19.

  44. “Educação” [Education], 2nd Five-Yearly Assembly – 1991-1995, February 12-14, 1996, 16.

  45. “Ministério Pessoal” [Personal Ministry], 2nd Five-Yearly Assembly – 1991-1995, February 12-14, 1996, 16.

  46. “ADRA,” 2nd Five-Yearly Assembly – 1991-1995, February 12-14, 1996, 18.

  47. “Presidência” [Presidency], 2nd Five-Yearly Assembly – 1991-1995, February 12-14, 1996, 15.

  48. “Presidência” [Presidency], 4th Five-Yearly Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference, November 28-30, 2005, 5.

  49. “South Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2000), 276.

  50. Ibid.

  51. “Evangelismo” [Evangelism], 4th Five-Yearly Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference, November 28-30, 2005, 6.

  52. “Missão Global” [Global Mission], 4th Five-Yearly Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference, November 17-18, 2005.

  53. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016; Rubens Lessa, “Mesa Plenária Histórica: DSA Cria Nova União e Reafirma Programa de Evangelismo Integrado” [Historical Round Table: SAD Creates New Union and Confirms Integrated Evangelism Program], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 2004, 21-23.

  54. “Ata da 1ª Assembleia Ordinária Denominacional da ACSR” [1st Denominational Ordinary Assembly Minute of the ACSR], Article XV, clause 1, Regulamento Interno da Associação Central Sul Rio-grandense da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Internal Regulation of the Central Rio Grande do Sul Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church] (Porto Alegre, RS, n.d), 14-15.

  55. “South Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 293.

  56. “Central Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2011), 302.

  57. “North Santa Catarina Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2013), 292.

  58. “West Parana Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2014), 294.

  59. Anilce B. Littke, email message to Renato Gross, November 29, 2016.

  60. Ibid.

  61. Carlise Catarina Antal, email message to Renato Gross, November 29, 2016.

  62. Ibid.

  63. Herbert Gruber (financial director of Santa Catarina Conference), email message to Renato Gross, December 2nd, 2016.

  64. Ibid.

  65. Evangelist Canvasser is the missionary that “builds his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public publications which are published and approved by the Church, with the objective of conveying to his fellow men and women the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Accessed on August 30, 2018, http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  66. Carlise Catarina Antal, email message to Renato Gross, November 29, 2016.

  67. “West Parana Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 255.

  68. “Hope Impact is a program that motivates the reading and provides the annual mass distribution of books on the Seventh-day Adventists part in the whole South American territory.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/2WZNdzY.

  69. “Caleb Mission Project is a volunteer program, social service and testimonies that challenge the Adventist youth to devote their vacations to evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to empower the small congregations and bring new people to the kingdom of God.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  70. “Breaking the Silence is an educational project that prevents abuse and domestic violence and is promoted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church every year in eight different countries in South America, (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay) since 2002.” Accessed on October 9, 2019, https://bit.ly/2HFxj8K; Douglas Pessoa, “Planejamento do Quebrando o Silêncio envolve vereadores de Santo Ângelo, RS” [Breaking the Silence planning involves Santo Ângelo councilmen], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], August 18, 2019, accessed on July 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2YA0CTc.

  71. Project Christian Summer School for Children is carried out by the South American Seventh-day Adventist Church with the objective of taking the Gospel to the children in a creative and instructive way. This project has games, songs, Bible lessons, stories, handcraft work, study of nature, temperance, and health. “Aulas extras” [Extra Classes]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 2011, 27; Luciene Bonfim, “Comunidades paranaenses são beneficiadas com trabalho da Missão Calebe” [Parana communities benefit from Mission Caleb work], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 23, 2019, accessed on July 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2MpYgjm.

  72. Luciene Bonfim, “Em Curitiba livro missionário é entregue pelo serviço do CéuDeux Carteiros da Esperança” [“Missionary book is handed out in Curitiba by the CéuDeux service of Hope Mailmen”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventistas News], May 28, 2019, accessed on July 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2JE4Ml3.

  73. Luciene Bonfim, “Comunidades paranaenses são beneficiadas com trabalho da Missão Calebe” [Parana communities benefit from Mission Caleb work], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 23, 2019, accessed on July 29, 2019, http://bit.ly/2MpYgjm.

  74. Charles Rampanelli, email message to Renato Gross, April 26, 2016. For more detailed information about all presidents, secretaries, and treasurers, consult the yearbooks from 1986 to 2018.

  75. For more information about South Brazil Union Conference access the website: asp.org.br, or on social media – Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @adventistasasp, and YouTube: Adventistas Sul.

×

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira. "South Brazil Union Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGQW.

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira. "South Brazil Union Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGQW.

Gross, Renato, Samuel Wesley Pereira de Oliveira (2021, January 10). South Brazil Union Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGQW.