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Northwest Brazil Union Mission building.

Photo courtesy of Northwest Brazil Union Mission Archives.

Northwest Brazil Union Mission

By Adilson da Silva Vieira, and Ronivon da Silva dos Santos

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Adilson da Silva Vieira

Ronivon da Silva dos Santos

Northwest Brazil Union Mission (Uniao Noroeste Braziliera or UNoB) is an administrative unit of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, located in the territory of the South American Division. It is headquartered on 10 Ministro João Gonçalves de Araújo street, Zip Code 69.075-840, Distrito Industrial neighborhood, in the city of Manaus, in the state of Amazonas, Brazil.

The UNoB missionary area of activity covers the states of Amazonas, Roraima, Rondônia, and Acre, a vast geographical region that borders Guyana, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia. There, among a population estimated at 7,171,224 1, there are 173,630 Seventh-day Adventists, which makes an average of 41 Adventists per population.2 These members are distributed in 190 pastoral districts and organized in 1,794 congregations (974 churches and 820 groups), where they meet regularly. UNoB has 2,103 workers, including 226 pastors.3

This missionary field is organized in four administrative units, of which two are located in Manaus: Central Amazon Conference, with 44,660 members, spread in 209 congregations, among a population of approximately one million nine hundred thousand inhabitants; and Amazonas-Roraima Conference, with 66,896 members, distributed in 374 congregations, among a population of 2,537,000 inhabitants. The other two units are located in different cities in the state of Rondônia: West Amazon Conference, which is established in Porto Velho, with 34,549 members in 214 congregations, with an estimated population of 2,055,000 inhabitants; and South Rondônia Conference, which is established in Ji-Paraná, with 18,990 members in 137 congregations, among a population of 770,000 inhabitants.4

UNoB is also responsible for managing, in the health area, the Manaus Adventist Hospital, which is part of an international health network, and has been operating for more than one hundred years, with more than 700 units around the world, the Adventist Hospitals Network. Now due to investments in technology and staff, the Manaus Adventist Hospital is a medical reference in the region. In this hospital, about one thousand one hundred eight employees evangelize through the health area by providing medical care, which is offered 24 hours a day.5

In the communications field, TV Novo Tempo (Hope Channel Brazil) is present on an open channel in many cities in the UNoB area. Among them there are the Amazonian cities of Manaus, reached by the signal since August 28, 2014,6 in addition to Itacoatiara, Parintins, Maués, Manicoré, and Rio Preto da Eva. In 2015 the broadcaster reached the capital of the state of Roraima, the city of Boa Vista. In the state of Rondônia, the cities reached are Ji-Paraná, Cacoal, Presidente Médici, Espigão do Oeste, Rolim de Moura, Alta Floresta, Nova Brasilândia, São Miguel, and Ouro Preto.

In the educational field, UNoB has two boarding schools that offer elementary school: Agro-Industrial Adventist Academy, located in the city of Rio Preto da Eva, in the state of Amazonas; and the West Amazon Adventist Academy, in Mirante da Serra, in the state of Rondônia. In the Union field, there are also 23 other school units of the Adventist Educational Network operating, where 530 teachers work, serving 11,572 students.

Organizational History

The work done by volunteers and workers through the Light Bearer7 launches was decisive for the history of Adventism in Amazonas. The Adventist message, which had arrived before, was consolidated and expanded in the northern region of Brazil, from 1928, with the arrival of the American missionary couple Leo and Jessie Halliwell, in the city of Belém, state of Pará. The couple had the idea of building a small boat, that is, a launch, for providing medical and dental care to riverside communities, types of villages prevalent in the region that would be evangelized. As a result, in 1940, the Adventist church inaugurated an administrative headquarters in the city of Manaus: Central Amazon Conference. Later, in 1976, the present Manaus Adventist Hospital began to be built. At that time the entire northern region of Brazil was served by North Brazil Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists.

As the Adventist message advanced in the northern region, in 1979, the state of Rondônia, which borders Amazonas, also received an administrative headquarters in its capital, Porto Velho. The institution was initially called West Amazon Conference, and now it leads the Adventist work in the northern and central part of Rondônia, in addition to the state of Acre. In 2006, as a result of the continuous growth of Adventism in the state of Amazonas, it was necessary to create another administrative unit in the North Brazil Union Mission territory, which received the name Amazonas-Roraima Conference. Since then its headquarters has been in Manaus, and its missionary territory covers the state of Roraima and part of Amazonas.

Amid all this progress, North Brazil Union Mission, headquartered in the city of Belém, state of Pará, managed a missionary field of 3,920,506 km², which included the states of Pará, Amapá, Maranhão, Amazonas, Acre, Roraima, and Rondônia; which takes up 45.53 percent of the total area of Brazil.8 At the same time, the North Brazil Union Mission administered about one thousand five hundred churches, which had more than five hundred thousand members.9 In this vast Amazonian territory, with a challenging administrative structure, the growth and formation of the missionary fields were directly related to the route from Belém to Manaus, which was the main route of the Light Bearer launches. With the medical, assistancial and missionary work carried out along this route, the Adventist presence expanded significantly to more and more points along the riverbanks and from there to other places.10

Since it is a region of great distances, with many rivers, dense forests, and very few roads, the administration was unable to serve all fields as necessary. As a result, the North Brazil Union Mission planned to dismember part of its missionary area of activity. On July 6, 2004 an Executive Board of North Brazil Union Mission took place, with the aim of addressing this issue. On that occasion, the recommendation of the Survey Board was approved, which after some studies proposed the creation of a new Union-Mission, suggesting that its administrative headquarters should be established in the city of Manaus. The main justification presented was that the reconfiguration of the field, as envisaged, would reduce distances, bring local offices closer to churches, promote integration among members, and standardize the SDA projects in the region.11

However, due to the necessary arrangements, the reorganization of the field took place definitively after five years. From May 11-14, 2009, the leaders of the South American Division and administrators of the Unions and institutions met in the SAD Plenary Executive Board for the final deliberation of the matter. At this meeting they approved the formation of Northwest Brazil Union Mission (UNoB), a decision that was registered in vote no. 2009--2011. Once again the geographic extension, population density, mobility challenges, and the need for better service to churches and institutions were well specified as a justification for the creation of this administrative unit. In addition, the establishment of new congregations and the purpose of better reaching those who did not yet have access to Adventism were emphasized.12

At the time of its establishment, UNoB served 112 pastoral districts and a missionary field that covered the states of Amazonas, Roraima, Rondônia, and Acre, being responsible for 25.7 percent of Adventist churches in the Brazilian territory. The Administrative units in the field comprised the Amazonas-Roraima Conference, Central Amazon Conference, West Amazon Conference, and South Rondônia Conference. All of them were involved and committed to the proposed creation of the new union.13 At the same meeting of the SAD Plenary Executive Board, in 2009, the first UNoB administrators were voted.14

Formally established on May 27, 2009, the “SDA Northwest Brazil Union Mission,” incorporated part of the institutions, heritage, and ecclesial activities that until then were led by the North Brazil Union Mission. Manaus Adventist Hospital, two boarding schools, and some schools were included. Still in the same year, after the approval that took place in May, the SAD directed the Denominational General Assembly of Organization of UNoB, held from November 16 to 18. In this assembly, the Internal Regulations for the new union were established, department leaders were elected, and action plans were drawn up for the institution. On that occasion the first administrative officers were sworn in.15

UNoB started to operate on January 1, 2010. The total amount of members at that time was 115,058, distributed in 651 churches and 464 groups.16 Its office had 14 employees, and the churches were served by 174 pastors. In addition, 507 employees worked in the health area and 464 in the educational area, in 27 school units. The creation of this union brought considerable advances to Adventist work in the northwest region of Brazil, some of which were noticed in its first years of existence.17 It can be mentioned, as an example, the inauguration of the Light Bearer launch XXVI, on May 15, 2010, in the city of Manaus. This initiative marked the resumption of the most important medical missionary project of the Adventist organization in the Amazon region. To carry out this project, UNoB's regional ADRA18 made an investment of approximately US $130,000. Still regarding the medical missionary area, Manaus Adventist Hospital acquired new magnetic resonance equipment, “becoming the first unit of the Adventist Health Network to offer this service.”19

Some improvements also took place in the educational segment. UNoB has partnered with Brazil Adventist University, São Paulo campus (UNASP), aiming at training people. This agreement made it possible to offer graduate courses in psychopedagogy to teachers and to more than six hundred students at the Agro-Industrial Adventist Academy and West Amazon Adventist Academy.20 Still in 2010, before celebrating its first anniversary, UNoB inaugurated its new headquarters, a 4,000 square meter building, in Distrito Industrial neighborhood, next to Manaus Adventist Hospital. The inauguration ceremony took place on November 18.21

Since the beginning of its activities, the UNoB leadership established the challenge of doing everything they could so that the advent message reached all cities in the region. Since then this institution has constantly sought to achieve this goal. By the end of 2010, it was found that only four cities had no Adventist presence: Ipixuna and Pauini (in the state of Amazonas); and Pimenteiras do Oeste and Primavera (in the state of Rondônia).22 With this data at hand, they established actions that would be taken to reach these cities as soon as possible. For this and other challenges, TV Novo Tempo (Hope Channel Brazil) became an important ally in reaching people in the Amazon territory. Campaigns started to be carried out. Within April 27 and May 6, 2012, a committee formed by regional administrators of the Adventist organization and by the “Voz da Profecia” (Voice of Prophecy) team, visited some municipalities around the city of Manaus and inaugurated TV Novo Tempo open channel in four of them: Itacoatiara, Manicoré, Maués, and Parintins.23

In 2013, with the aim of reaching an even larger audience, TV Novo Tempo open signal started to cover the city of Manaus and surroundings, with a potential reach of more than two million people. To celebrate this achievement, more than thirty thousand people were present in Praia da Ponta Negra amphitheater. As a result of the church's investment in this region, the hope channel began to be openly broadcast in 75 percent of the entire UNoB territory.24

Other missionary fronts stood out at UNoB. In 2015, on September 5 to 7, the first Pathfinders Camporee25 took place26. The event was attended by 14,000 young people who were housed in 3,500 tents and 600 people who were part of the support teams. The event was held at the Agro-Industrial Adventist Academy facilities, close to the city of Rio Preto da Eva, in Amazonas. The theme of the camporee was “À Prova de Fogo” (Fireproof), and during the program there were several devotional activities, investitures, and baptisms.27 This event was a milestone in the history of UNoB, and it took two years of planning for it to become a reality. Pathfinders from different parts of the Amazon region arrived on the site by boat, the most common means of transportation for the inhabitants of the region.28

And that kind of work continued to grow. Currently there are almost twenty-six thousand pathfinders registered among 910 clubs, and the Adventurers29 department registers 10,189 participants in 559 clubs.30 With these active departments, important work is carried out with children and adolescents in the area where the union operates. In addition to these initiatives, the field has also promoted actions aimed at its young audience. One of the events directed toward them was the first UNoB Youth Camporee, which was also held at the Agro-Industrial Adventist Academy facilities, from May 29 to June 3, 2018. This first edition was attended by 352 young societies of the field, totaling about twelve thousand people present.31 There, participation in cross-cultural missions was encouraged and, as a result, 1,200 young people signed up for missionary projects.32

Other missionary fronts have also received attention from UNoB since that same time, as in the case of the IQN project. On October 20 and 21, 2016, at Praia da Ponta Negra, there was the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the Adventist presence in Manaus, an event that had a great concentration of Adventist people. On the occasion, the “Igreja que Navega” (The Church That Navigates--IQN) was inaugurated.33 This project is about a boat/church specially conceived to provide evangelistic and humanitarian support, developing its mission in partnership with the Light Bearer launches from ADRA Brazil, through medical and dental care in the communities. The resources obtained through missionary donations from Sabbath School from all over the world added to the resources of the Central Amazon Conference and the Amazonas-Roraima Conference, together with UNoB, were destined to build this church-boat that would visit the riverside communities giving them the opportunity to access a place where they could know and worship God.

The purpose of this initiative is to take the love of Christ to places that would be difficult to reach by other means. The IQN has two floors. The church is in the lower floor, with a space to accommodate 120 people, which is destined for evangelistic meetings in the communities. This is a comfortable and cozy environment for people to learn about God. In addition to the meeting room, the boat also has a complete structure for housing a missionary family and its captain. Pastor Reno Guerra and his wife, Natália, were the first to accept the call to be bearers of hope through this floating missionary vehicle on the Amazon rivers.34 In two years of activities (2017/2018), the IQN established eight churches, impacted 18 riverside and indigenous communities, offered more than two thousand healthcare services, and baptized more than five hundred people.35 These are significant numbers that testify to the valuable contribution of this project to the spread of the gospel in the region.

The IQN project, as well as other missionary fronts, receives strong support from ADRA, an institution that performs a social assistance function considered essential for the Amazonian community, maintaining great representativeness in this territory. The activities of ADRA Regional Amazonas agencies (Amazonas-Roraima Conference and Central Amazon Conference) and ADRA Regional Rondônia (West Amazon Conference and South Rondônia Conference) made the political leaders of the Amazon region realize the importance of the work developed in the region. On September 21, 2017, civil authorities in Manaus paid tribute to the Adventists for the social projects that are offered in the communities. On that occasion Manaus Municipal Chamber offered the Gold Medal “City of Manaus”.36 Another tribute was paid on September 2, 2019. The Adventist denomination was honored, not only for social work but also for the great mobilizations that are carried out in Manaus through projects such as “Vida por Vidas” (Life for Lives),37 “Quebrando o Silêncio” (Breaking the Silence),38 and “Missão Calebe” (Caleb Mission)39 among others.40

The vibrant way in which UNoB leadership and membership has been involved in these and other missionary and global mission projects has been a characterizing factor of the Adventism profile in this region of Brazil, as well.41 As a result, in the city of Manaus, the church achieved something unprecedented in the history of the Adventist organization by becoming the first city in the world to have an Adventist congregation in each neighborhood. This became a reality in October 2013, when the first meeting of the Adventist Church took place in the Adrianópolis neighborhood. Through the presence and actions of the Adventist denomination, “thousands of people were given the opportunity to know and live the great hope; hundreds of families were restored; thousands of young people-- adolescents and children-- are encouraged to develop their physical, mental, and spiritual aspects harmoniously, in order to be good citizens and Christians.”42

This progress of the Adventist work in Manaus encouraged other capitals in northwestern Brazil to seek the same achievement,43 as it was the case with the city of Porto Velho, capital of the state of Rondônia. Through the recognized efforts of Adventists in that region, by the end of 2014 many neighborhoods had already been conquered and there were only 16 places left without Adventist temples. Three years later, in 2017, Porto Velho managed to fulfill this goal, and now it has one Adventist congregation in each of its neighborhoods. To celebrate this important achievement, an event was held on May 27, 2017, which was attended by 8,000 people, among them the Adventist leaders from the South American Division and the Northwest Union Mission.44 The next city to achieve this mark will be the capital of Roraima, Boa Vista, 45 where there are 7,848 members spread across 87 congregations. There are also four neighborhoods that are served by two churches, showing that very soon they will all have an Adventist congregation.46

Another evangelistic milestone is the fact that Northwest Brazil Union Mission was the first to establish an Adventist presence in all the cities in its area of operation.47 This goal has been established since its emergence. The last city in the territory to receive a temple was Primavera, in the state of Rondônia. After carrying out several missionary actions, on September 18, 2011, the inauguration ceremony of the new congregation was held there.48 In this place the first convert was a man who dreamed of becoming a priest and dedicated himself to Bible studies in a monastery. When faced with the teachings of the Word of God, he became a Seventh-day Adventist.49

The missionary conquests brought significant results in the UNoB field. With approximately a decade of existence, nowadays it has 173,630 members, organized in 974 churches and 820 groups. These figures show that the creation of the North Brazil Union Mission territory was a right decision, and it is believed that it will grow persistently and consistently over time.50 As an institution that represents and contributes to the mission of the church in preaching the gospel, in preparation for the return of Christ, UNoB does not and will not measure efforts to participate in this task. By the grace of God, the Adventist presence has strengthened and expanded in the UNoB region, and it will continue to progress successfully.51

However, there are challenges to be overcome in the UNoB field. The first one deals with the effects of the political, social, and economic crisis that Brazil has been going through for some years, which has brought financial difficulties for the members and, as a result, for the church. The other challenging factor is to be able to meet, as much as possible and in an appropriate manner, the large amount of immigrants who have sought refuge in Brazil due to the crises faced in their home country. This is the case, for example, of the Haitian and Venezuelan population that has sought support in the states of the Amazon region. The challenge comprises three areas: social, organizational, and, above all, missionary. ADRA and the local church are increasingly challenged to seek means and resources to meet the primary needs of the people who seek them there. In this context there is also a need to inaugurate and expand temples and congregations to serve the new brethren in the faith who come from these immigrant groups.52

The third challenging factor in the UNoB field is geographical in nature. It concerns long distances and difficulties with means of transport to access the different locations in the Amazon jungle. There are many riverside and indigenous communities who live within a radius of 1,100 km from Manaus. The most distant place the church can reach in order to provide medical and missionary care is where the Sateré Mawé indigenous ethnic group is located, about 700 km away from the capital of Amazonas. It is not possible to have access to these places through highways, which means that the displacement is done through waterways. The trip lasts approximately thirty-four hours by boat if the river conditions are normal and, in periods of drought, the journey can last 48 hours. Because of, another challenge arising from the multicultural composition of the Amazon is the wide variety of languages spoken by indigenous peoples. Many villages do not have Portuguese as an official language, which requires strategies and alternatives for communication with these peoples.53

The challenges mentioned, as well as many others, are real. However, those who live and work in this region have already seen that nothing has been an obstacle for God to make His work progress. Confident in this truth, even amid the most varied types of challenges, the UNoB leadership has strategically planned the continuous growth of the church in this region. There are plans to inaugurate three more administrative headquarters: one in the city of Boa Vista, state of Roraima; another in Rio Branco, in the state of Acre; and a third one in Manaus, capital of Amazonas. To this end the institution wants to continue and expand the “Amazônia de Esperança” (Amazon of Hope) project54, in addition to strengthening the solidarity and social actions led by ADRA, which are already solidly established in the states of Amazonas, Roraima, and Rondônia. The leadership will also pay attention to the area of evangelism through radio and television. Through these and other missionary fronts, the goal will continue being the reach of more and more people in the Amazon territory for the kingdom of God.55

Chronology of Administrative Leaders

Presidents: Gilmar Zahn (2010-2019); Sergio Alan Caxeta (2019-Present).56

Secretaries: Alijofran Lima Brandão (2010-2012); Jim Galvão (2012-2015); Jessé Oliveira (2015); Waldony Fiuza (2015-2019); José Hadson Gomes de Araújo (2019-Present).57

Treasurers: Celso Aparecido dos Santos (2010-Present).58

Sources

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Baracho, Priscila. “Igreja Adventista recebe homenagem por trabalhos sociais desenvolvidos no AM” [Adventist Church receives tribute for social work developed in the AM]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), September 21, 2017.

Barbosa, Wellington. “Frutos da Amazônia” [Amazon Results]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1316, year 111 (December 2016).

Bezerra, Dayse. “A esperança está no ar” [Hope is in the air]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1248, year 107 (June 2012).

Câmara Municipal de Manaus [Manaus Municipal Chamber]. http://www.cmm.am.gov.br/.

Cavalcanti, Diogo. “Retratos da Amazônia” [Portraits of the Amazon]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] (Online), December 18, 2014.

Cavalcanti, Francisco Abdoval. A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital in Brazil]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016.

“Convocação da Assembleia Geral Denominacional de Organização (AGDO) da União Noroeste Brasileira da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia” [Convocation of the Denominational General Assembly of Organization (AGDO) of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 2009.

Da Redação [By the Editors]. “DSA elege novos líderes e planeja evangelismo de 2010” [SAD elects new leaders and plans 2010 evangelism]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1213, year 104 (June 2009).

Da Redação [By the Editors]. “Fitas cortadas” [Ribbons are cut]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1233, year 106 (January 2011).

Diniz, Luciana Santana. “Presidente Wiglife Saraiva é homenageado em Câmara Municipal de Manaus” [President Wiglife Saraiva is honored in Manaus Municipal Chamber]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), September 2, 2019.

Fato Amazônico [Amazonian Fact]. https://www.fatoamazonico.com/.

Guerra, Reno (Pastor of the Church that Navigates). WhatsApp message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), April 9, 2019.

Gusmão, Raphael A. R. “Inauguração do templo da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia em Primavera de Rondônia” [Inauguration of the Seventh-day Adventist Church temple in Primavera de Rondônia]. Universo Desbravador [Pathfinder Universe], October 27, 2011.

Hack, Ana. “Capital celebra uma igreja em cada bairro” [Capital celebrates one church in each neighborhood]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), June 2, 2017.

Jr., Arnaldo Balog. “Frutos da Selva” [The Jungle Results]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1228, year 106 (September 2010).

Kohler, Erton. “Como chegamos até aqui” [How we got here]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1266, year 108 (November 2013).

Lessa, Rubens. Construtores de Esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016.

Lopes, Tatiane. “Com foco na missão, inovador Campori de Jovens acontece no Amazonas” [Focusing on the mission, innovative Youth Camporee takes place in Amazonas]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), June 7, 2018.

Lopes, Tatiane. “Nosso campo é o mundo” [Our field is the world]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1335, year 113 (July 2018).

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Missão 360 [Mission 360]. “A Igreja que Navega (Brasil)” [The Church that Navigates (Brazil)] (video). Reportage made by the 360º program, January 6, 2018. Accessed on April 4, 2019, https://bit.ly/2trdeyp.

“Plantio de igrejas” [Church planting]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 2012.

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Santos, Ronivon da Silva dos (UNoB Ministerial). Email message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira, October 11, 2019.

Saraiva, Wiglife Areosa (Amazonas-Roraima Conference president). Interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), September 26, 2016.

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Sigolin, Priscila Baracho. “Com inauguração, Manaus passa a ter templos adventistas em todos os bairros” [With inauguration, Manaus now has Adventist temples in all neighborhoods]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), July 23, 2019.

Sigolin, Priscila Baracho. “Nomeado novo presidente para a região central do Amazonas” [New president appointed for the central region of Amazonas]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), October 23, 2019.

Silva, Guilherme. “Esperança na telinha” [Hope on the screen]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1264, year 108 (September 2013).

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Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “Northwest Brazil Union Mission,” accessed on February 26, 2018, https://bit.ly/2Q7Icoh.

  2. Sistema Adventista de Gestão de Igrejas [Adventist Management System of Churches] (ACMS), accessed on July 17, 2019, www.acmsnet.org.

  3. Ibid.

  4. Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 11, 2019.

  5. Wellington Barbosa, “Frutos da Amazônia” [Amazon Results], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1316, year 111 (December 2016): 30.

  6. Wiglife Areosa Saraiva (Amazonas-Roraima Conference president), interviewed by Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), September 26, 2016.

  7. “The first Light Bearer Missionary Launch was inaugurated in July 1931 by the couple Leo and Jessie Halliwell, aiming to bring health education and free medical and dental assistance to the riverside population in the Amazon. [...] During these 80 years, thousands of people were directly benefited by the support provided by the launches. In many cases, this was the only way of these people to get some medical and dental assistance.” Luzeiro [Light Bearer], “História” [History], accessed on January 22, 2020, https://www.luzeiro.org/.

  8. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 157.

  9. “North Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2007), 266-270.

  10. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 157.

  11. Francisco Abdoval Cavalcanti, A conquista de uma cidade: conheça a história da capital mais evangelizada do Brasil [The conquest of a city: know the history of the most evangelized capital in Brazil], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 225-226.

  12. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 158.

  13. Da Redação [By the Editors], “DSA elege novos líderes e planeja evangelismo de 2010” [SAD elects new leaders and plans 2010 evangelism], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1213, year 104 (June 2009): 33.

  14. Ibid.

  15. “Convocação da Assembleia Geral Denominacional de Organização (AGDO) da União Noroeste Brasileira da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia” [Convocation of the Denominational General Assembly of Organization (AGDO) of the Northwest Brazil Union Mission of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 2009, 36.

  16. “Northwest Brazil Union Mission,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Hagerstown, MD.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 2010), 286.

  17. Arnaldo Balog Jr., “Frutos da Selva” [The Jungle Results], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1228, year 106 (September 2010): 35.

  18. “ADRA is the Humanitarian Agency of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. We are present in more than 130 countries and, in Brazil, we are organized into 13 regional offices that cover 15 states. In addition to attending emergencies, we also have ongoing human development projects [...].” ADRA, “Justiça, Compaixão e Amor” [Justice, Compassion and Love], accessed on April 5, 2020, https://adra.org.br/sobre/.

  19. Arnaldo Balog Jr., “Frutos da Selva” [The Jungle Results], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1228, year 106 (September 2010): 34-35.

  20. Ibid., 35.

  21. Da Redação [By the Editors], “Fitas cortadas” [Ribbons are cut], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1233, year 106 (January 2011): 26.

  22. Arnaldo Balog Jr., “Frutos da Selva” [The Jungle Results], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1228, year 106 (September 2010): 34.

  23. Dayse Bezerra, “A esperança está no ar” [Hope is in the air], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1248, year 107 (June 2012): 25-26.

  24. Guilherme Silva, “Esperança na telinha” [Hope on the screen], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1264, year 108 (September 2013): 31.

  25. “Camporee is a large camp that gathers teenagers, youth and children who participate in the clubs maintained by the Seventh-day Adventist Church.” Seventh Day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Campori de Desbravadores da DSA” [Pathfinders Camporee of South America Division (SAD)], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2uwY377.

  26. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “are thrilled with outdoor activities. They like camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. They know how to cook outdoors, making a fire without matches.” Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by manual arts. They also fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Quem somos” [About Us], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  27. “14 mil acampantes” [14 thousand campers], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 2015, 8; Priscila Baracho, “Igreja Adventista recebe homenagem por trabalhos sociais desenvolvidos no AM” [Adventist Church receives tribute for social work developed in the AM], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 21, 2017, accessed on August 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/30jPvvj.

  28. Ibid.

  29. The Adventurers Club is a specific program for children from 6 to 9 years old, created by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, in 1972. At the meetings, children carry out activities with a focus on physical, mental and spiritual development. Seventh Day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Aventureiros” [Adventurers], accessed on June 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YtukZz.

  30. Ministério de Desbravadores e Aventureiros UNOB [UNOB Pathfinders and Adventurers Ministries], “Estatísticas - União Noroeste Brasileira” [Statistics - Northwest Brazil Union Mission], accessed on March 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/35sn1lP.

  31. Tatiane Lopes, “Com foco na missão, inovador Campori de Jovens acontece no Amazonas” [Focusing on the mission, innovative Youth Camporee takes place in Amazonas], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 7, 2018, accessed on August 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/2HuVciX.

  32. Tatiane Lopes, “Nosso campo é o mundo” [Our field is the world], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1335, year 113 (July 2018): 41.

  33. Missão 360 [Mission 360], “A Igreja que Navega (Brasil)” [The Church that Navigates (Brazil)], video of the reportage made by the 360º program, January 6, 2018, accessed on April 4, 2019; https://bit.ly/2trdey.

  34. Ibid.

  35. Reno Guerra (Pastor of the Church that Navigates), WhatsApp message to Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), April 9, 2019.

  36. Priscila Baracho, “Igreja Adventista recebe homenagem por trabalhos sociais desenvolvidos no AM” [Adventist Church receives tribute for social work developed in the AM], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 21, 2017, accessed on August 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/30jPvvj; Câmara Municipal de Manaus [Manaus Municipal Chamber], “Presidente da Igreja Adventista recebe homenagem na Câmara” [Adventist Church President receives tribute in the Chamber], accessed on August 29, 2019, https://bit.ly/30H0tLP.

  37. “Voluntary initiative promoted by Adventist Youth. In 2005 the Project came up with the proposal to contribute to blood centers by encouraging blood donation during the Easter period.” Vida por Vidas [Life for Lives], “O Projeto” [The Project], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://www.vidaporvidas.com/pt/o-projeto/.

  38. “Breaking the Silence is an annual project, developed since 2002, by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in eight countries of South America (Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay) that aims to educate and prevent against the domestic abuse and violence.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Quebrando o Silêncio” [Breaking the Silence], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WoDfIW.

  39. “Caleb Mission project is a volunteer program, social service, and a witnessing that challenges the Adventist youth to dedicate their vacations to evangelism in places where there’s no Adventist presence, to strengthen the small congregations and gain new people for the kingdom of God.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Missão Calebe 2020” [Caleb Mission 2020], accessed on February 4, 2020, http://bit.ly/2HRpvRi.

  40. Luciana Santana Diniz, “Presidente Wiglife Saraiva é homenageado em Câmara Municipal de Manaus” [President Wiglife Saraiva is honored in Manaus Municipal Chamber], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], September 2, 2019, accessed on September 9, 2019; https://bit.ly/2lKpZzW.

  41. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 161.

  42. Fato Amazônico [Amazonian Fact], “Câmara Municipal concede Medalha de Ouro ao pastor adventista Wiglife Areosa” [Municipal Chamber awards Gold Medal to Adventist pastor Wiglife Areosa], accessed on August 29, 2019, https://bit.ly/2NE2Bjv.

  43. Priscila Baracho Sigolin, “Com inauguração, Manaus passa a ter templos adventistas em todos os bairros” [With inauguration, Manaus now has Adventist temples in all neighborhoods], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], July 23, 2019, accessed on August 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/2K9OfnZ.

  44. Ana Hack, “Capital celebra uma igreja em cada bairro” [Capital celebrates one church in each neighborhood], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], June 2, 2017, accessed on August 20, 2019, https://bit.ly/31AGsXe.

  45. Diogo Cavalcanti, “Retratos da Amazônia” [Portraits of the Amazon], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 18, 2014, accessed on August 29, 2019, https://bit.ly/2ZsYcqd.

  46. Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 11, 2019.

  47. Erton Kohler, “Como chegamos até aqui” [How we got here], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1266, year 108 (November 2013): 4.

  48. Raphael A.R. Gusmão, “Inauguração do templo da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia em Primavera de Rondônia” [Inauguration of the Seventh-day Adventist Church temple in Primavera de Rondônia], Universo Desbravador [Pathfinder Universe], October 27, 2011, accessed on August 29, 2019; https://bit.ly/2ZA0784.

  49. “Plantio de igrejas” [Church planting], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 2012, 26.

  50. Rubens Lessa, Construtores de esperança: na trilha dos pioneiros adventistas da Amazônia [Builders of Hope: on the trail of Adventist pioneers in the Amazon], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2016, 163.

  51. Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Missão e Serviço” [Mission and Service], accessed on March 10, 2020, https://bit.ly/2VZCCqX.

  52. Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 11, 2019.

  53. Ibid.

  54. “Through donations and offerings, the Amazônia de Esperança [Amazon of Hope] project has the goal of bringing the Gospel to unreached and hard to access places of this region, with churches adapted for a living experience of worship!”. Amazônia de esperança [Amazon of Hope], “Resumo do projeto” [Project Summary], accessed on March 9, 2020, https://bit.ly/38ChGJp.

  55. Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (UNoB Ministerial), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), October 11, 2019.

  56. Priscila Baracho Sigolin, “Nomeado novo presidente para a região central do Amazonas” [New president appointed for the central region of Amazonas], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], October 23, 2019, accessed on November 11, 2019; https://bit.ly/33Dwupv.

  57. Anne Seixas and Jefferson Paradello, “Igreja vota novos gestores de instituições e sedes administrativas” [Church votes new managers of institutions and administrative headquarters], Noticias Adventistas [Adventist news], November 10, 2019, accessed on November 11, 2019; https://bit.ly/2Q9IH16. For a more detailed check on the administrative directors of Northwest Brazil Union Mission, see the Yearbooks from 2010 to 2018.

  58. For more information about UnoB, access the Website http://unob.adventistas.org/, or the social media Facebook: fb.com/adventistasnoroeste; Twitter: @advnoroeste, and Instagram: @adventistasnoroeste.

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Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos. "Northwest Brazil Union Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIFZ.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos. "Northwest Brazil Union Mission." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIFZ.

Vieira, Adilson da Silva, Ronivon da Silva dos Santos (2021, January 10). Northwest Brazil Union Mission. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved March 04, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CIFZ.