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East São Paulo Conference facade.

Photo courtesy of East São Paulo Conference Archives.

East São Paulo Conference

By Daniella Cristina dos Santos Silva, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena, Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze, and Milena Guimarães

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Daniella Cristina dos Santos Silva

Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena

Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze

Milena Guimarães

The East São Paulo Conference is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church located in the territory of Central Brazil Union Conference. It is headquartered at 340 Coronel Bento José de Carvalho Street with Zip Code 03516-010 in the Vila Matilde neighborhood in the city of São Paulo, state of São Paulo, Brazil.1

The East São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulista Leste or APL) covers the eastern and northern areas of the city of São Paulo. The total population of the area is 7,019,720 inhabitants, and the number of Adventists is 38,421 people. The average is one Adventist per 182 inhabitants.2 In the region, there are 268 congregations, and they are organized in 54 pastoral districts: Água Rasa, Belém, Burgo Paulista, Caieiras, Casa Verde, Chabilândia, Cidade Patriarca, Conjunto Cidade Tiradentes, Conjunto José Bonifácio, Conjunto Teotônio Vilela, Francisco Morato, Franco da Rocha, Freguesia do Ó, Guaianases, Itaim Paulista, Itaquera, Jaçanã, Jaraguá, Jardim das Oliveiras, Jardim Iguatemi, Jardim Maia, Jardim Maringá, Jardim Peri Alto, Jardim Planalto, Jardim Rincão, Jardim Robru, Jardim Santo André, Jardim Tremembé, Jardim Vilma Flor, Lauzane Paulista, Mandaqui, Missão Global Hispano, Morro Doce, Novo Tempo, Parque Paulistano, Penha, Perus, Pirituba, Ponte Rasa, São Mateus, São Miguel Paulista, Tatuapé, Tucuruvi, Vila Alpina, Vila Carrão, Vila Formosa, Vila Jacuí, Vila Maria, Vila Matilde, Vila Medeiros, Vila Nova Cachoeirinha, Vila Ré, Vila Rica, and Vila Verde.3

In the region of East São Paulo Conference there are seven school units of the Adventist Educational Network, and they offer from Early Childhood Education to High School. They are: Engenheiro Goulart Adventist Academy, with 344 students; São Miguel Paulista Adventist Academy, with 701 students; Tucuruvi Adventist Academy, with 717 students; Vila Alpina Adventist Academy, with 784 students; Vila Matilde Adventist Academy, with 1,194 students; Vila Nova Cachoeirinha Adventist Academy, with 779 students and Vila Matilde Kids Adventist Academy, with 166 students. All these units are in the city of São Paulo and serve a total of 4,685 students.4

For the operation of all its institutions and departments, the APL has a total of 663 staff members, of whom 546 are employees, 32 are credentialed workers, 11 are licensed, 59 are ordained pastors, and 15 are licensed pastors.5

The Origin of the Adventist Work in the Conference Territory

The origin of Adventist work in the state of São Paulo dates to 1906 when São Paulo Mission was organized. At that time, some foreign Adventist missionaries envisioned a prosperous future for the Adventist Church in Brazil. A group of 22 pioneers was determined to take the Word of God to the inhabitants even in the midst of difficulties and challenges at the time. And it was in the city of Rio Claro in the state of São Paulo that the Adventist message began to be preached, bringing hope for a better world. It was there that the first baptism took place in the waters of Piracicaba River. Later, in September 1910, the first Adventist news report regarding SDA activities in the city of São Paulo was recorded – although there are reports mentioning the presence of canvassers in the city since the turn of the 19th century.6

In the following year (1911), Pastor Ricardo Suessmann started his pastoral work in the city of São Paulo where he stayed for about a year and a half. The first services were held in his own home located on Maria Marcolina Street, and later, on Nova de São José Street. The result of this work was evident on August 10, 1912, the date on which the first baptismal ceremony was held in the capital in the Tietê River in the Ponte Grande region. Four people had accepted the Adventist message.7

A few years later, on January 17, 1915, the first Adventist temple was inaugurated in the capital, having 25 baptized members. At the time, John Lipke was the only pastor authorized by the Church to perform baptisms. In December 1916, Pastor Ricardo Suessmann, who had left the region some time earlier, returned to São Paulo to work as president of São Paulo Mission. Due to the expansion of the work and the success in that period, on December 12, 1922, the Mission came to be called São Paulo Conference, assuming greater responsibilities before the worldwide Adventist Church. At the time, the Conference was directed by Pastor H. B. Westcott.8

In 1937, the São Paulo Conference was already providing assistance to at least eight churches with about 2,460 members.9 Due to the development of the field in that period, in the first half of 1940, a church was built in the region of Vila Matilde, thus fulfilling the desire of many Adventists in that area. Pastor J. L. Brown, then a member of the administrative team of the Union, was the one who performed the temple dedication ceremony. From this inauguration in Vila Matilde, the Adventist message was officially established in the region, currently served by APL.10

Ten years after the inauguration of Vila Matilde Church, some workers from the São Paulo Conference conducted a series of meetings in the Tucuruvi neighborhood. For two years, the team of workers remained in the region, giving Bible studies and, in April 1952, the neighborhood then had a group of 130 Adventists.11 Another avenue of evangelism that stood out in this region was developed through the program “A Voz da profecia” [“The Voice of Prophecy”].12 In 1954, it was possible to contemplate the results of the work being carried out by this program in the Itaquera neighborhood. Through it, a young woman got to know the message of the Gospel and then started looking for a temple to attend and worship. As soon as she found it, she started regularly attending the worship services. After participating in a preparatory class, she was baptized with three other Itaquera residents. The baptism was performed at the Adventist Church in Brás neighborhood in the city of São Paulo.13

Little by little, new locations in São Paulo were reached by the Adventist message. This was the case, for example, of the Casa Verde neighborhood where, in 1960, there was a group of 30 Adventists. There, the staff of the program “A Voz da Profecia,” under the coordination of pastors Alcides Campolongo and Roberto Rabello, conducted a large series of meetings that resulted in the baptism of 135 people. This baptismal ceremony was considered the largest one in the history of Adventism in Brazil for that time.14 One of the baptized people was a young man named Ademar Penteado who, years later, joined one of the formations of Arautos do Rei [The King’s Heralds] quartet from the “A Voz da Profecia” ministry.15

During the 1960s, the number of members in the São Paulo Conference grew, and in January of that year, 12,264 members and 47 organized churches across the state were registered.16 Six years later, in January 1966, the number rose to 92 organized churches and 22,837 Adventists.17 As a result, new locations in the region covered by the present APL were reached by the Adventist Church such as the Pirituba, Jaraguá, Perus, and Francisco Morato’s neighborhoods in the city of São Paulo and the city of Franco da Rocha. In the Pirituba neighborhood in 1970, there were already seven congregations, four groups (Francisco Morato, Caieiras, Perus and Parada de Taipas) and three organized churches (Pirituba, Jaraguá and Franco da Rocha).18

Due to the advancement in the preaching of the Adventist message in different parts of the city of São Paulo, by 1977, the number of members served by São Paulo Conference had already risen to 51,122 people.19 This growth made it necessary to reorganize the missionary field in order to better serve the region. Until that time, the East São Paulo Conference (presently the São Paulo Conference) and the West São Paulo Conference (presently the Central São Paulo Conference) had already been established in the territory of South Brazil Union Conference (presently the Central Brazil Union Conference). Thus, in 1982, the present East São Paulo Conference was inaugurated which emerged due to the reorganization of the missionary field of the present São Paulo Conference, where its former name originated.20

The Conference Organizational History

On May 14, 1982, a study meeting took place at the USB about the reorganization of the field. At this meeting, issues such as the release of more resources for pastoral and evangelistic work were considered, and studies previously carried out in the areas of communication, social assistance, and education were evaluated.21 Later, on June 30 of that same year, Associação Paulista [the São Paulo Conference], presently the Associação Paulistana (in English, it continued to be called São Paulo Conference), considered the request for reorganization made by the Union. Through vote no. 82-243, it was approved that the reorganization of the field would be effective from January 1, 1983. The new Conference, which until then had been informally called North São Paulo Conference, was officially named the East São Paulo Conference. This change was made considering the logic, reasonableness, and coherence of the suggestion given by the Brethren who lived in the East Zone of the city of São Paulo and in the Paraíba Valley.22

The official APL organizational meeting took place on September 6, 1982, at the Moema Adventist Church in the Indianópolis neighborhood of São Paulo. The assembly, chaired by Pastor Darcy Mendes de Borba (then president of the USB) was attended by delegates and representatives from the 24 districts of the new Conference.23 The delegates met in one of the Telepaz building rooms24 and, after some clarifications and the request for guidance from the Holy Spirit, Pastor Osmundo Graciliano dos Santos Junior was elected president of the new field.25 The new Conference was responsible for the Adventist work in the eastern and northern regions of the city of São Paulo, the Paraíba River valley, and the northern coast. At the time, these regions were home to a population of 7,181,906 inhabitants. In all of this territory, there were at least 67 churches and a total of 19,398 members to be served. The first headquarters of East São Paulo Conference was located at 178 Edgard de Azevedo Soares Street in the Vila Matilde neighborhood of São Paulo.26

The first call made by APL was registered on March 29, 1983. Pastor Laércio Mazzaro was called to pastor the district of Vila Matilde. On the same day, some licenses and credentials were granted to pastors who were already working in the territory. The crendentialed ones were to Davi Marski, Jahir Ferrari, and Oliveira Joaquim Pires, and the licensed ones were to Gerson Pereira dos Santos, João Augusto Cesar, Joel Eisenhut, Oliveiros Pinto Ferreira, and Timoteo Ávila Pinho. APL made its first call to the students who had recently graduated from the Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary (Seminário Adventista Latino-Americano de Teologia or SALT), on September 13, 1983. The first aspiring pastors called to the ministry on the occasion were: Antonio Elio de Souza, Benedito Tassolo, and Ismael Forti. They started to work in 1984. The first candidates ordained by the East São Paulo Conference were Edilson Valiante, Haroldo Adasz, Jeovah da Silva Goulart, and Ronaldo de Oliveira.27

In that first year of activities, the APL provided assistance to 24 districts: Belém, Bragança Paulista, Casa Verde, Freguesia do Ó, Guarulhos, Itaquera, Jacareí, Jardim Utinga, Lorena, Mogi das Cruzes, Penha, Pirituba, São José dos Campos, São Miguel Paulista, Suzano, Taubaté, Tucuruvi, Ubatuba, Vila Alpina, Vila Galvão, Vila Industrial, Vila Maria, Vila Matilde, and Vila Ré. Due to the growth of the field, a rearrangement study was carried out for the following year, resulting in the creation of two more districts: Itaim Paulista and Jardim Cidade Cumbica.28

The first year of work was very challenging. The target for baptisms set up by the South Brazil Union Conference was 1,800 people. Thus, the work of evangelization began with much dedication and planning. The results were according to the efforts, and each month, many people were reached. At the end of that year, 5,096 new Adventists were baptized thanks to the efforts of the entire APL team and the members of each church who participated in the evangelization. The large number of baptisms contributed to the creation of five new districts. This was an important year, not only because of the considerable growth in the field, but also due to the new challenges and changes that took place. In that same year, the vote for the operation of São Miguel Paulista Adventist Academy – located at 270 Rosaria Street (currently 230) – was registered and made official.29

In the second semester of 1985, APL I Triennial Assembly took place.30 At this meeting, some suggestions for changes were registered. Through vote no. 85-149, which was to be carried out during the following three-year period, they were to: build the Conference headquarters; build Vila Matilde Educational Center; get an area for the Youth camp headquarters, move forward with the preaching of the Gospel in the neighborhoods of Tatuapé and Santana; build two social assistance centers (one in the capital and another in the Paraíba Valley); open a new Home and Health Educational Service store (SELS) in the city of Guarulhos; reactivate the Stewardship program with APL members; and move forward the preaching of the message in the city of Aparecida do Norte.31 All of that was to keep the field focused in its mission and to allow even further expansion.

From 1988 to 1991, the APL experienced an exponential development, undergoing important changes that were mainly administrative. These changes included the computerization of the Secretariat system, stability in the Treasury area, and an increase in the number of Pathfinders. In the ministerial area, pastoral evangelism meetings were held, and some projects were created such as “APL 1000.”32 In this triennium, the field reached a target of 2,056 baptisms and had 33,375 members, 39 pastoral districts, and 192 congregations.33

In the Asset Expansion sector, some goals for the following three-year period were highlighted and proposed, and among them were: the construction and conclusion of schools (such as Vila Galvão Adventist Academy); the grant and aid for 63 congregations; moving the offices of East São Paulo Conference and Home and Health Educational Service to their own headquarters; acquiring and/or building a pastoral residence each year; stimulating professional qualification in the areas of office and teaching; computerizing the expansion sector; the update of the real estate archive to develop the engineering and legal areas; and holding training meetings for personnel in the accounting sector.34 The intention of APL leadership with these proposals was fostering continuous growth, strengthening itself, and making an intelligent investment for the future.

In 1994, in its 11th anniversary, the administrative headquarters started to operate at its current address: 340 Coronel Bento José de Carvalho Street in the Vila Matilde neighborhood in São Paulo.35 By 1997, the field had grown considerably, mainly in the number of members and in financial income. The transmission of the Adventist message via satellite was one of the tools that helped the growth of the field, resulting in a significant number of baptisms. With a greater number of Adventists, more schools were also needed, and in that same year, the Vila Nova Cachoeirinha Adventist Academy was opened. Thus, in 1997, there were already 35,239 members and 242 congregations in the APL territory.36

In those days, members of the Adventist Church in the eastern region of São Paulo were heavily involved in social projects so that 18,000 people received needed medicines and about 1.5 million kilos of food were donated. In addition, aiming to reach people affected by cataracts (a disease that causes blindness often in the elderly), a taskforce project called “Mutirão de Cataratas” was also carried out, making appointments and referring those in need of a surgery. At least 552 people benefited from the project.37

In that same period, data on the growth in number of Adventists in APL territory indicated that a reorganization was necessary. Thus, in March 2001, the 1st APL Extraordinary Assembly took place in order to discuss the splitting of the field and the creation of a new administrative unit.38 On this occasion, all delegates present decided on the reorganization of the APL and the creation of São Paulo Valley Mission (presently the São Paulo Valley Conference – Associação Paulista do Vale or APV), which was headquartered in the city of São José dos Campos. This new administrative unit soon began to serve 92 congregations and 19,762 Adventists.39

The reorganization of the field led to a reorganization on several missionary fronts in the APL, such as the canvassing work. From 2003 to 2004, Denominational Canvassing was instituted with the objective of having at least one canvasser in each district to disseminate and sell evangelistic materials to members as well as assisting them. The APL field continued to expand, and this growth was reflected in the increase of pastoral districts to 36 in 2005, and in the highest monthly tithing value in the history of the field: US$ 3,002,006.60. Another area that grew successfully during this period was the Pathfinder and Adventurer ministries. At the end of 2005, there were 5,000 Pathfinders and 1.8 thousand Adventurers throughout the APL territory.40

Another benefit of the territory reorganization was the improvement in service to Adventists in the eastern region of São Paulo. This was reflected in the number of baptisms from 2005 to 2009, with 7,084 people baptized in addition to the 15 new churches being organized.41 The outcome was partly due to combined efforts including the distribution of fliers and missionary books as well as the evangelism series’ conducted by pastors Mark Finley, Luís Gonçalves, and Fernando Iglesias. In that same period, the APL also invested in the acquisition of satellite dishes for churches with the aim of transmitting evangelistic meetings via satellite as well as in the renovation and construction of temples.42

As of 2010, the APL began to invest heavily in the personal development of members and in their training to serve the Church, emphasizing missional development. Thus, the APL Leadership School was created, offering courses in partnership with Andrews University. In this context, the Conference offered the Lay Leadership Seminar, which graduated 70 people from its first class (2012). In the following year (2013), vacancies were opened for six more simultaneous classes. The groups of leaders were trained according to the reality of their churches and with the intention to foster their own growth once the courses taught were for pastors, elders, leaders, and members.43

As new leaders were prepared, its outcome was reflected by a higher number of new congregations arising. About 260 professionals became directly involved in planting new churches, and by 2013, the Conference inaugurated, on average, one church every 16 days, a great achievement for the work of evangelization in the field. About US$ 11.7 million were also invested in evangelistic actions, and the project “1 Dia com Deus” [“A Day with God”] was carried out44 with more than 20 meetings and free distribution of handouts on the subject to about 5,000 people. Furthermore, 10 new districts were organized, and a dream highly anticipated for more than 10 years came true: the construction of Vila Matilde Adventist Academy (then the largest school in the field) with an average capacity for 1,300 students and an auditorium for 1,000 people.45

The emphasis on missional development also focused on the Church service to the community. In this regard, some projects were developed, such as “Gol de Esperança” [“Goal of Hope”] (free sports classes followed by Bible study) and “Pet Solidário” [“Solidarity Pet”] (free pet care in the churches carried out at an appropriate time and place). With a similar focus, the new structure of the ASA (Ação Solidária Adventista) [“Adventist Solidarity Action”] allowed the opening of more than 200 social assistance service posts in the community, with about US$ 7,920,000.00 allocated for community service and more than 120,000 people assisted at community fairs.46

As of 2013, the APL reorganized its territory, dividing the field into eight regions, aiming at better monitoring and service to the regions by department pastors. As it is established in one of the largest cities in the world, the Conference encouraged the formation of study groups in Urban Mission both for pastors and members, aiming to awaken the recognition of an increasingly urban world reality with faster changes. In addition, the field started to work under the motto “Desafio 1+1” [“Challenge 1+1”],47 experiencing the reality of discipleship and multiplication.48

It was under this evangelistic perspective that, in 2016, the APL inaugurated the Hispanic Central Adventist Church in the Brás neighborhood financial support from the Brazil Publishing House (Casa Publicadora Brasileira or CPB). The Church was built to serve the large number of Hispanics living in the Brás region. At the time, the Adventist Hispanic Community had six congregations, five groups, and one organized church.49

In order to motivate ministries more focused on the development and multiplication of disciples, the “Compassion”50 project emerged, which in 2016 emphasized the theme “Meu Talento, Meu Ministério” [“My Talent, My Ministry”] and, in 2017, “Ministérios Urbanos que Transformam” [“Urban Ministries that Transform”]. Another project developed was “Missão Calebe” [“Caleb Mission”]51 through which events were held in schools as well as many evangelistic campaigns. In addition to these two projects, several actions were developed through “Geração 148” [“Generation 148”].52 In order to better serve and to reach new generations, from this quadrennial onwards, the Youth, Pathfinder, and Adventurer departments were divided. Thus, one department pastor was responsible for the Pathfinder and Adventurer departments, and another one for the Youth and Music departments, which provided better results in these two areas.53

In the triennium from 2014 to 2017, the APL developed and encouraged several programs to boost missionary activity and reach more people with the message of salvation. The following programs were held: “Caravanas da Esperança” [“Caravans of Hope”]54, with Pastor Luís Gonçalves; “Encontros de Amigos da Novo Tempo” [“Meetings with Friends from Hope Channel Brazil”], with pastors from the Channel station; Holy Week evangelism in 4,771 places;55 harvest evangelism in 1,171 points56, carried out by pastors, members, students, and guests; and the “Impacto Esperança” [“Hope Impact”] project,57 with 1,227,704 missionary books distributed. During this period, almost 1,000 small groups were meeting weekly in the homes of members and, as a result of all this effort, 11,517 new disciples were made, and 45 new congregations were established.58

Many actions were carried out aiming at spiritual and family maturation and strengthening, such as the “Pais de joelhos, Filhos de pé” [“Kneeling Parents, Standing Children”] project59 and the ECC or Encontro de Casais com Cristo (Couples with Christ Encounter). In addition, there was an encouragement for more students to enroll in Adventist Academies. Social actions were also held to relieve pain and suffering, such as those carried out through the “Programa Emergencial de Inverno” or PEI [“Emergency Winter Program”]– in partnership with São Paulo City Hall, in which countless homeless people were assisted.60 Similarly, in the educational area, the “12 alunos e 1 missão” [“12 students and 1 mission”] project took place, which promotes discipleship and testimony among students.61

Regarding the development of missionary work, from January 2014 to September 2017, the number of districts increased from 48 to 53 in the Conference territory. In addition, the number of congregations rose from 129 to 141, and the number of members increased from 33,674 to 37,903 people. There have been many changes that have taken place in these 37 years of East São Paulo Conference’s existence. In everything, God has been leading this church administrative unit to get to where it is today for the Adventist work in the state of São Paulo. The APL employees praise and thank God for divine guidance in every detail since its beginning.62

Looking back, APL leadership notes that some lessons can be learned from its history. The first is that, when the Church is organized, it always grows. This statement is based on the many field reconfigurations of São Paulo Conference and APL itself to form other missionary fields. Field leaders believe that “with God, sharing becomes a visible multiplication of His blessings.” The second lesson is “not to be afraid to think big.” Despite the limitations of each period, results were obtained both in the number of students and in schools that were inaugurated, generating resources for new advances. The third lesson is that bold projects bring growth. Projects for planting churches and training leaders, under the emphasis “Movidos pela Palavra” [“Moved by the Word”], as well as the encouragement of special ministries, resulted in high rates of baptism in the APL territory.63

However, the Conference leadership understands that, in order to fulfill its mission, there are still challenges to be faced. The first one is Brazil's socioeconomic instability, which makes migrants from all regions of the country to concentrate in the APL territory, looking for better living conditions. However, due to the high cost of living in São Paulo, many of these migrants end up returning to their home states, which results in a great loss of mature members in the faith. Furthermore, unemployment, the decrease in services for the self-employed workers, the market decline for entrepreneurs, the increase in (life) costs, the currency devaluation--everything ends up impacting tithes and offerings. Another challenge in this context is the growing secularization in the city of São Paulo, a reality that requires constant attention in the processes of evangelization. Families and educational systems are directly affected by such realities that continue to challenge the Church missionary efforts in the region.64

Even amidst these challenges, by 2021, the field goal is to reach a number of 55 pastoral districts, 75 working pastors, 12,000 baptisms, and 5,050 students enrolled in the educational units, from elementary to high school, in addition to inaugurating 30 church buildings and organizing 20 groups. In order to keep making solid progress in the coming years, APL will continue to work following the motto “Movidos Pela Palavra” [“Steered by the Word”]. The Church in the region is expected to be known as the “people of the Bible,” aligned with the Adventist Church mission all over the world, making disciples through fellowship, relationship, and mission.65

Chronology of Administrative Leaders66

Presidents: Osmundo Graciliano dos Santos Jr. (1982-1984); Arno Henrique Köhler (1984-1990); Paulo Stabenow (1990-2001); Alcy Francisco de Oliveira (2001-2009); Erlo Braun (2009-2014); Aguinaldo Leônidas Guimarães (2014-Present).

Secretaries: Vilson Paulo Keller (1982-1984); Jairo de Oliveira (1984-1985); Adamir Alberto (1985); Antenor Cruz da Costa (1986-1989); Alcy Francisco de Oliveira (1989-1990); Edson Rosa (1990-1991); Levi Borrelli (1991-1994); Eradi da Silva Guimarães (1995-2001); Erlo Braun (2001-2009); Manoel Pereira de Andrade (2009-2013); Aguinaldo Leônidas Guimarães (2013-2014); Flávio Ferraz (2014-2017); Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze (2017-Present).

Treasurers: Vilson Paulo Keller (1982-1984); Jairo de Oliveira (1984-1985); Adamir Alberto (1985); Alcy Francisco de Oliveira (1986-2001); Elnio Álvares de Freitas (2001-2003); Hugo Ernesto Quiroga (2004-2009); Marcos José de Sousa (2009-2019); João Adilson Rodrigues (2019-Present).67

Sources

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Azevedo, Roberto. “O Maior Batismo da História no Brasil” [“The Largest Baptism in Brazil’s History”]. Revista Adventista 56, no. 8 (August 1961): 25-27.

Beckedorf, Roberto. “Frutos da Voz da Profecia em Itaquera” [“Fruits of the Voice of Prophecy in Itaquera”]. Revista Adventista 50, no. 6 (June 1955): 24-25.

Belz, Rodolfo. “A Seara Paulista” [“São Paulo Harvest”]. Revista Adventista, 35, no. 9(September 1940): 11.

Burigato, Ilho. “Ecos do Distrito de Pirituba” [“Echoes from Pirituba neighborhood”]. Revista Adventista 66, no. 5 (May 1971). 29.

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“Concílio e evangelismo são os destaques” [“Council and evangelism are the highlights”]. Revista Adventista, August 1993.

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Fagundes, Evellin. “Caravana da Esperança passará por Itabuna” [“Caravan Hope will pass through Itabuna”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 14, 2016.

Geofusion. https://geofusion.com.br/.

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Martins, Michelle. “Adventistas e Prefeitura de SP inauguram abrigo emergencial de inverno” [“Adventists and SP City Hall inaugurate winter emergency shelter”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 19, 2017.

Martins, Michelle. “Central Hispana é inaugurada no Brás, em SP” [“Hispanic Central Church opens in Brás, in SP”]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), March 14, 2016.

Martins, Michelle. “O poder da compaixão” [“The power of compassion”]. Revista Adventista 112, no. 1321 (May 2017): 23.

Martins, Michelle. “Sem quimioterapia, homem é curado de câncer após mudança na alimentação e orações” [“Without chemotherapy, a man is healed from cancer after diet change and prayers”]. Notícias Adventistas [News-Adventists] (Online), September 22, 2016.

Minutes of the Extraordinary Assembly of East São Paulo Conference, March 4, 2001.

Minutes of the III Assembly of East São Paulo Conference.

Minutes of the VIII Assembly of East São Paulo Conference, 2009.

Mouad, Nelson. “O Evangelismo na Linha de Frente” [“Frontline Evangelism”]. Revista Adventista 48, no. 4 (April 1952): 14-23.

Novo Tempo [Hope Channel Brazil]. https://www.novotempo.com/.

Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website]. http://www.adventistas.org/pt.

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“Rio: Novo ‘Arautos do Rei’ Inicia Atividades” [“Rio: new ‘King’s Heralds’ starts activities”]. Revista Adventista, April 1979.

Rosa, Edson, ed., 100 anos Conduzindo Vidas em São Paulo [100 years Leading Lives in São Paulo]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006.

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São Paulo Conference Minutes, September 6, 1982.

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VII Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

VIII Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

Westphal, Gislaine and Lucas Rocha. “Desafio 1+1 envolverá todas as ações dos adventistas em São Paulo” [“Challenge 1+1 will involve all the actions of Adventists in São Paulo”]. Notícias Adventistas [News-Adventists] (Online), August 21, 2014.

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Notes

  1. Geofusion, accessed June 10, 2019, https://geofusion.com.br/.

  2. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “East São Paulo Conference,” accessed April 15, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VvXa8L.

  3. ACMS – Adventist Church Management System.

  4. Report by the APL Department of Education.

  5. APS – Adventist Payroll System; ASAS – Sistema Adventista de Administração e Secretaria [Adventist Administration and Secretariat System].

  6. Edson Rosa, ed., 100 anos Conduzindo Vidas em São Paulo [100 years Leading Lives in São Paulo] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2006), 23-27.

  7. Ibid.

  8. Ibid.

  9. Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “História da Associação Paulistana” [“São Paulo Conference History”], accessed May 23, 2019, https://bit.ly/30SffQq.

  10. Rodolfo Belz, “A Seara Paulista” [“São Paulo Harvest”], Revista Adventista 35, no. 9 (September 1940): 11.

  11. Nelson Mouad, “O Evangelismo na Linha de Frente” [“Frontline Evangelism”], Revista Adventista 48, no. 4 (April 1952): 14-23.

  12. “The Voice of Prophecy is the oldest evangelical program on Brazilian radio, starting in 1943. Since its beginning, it has had the musical participation of Arautos do Rei [The King’s Heralds] quartet. Currently, the program has its version, also for TV, and is presented by Pastor Gilson Brito, who has been in the pastoral ministry for over 30 years. Biblical sermons that present the message of hope and salvation.” Hope Channel Brazil, “A Voz da Profecia” [“The Voice of Prophecy”], accessed January 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2RzGrRh.

  13. Roberto Beckedorf, “Frutos da Voz da Profecia em Itaquera” [“Fruits of the Voice of Prophecy in Itaquera”], Revista Adventista 50, no. 6 (June 1955): 24-25.

  14. Roberto Azevedo, “O Maior Batismo da História no Brasil” [“The Largest Baptism in Brazil's History”], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 56 (August 1961): 25-27.

  15. “Rio: Novo ‘Arautos do Rei’ Inicia Atividades” [“Rio: new ‘King’s Heralds’ starts activities”], Revista Adventista, April 1979, 32. To learn more about the history of Arautos do Rei quartet, see the article “A Voz da Profecia – Brasil” [“The Voice of Prophecy – Brazil”] in this Encyclopedia.

  16. “São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1960), 168.

  17. “São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1965-1966), 209.

  18. Ilho Burigato, “Ecos do Distrito de Pirituba” [“Echoes from Pirituba neighborhood”], Revista Adventista 66, no. 5 (May 1971): 29.

  19. “São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1978), 272.

  20. Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “História da Associação Paulistana” [“São Paulo Conference History”], accessed May 23, 2019, https://bit.ly/30SffQq.

  21. São Paulo Conference Minutes, June 17, 1982.

  22. São Paulo Conference Minutes, June 30, 1982.

  23. São Paulo Conference Minutes, September 6, 1982.

  24. “It is an SDA telephone service that assists people who are in need of psychological, moral and spiritual support. Its working team has professional training in Psychology and Counseling.” Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista do Brasil [National Center of Adventist History (Brazil) Website], “Telepaz,” accessed February 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Tl06Uw.

  25. São Paulo Conference Minutes, September 6, 1982.

  26. “East São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1984), 308.

  27. East São Paulo Conference Minutes, 1982.

  28. Ibid.

  29. East São Paulo Conference Minutes, 1983.

  30. East São Paulo Conference Minutes, August 23, 1985.

  31. East São Paulo Conference Minutes, October 29, 1985.

  32. “The APL 1000 Project brought together pastors and elders with the aim of directing the church to participate in the mission of evangelizing. Even the newly baptized were encouraged to be involved in the evangelization process.” “Concílio e evangelismo são os destaques” [“Council and evangelism are the highlights”], Revista Adventista, August 1993, 19.

  33. Minutes of the III Assembly of East São Paulo Conference.

  34. Ibid.

  35. Report Book of the IV Triennial of East São Paulo Conference, 1992-1994.

  36. Report Book of the V Triennial of East São Paulo Conference, 1995-1997.

  37. VI Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  38. Minute of the Extraordinary Assembly of East São Paulo Conference, March 4, 2001.

  39. “São Paulo Paraiba Valley Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2003), 249.

  40. VII Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  41. Minute of the VIII Assembly of East São Paulo Conference, 2009.

  42. VIII Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  43. IX Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  44. “The 1 Day with God project was a spiritual revival retreat project, where the APL office and the churches took a day to pray and go even deeper into spiritual development.” Daniella Cristina (APL assistant secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), September 2, 2019.

  45. IX Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  46. Ibid.

  47. “The Challenge 1+1 project integrates actions that are already carried out by the church members. However, it goes beyond that, aligning such initiatives of members' actions with those promoted by the leaders of the institutions. This project emphasizes communion, relationship and mission.” Gislaine Westphal and Lucas Rocha, “Desafio 1+1 envolverá todas as ações dos adventistas em São Paulo” [“Challenge 1+1 will involve all the actions of Adventists in São Paulo”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], August 21, 2014, accessed on February 26, 2020, http://bit.ly/2MykxgQ.

  48. X Report Book of the East São Paulo Conference.

  49. Ibid., Michelle Martins, “Central Hispana é inaugurada no Brás, em SP” [“Central Hispanic Church opens in Brás, in SP”], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], March 14, 2016, accessed January 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2vjPQni.

  50. “Evento anual promovido pela APL para estímular a criação de novos ministérios” [“Annual event fostered by the APL to encourage the creation of new ministries”]. Michelle Martins, “O poder da compaixão” [“The power of compassion”], Revista Adventista 112, no. 1321 (May 2017): 23.

  51. “Caleb Mission project is a volunteer program, social service, and a witnessing that challenges the Adventist youth to dedicate their vacations to evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to strengthen the small congregations and gain new people for the kingdom of God.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “Missão Calebe 2020” [“Caleb Mission 2020”], accessed February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  52. X Report Book of the East São Paulo Conference; “Geração 148 [‘Generation 148’] is a youth project that is dedicated to the missionary work and has as its role model the Bible passage in Romans 14:8.” Geração148 [Generation 148], “Geração 148” [“Generation 148”], accessed June 6, 2019, http://g148.org.br/.

  53. X Report Book of the East São Paulo Conference.

  54. “The movement called Caravan of Hope is promoted by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and travels through cities in South America with the aim of presenting biblical themes applied to the present day to promote reflections and encourage participants to make good decisions.” Evellin Fagundes, “Caravana da Esperança passará por Itabuna [‘Caravan of Hope will pass through Itabuna’],” Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 14, 2016, accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2JIiogj.

  55. “Harvest evangelism in the Holy Week is a very special time to introduce Jesus and the life we find in Him through the Word of God. The purpose of this evangelism is to remember the sacrifice, death and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ on behalf of humanity.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “Semana Santa Evangelismo de Colheita e Semeadura” [“Harvest and Sowing Evangelism Holy Week”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2uMWoue.

  56. Harvest evangelism is a “Week of preaching the gospel in order to baptize. This project is carried out in the eight countries of South America and is based on the assumption that evangelism involves sowing, cultivation and harvesting.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “Evangelismo” [“Evangelism”], accessed February 26, 2020, http://bit.ly/2wNdIgs.

  57. The project “Hope Impact is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of the Seventh-day Adventist in the South American territory.” Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website], “Impacto Esperança” [“Hope Impact”], accessed February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO. 

  58. X Report Book of East São Paulo Conference.

  59. “‘Pais de Joelhos, Filhos em Pé’ [“Kneeling Parents, Standing Children”] is a 40-day devotional project, designed especially for parents. The aim is to give spiritual support to children through their parent's prayers and connection with God. By the end of the program, a Holy Communion with the attending families is held.” Michelle Martins, “Sem quimioterapia, homem é curado de câncer após mudança na alimentação e orações” [Without chemotherapy, a man is healed from cancer after diet change and prayers], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 22, 2016, accessed January 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Gj5WQr.

  60. “The Winter Emergency Program was a partnership that emerged in 2016 between the Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA) and the City Hall of São Paulo, with the objective of sheltering homeless people during the winter. The shelter administered by the SDA was located at 75 Comendador Nestor Pereira street, Canindé neighborhood.” Michelle Martins, “Adventistas e Prefeitura de SP inauguram abrigo emergencial de inverno” [Adventists and SP City Hall inaugurate winter emergency shelter], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 19, 2017, accessed January 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/2GkjhYD.

  61. X Report Book of the East São Paulo Conference.

  62. Ibid.

  63. Daniella Cristina (APL assistant secretary), email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA assistant editor), September 2, 2019.

  64. Ibid.

  65. Ibid.

  66. “East São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1984), 308-309; “East São Paulo Conference,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 230. For more details about all administrative leaders of the East São Paulo Conference, see the SDA yearbooks from 1982 to 2018.

  67. For more information about the APL, access their website at https://apl.adventistas.org/ or their social media on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @paulistaleste and Youtube: Associação Paulista Leste.

×

Silva, Daniella Cristina dos Santos, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena, Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze, Milena Guimarães. "East São Paulo Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed December 07, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIF8.

Silva, Daniella Cristina dos Santos, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena, Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze, Milena Guimarães. "East São Paulo Conference." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access December 07, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIF8.

Silva, Daniella Cristina dos Santos, Lucas Vítor Alves Rodrigues Sena, Luiz Otavio Martins Piazze, Milena Guimarães (2021, April 28). East São Paulo Conference. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved December 07, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIF8.