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Aerial view of Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo) (UNASP-EC) campus

Photo courtesy of UNASP-EC Archives, accessed on June 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/3duSPcR.

Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus

By Renato Ferreira Silva

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Renato Ferreira Silva

First Published: June 10, 2021

Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho campus (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo or UNASP-EC) is an institution that offers early childhood education, elementary, high school, and higher education in a day and boarding school system. It belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and is part of the Adventist world educational network. It is in the territory of Central Brazil Union Conference (União Central Brasileira or UCB). Its address is: Pastor Walter Boger Municipal Road, km 3.5, Zip Code 13448-970, Lagoa Bonita neighborhood, in the municipality of Engenheiro Coelho, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

UNASP-EC offers higher education courses in Administration, Architecture and Urbanism, Accounting, Law, Agronomic Engineering, Civil Engineering, Production Engineering, Pharmacy, History, Journalism, Languages - Portuguese, Languages - English, Veterinary Medicine, Music, Pedagogy, Psychology, Publicity and Advertising, Radio and TV, Internet Systems, Theology, and Translation. At post-graduate level, the campus offers Master’s degrees in Education and in Theology, Doctorate in Theology, and Master in Business Administration degree in Leadership, the latter in partnership with Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, the United States.1

Currently, UNASP-EC has 63,582.09 m² of built area, comprising 41 buildings and 13 houses. Among these, the largest buildings are the Female Dormitory (10,579.12 m²), Higher Education Building (9,734.24 m²), and Male Dormitory (8,330.61 m²). In addition to these are Brazil Adventist University Academy (4,950.60 m²), the cafeteria (4,183.40 m²), the campus church (3,734.55 m²), and the Communication Center (3,631.14 m²). The campus also houses the Rectory building of UNASP Tricampi (2,946.52 m²), the Center for Spiritual and Cultural Development (which includes the Children's Sabbath School building; 2,239.90 m²), and the UNASP Village Inn hotel (2,239.90 m²). The campus also has a sports complex formed by indoor and outdoor courts, an athletics track, and an Olympic pool.2

Currently, there are about 3,988 students enrolled at all levels of education offered on the campus. The entire student body is served by 800 workers, among whom are 245 teachers. Among the workers, 38 are credentialed missionaries and 34 are licensed missionaries, 16 are credentialed ministers and 12 are licensed ministers.3

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the School

The origin of UNASP-EC dates back to mid-1979, when the city of São Paulo issued Decree No. 15,887, making the expropriation of a large part of the area owned by Brazil College (presently known as Brazil Adventist University, São Paulo campus) official. The reason given by the city of São Paulo was that the space was going to be transformed into a major housing project to meet the housing demands of the region. The Adventist church managed to reach an agreement with the São Paulo city officials, and the central area of the Brazil College campus, where the educational buildings were located, was not included in the expropriation. After the expropriation by the city, Brazil College remained the owner of 30 hectares of the original 170 hectares of the area.4

On July 21, 1983, in another decree (nº 18,891), the São Paulo City Hall ratified the expropriation of the Brazil College land, and an agreement regarding the monetary compensation was signed between the city and the South Brazil Union Conference (União Sul Brasileira or USB, presently Central Brazil Union Conference).5 It was agreed that the school would receive $4.3 million for the expropriated area.6 The leaders of the South American Division, the South Brazil Union Conference, and Brazil College decided to look for another location to establish a new campus. For this purpose, they sought an area further away from urban centers, as there was a consensus that

in this way, we return to the origins. Our boarding schools must be close to nature, away from the pollution and confusion of a big city. The place must be peaceful, where the works of the Author of Nature can be contemplated and loved.7

In the following two months, the Adventist church leaders visited many farms in the countryside of São Paulo.8 On September 13, 1983, a board formed by the president of the South Brazil Union Conference, representatives of the South American Division, East Sao Paulo Conference, and South Sao Paulo Conference (presently Sao Paulo Conference) visited Lagoa Bonita Farm, in a region that at the time belonged to the municipality of Artur Nogueira.9 During this visit, there was a consensus among administrators that the discovery of this site had been a divine providence in favor of Adventist educational work in the country.10 The place had an area of 6,352,500.00 m² and was 58 km away from the city of Campinas.11 There were 160 thousand citrus trees there, which produced 300 thousand fruit boxes a year,12 in addition to 8 tractors, 3 vehicles, and other agricultural implements. There was also the main house, which was the administrator's residence, a Catholic church chapel13, and six houses for employees.

The School’s Establishment

Through a vote taken during the visit (USB 83-202),14 the purchase of the farm was approved immediately.15 The land was acquired on September 15, worth approximately US$ 2.5 million.16 Although the deed was only completed on October 4, on September 30, there was the first Adventist meeting on the Farm, in a sunset praise service.17 The first Sabbath School was held on October 1, and the first full worship service and Sabbath School took place on October 8, in the chapel located on the farm.18 On October 9, 1983 the South Brazil Union Conference and the Brazil College became official owners of Lagoa Bonita Farm. The first worker to begin work on the site was Ricardo Leme, who arrived on October 20. The same year, the construction of houses for workers and employees began. Pastor Walter Boger was appointed as the first director of the campus.19

At the end of 1983, a strong frost affected the orange groves of the state of Florida, in the extreme south of the United States. The reduction in production in that region caused a sudden increase in the price of oranges worldwide. Hence, oranges from Brazil were in high demand in order to meet the needs of the global market. At the time, juice manufacturers offered generous advances to producers in order to guarantee the delivery of their future harvests. One of these proposals was presented to the College by an industry with a branch in the city of Limeira, in the countryside of São Paulo. Thus, the school's oranges harvest, in the period 1984/1985, was sold with advance payment, and 300 thousand boxes were harvested in that period. With the amount earned through this commercial transaction, it was possible to recover the entire amount previously spent on the purchase of the property. The remaining funds were lent to Brazil Publishing House, helping to complete the construction of the facilities of its new headquarters in the city of Tatuí, state of São Paulo.20

In March 1984, the institution started to offer elementary school education (1st to 4th grade), with 15 students, in the main house of the farm, with Raquel Modro as the first teacher.21 The rooms were transformed into classrooms and the school office. The service area became the canteen, and the balcony, patio, and living room were transformed into a reception and director’s office. On June 17, 1984, the cornerstone of the New Brazil College (Novo IAE), as the College was called, was laid in the presence of the then vice-governor of São Paulo,22 as well as ecclesiastical authorities of the Adventist church in Brazil and worldwide. The following year, in January 1985, the Brazil College management completed the New Brazil College Master Plan, which contained all the geographic characteristics of the farm, as well as the construction project of the buildings. On May 11, 1985, the campus church was organized, with 71 members at that time. On August 19, the construction work on the cafeteria with a capacity for 1,500 people began.23

In 1986, grade 5 of the elementary school education was opened. There were now 44 students enrolled in grades 1-5, in addition to students enrolled in the Supplementary program at elementary school and high school education levels.24 The elementary school had 6 teachers. In early 1986 the construction of the elementary school building began.25 That same year, members of the campus congregation held an evangelistic series in the district of Engenheiro Coelho, which resulted in the formation of an Adventist group in that place. In August 1986, the board of the New Brazil College published the 1986-1990 Five-Year Plan, in addition to the Master Plan. This document guided the start and progress of construction works on the new campus. The month was also marked by the purchase of an additional 890 thousand m² of land close to the farm, to be used as pasture. With more land acquired, by the end of 1986, another 120 cattle were transferred from the old to the new campus, reaching the number of 400 cattle by 1993. At that time (1986), students worked from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and classes took place at night, from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.26

The year 1987 was marked by advances in the academic field. The elementary school began its work in the new building where it currently operates, and Artur Dassow Library, belonging to the elementary school, was expanded. In 1987, the elementary school had 147 students. In the same year, the first graduation ceremony with the motto “Crescer, servindo” [Grow, serving] took place on the campus and celebrated 36 elementary school students who finished their elementary education. The same year, the Regional Education Department, based in the city of Limeira, authorized the operation of the Accounting high school program. Furthermore, still in the same year, the General Conference representatives performed their first evaluation of the campus to help establish the theology program.27 In the area of infrastructure, the male dormitory and the stable of the College started to be built. In addition, part of the farm was subdivided for the construction of what turned out to be Residencial Lagoa Bonita [Lagoa Bonita Condominium].28

In 1987, at the end of the college's first four years of activities, the New Brazil College had a net worth estimated at US$ 12 million. The college area included 130 thousand orange trees, two lakes, an area for planting cereals, and a space to shelter the cows. All of these resources resulted in the annual production of 250 thousand boxes of orange and 900 tons of cereals. In the dairy farm, daily milking yielded 1,700 liters of milk. In 1987, the construction of the Artesian Well began. The well was approximately 300 meters deep, resulting in an initial flow of 47 thousand liters of water per hour. At the time, estimates indicated that there would be no water concerns for the next 13 years.29

The School’s History

In 1988, the College already served 365 students enrolled in the elementary school and another 68 in the first year of the Accounting high school program. The construction work on four new buildings started on the campus: the laundry room, a shed for processing oranges, the maintenance building, and the female dormitory. At the beginning of the following year (1989), the campus church, then with 300 members, became the headquarters of the pastoral district that also included the existing congregations in Artur Nogueira and Engenheiro Coelho, with Jorge Mário de Oliveira as its first district pastor.30 The year was also marked by the decision to stop offering the Supplementary course.31 It is believed that the course was extinguished because the new college began to focus on establishing higher education.32 Still in 1989, the Communication Center started to be built, and the water, electricity, telephone and sewage services were improved.33

The 1990s inaugurated a new phase for the College. At that time, 794 students were enrolled. At the end of 1990, 128 students completed their study cycles: 42 from Elementary School, 48 from the Supplementary course, and 38 from the first Accounting class. On February 13, 1991, the classes of the first and second year of the Theological Seminary (Faculdade Adventista de Teologia or FAT) began, which was transferred from IAE-SP to the New Brazil College. Along with FAT, the Master’s degree in Theology was also transferred to the new campus, which became known as Instituto Adventista de Ensino - Campus Central [Brazil College - Central Campus] (IAE-Ct) and Instituto Adventista de Ensino - Campus 2 [Brazil College - Campus 2] (IAE-C2). The classes for these two programs took place on the ground floor of the Communication Center.34

In 1991, the construction works on the Higher Education building began thanks to a donation of US$ 350,00035 from the Chan Shun International Foundation.36 The University Library Dr. Enoch de Oliveira also started operating. In parallel with academic work, evangelism also bore fruits. That year, 26 baptisms resulted from the evangelistic work carried out by the College community. At that time, an important change that affected the College was the dismemberment of the Engenheiro Coelho district from the jurisdiction of the municipality of Artur Nogueira. The Engenheiro Coelho district was elevated to the level of a municipality on December 30, 1991.37 Hence, the Brazil College - Central Campus (IAE-Ct) belonged to the municipality of Engenheiro Coelho.38

In 1992, with 858 students on the campus, high school education was implemented, and the Education Adventist College (Faculdade Adventista de Educação or FAEd) with the Pedagogy program was transferred from Brazil College to IAE-Ct. Initially, only the first year of the program was transferred, and the others were gradually transferred until 1995.39 Also in 1992, the Evangelism program in the Theology curriculum was introduced, and the Communication Center was inaugurated. The money for the construction of the Communication Center building was a donation from Milton Soldani Afonso, an entrepreneur and supporter of Adventist education. The building received his name in his honor. In the same year, the Ellen G. White Research Center and the National Center of Adventist History were transferred to IAE-Ct, and the School of Arts was created, under the direction of Sílvia Araújo.40

In 1993, when IAE-Ct celebrated its 10th anniversary, the college already had a total of 1,709 students enrolled in the elementary school and the higher education programs. That year, the Data Processing program was introduced, replacing the Accounting high school program. In the postgraduate area, the doctoral program in Pastoral Theology and the postgraduate program in Education were started. The first publication of the journals O Flamboyant [The Flamboyant] and Horizontes Notícias [Horizons News], the first elementary school Cultural Fair, and the first Art Week of the School of Arts took place in 1993.41

On September 19, 1993, the IAE-Ct held a great celebration for its 10th anniversary. Two moments were considered the highlights of the celebration. The first was the program rendered by the quartets The King’s Heralds and Arautos do Rei, sponsored by “A Voz da Profecia” [The Voice of Prophecy], from the United States and Brazil, respectively. The second moment was the laying of the cornerstone of the church building.42

In 1994, 1,667 students were enrolled, of whom 567 were boarding students. That year, the computer lab for the Data Processing program was opened and professional programs in Music, Singing and Instruments were implemented. Furthermore, the Languages course was transferred from the São Paulo campus to the Engenheiro Coelho campus.43 The College's agricultural sector also gained prominence that year. The campus won the Banespa Award, with 1st place in Agricultural Productivity and 2nd place in the category of Large Milk Producers. In the evangelistic sphere, fulfilling its role as a faith-based institution, 26 students were baptized at the end of the year.44

The school continued to develop in the academic area and, in 1995, a postgraduate course in Teaching Methodology in the school of Education started. In the same year, the first edition of the Adventist Musicians Meeting appeared, an important event at the institution. In addition, the campus orchestra was formed, led by professor and conductor Vandir Schäffer. Meanwhile, construction on two new blocks of the female dormitory began. The year ended with the graduation of the first class of Pedagogy, and the baptism of 873 people in the municipalities of Engenheiro Coelho and Santo Antônio de Posse, fruits of the work of evangelism carried out by the students of Theology.45

From 1996 onwards, the Nursing Assistant course and two postgraduate programs in Education ( Educational Guidance and School Supervision) were implemented. In the following year (1997), FAEd started publishing the Revista Escola Adventista [Adventist School Review], and the Elementary School held the first Elementary School Friendship Games. In 1997, construction work for the expansion of the female dormitory was completed, the Informatics Laboratory was established, and on April 27, the multi-sports court was inaugurated. At the end of the year, the total number of enrollments for 1998 was 2,185 students.46

In addition to the number of enrollments, the college continued to have achievements in the academic area in 1998. In that year, MEC (Ministry of Education and Culture) authorized the operation of the Civil Engineering, Business Administration, Art Education (Music), and Translation and Interpretation courses. Pastor Walter Boger Municipal Road, which gives access to the school, and the campus pool were inaugurated on September 28 and November 29, respectively. In 1998, construction work on the Higher Education Auditorium started. In addition to the structural achievements, the campus was also the stage for important meetings, such as the first Symposium on Adventist History and the first University Meeting of IAE Campus 2.47

In 1998, Brazil College celebrated its 15th anniversary. The celebration took place on July 7, with a musical concert that involved several groups and choirs from the institution, and the singer Steve Green, a renowned performer of Christian music worldwide at that time. The event brought together about 10 thousand people to the campus lawn and was broadcast live by the Sistema Adventista de Comunicação [Adventist Communication System] (SISAC, presently called Rede Novo Tempo de Comunicação [Adventist Media Center - Brazil]), reaching audiences in all the American continents. At that time, the administrative authorities of the school believed that there was much to celebrate, as the institution had more than two thousand students enrolled, new higher education courses were being offered and expanded, and 75 percent of the construction works were completed. The governor of the state of São Paulo, Mário Covas (now deceased), was also present at the ceremony. He expressed his thought that Adventist education combined “education of the body with education of the mind.” Due to the celebration, 4 tons of food were collected.48

The year 1999 brought new accomplishments for the campus. On February 8, classes of the Business, Music, Civil Engineering and Translation and Interpretation programs began. In June, the first edition of the scientific review Acta Científica [Scientific Journal] was published, and the female dormitory chapel was inaugurated. The year also marked a new page in the history of Adventist education in Brazil. On September 9, the then president of Brazil, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, issued the decree to create the Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo [Brazil Adventist University] (UNASP), with Brazil College as maintainer.49 From this date on, UNASP started to be composed of two headquarters: São Paulo campus, located on Capão Redondo neighborhood, in the capital; and Engenheiro Coelho campus, in the countryside of the state. Consequently, the status of the two campuses changed, being called, respectively, Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo [Brazil Adventist University], São Paulo campus (UNASP-SP) and Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo [Brazil Adventist University], Engenheiro Coelho campus (UNASP-EC).50

Following the higher education expansion, at the beginning of the 2000s, several events made new achievements remarkable. In the year 2000, the Social Communication program was implanted, with the qualifications in Journalism and Advertising and Marketing. Its first class had 99 students.51 On May 7, the Agência IAE de Notícias [IAE News Agency] (presently known as Agência Brasileira de Jornalismo [Brazilian Journalism Agency] - ABJ) was established, an extension project of the Journalism course. In the same month, the Instituto de Línguas [Languages Institute] was inaugurated, and the Languages – Portuguese course received the highest grade from the Exame Nacional de Cursos [National Examination of Courses] (ENC). Still in 2000, the campus received improvements in infrastructure, such as paving the streets, parking lots and the entrance of the College. In 2001, between September 10 and 13, the campus hosted the first national meeting of educators (Encontro Nacional de Pedagogia or ENAP), and in 2002, the first National Symposium of Adventist University Students. Still in 2002, the classes of the Accounting Sciences course started.52 All these new developments of the college were recognized as divine blessings, and God was praised for them.

In 2003, UNASP-EC celebrated two decades of its establishment. To celebrate the occasion, on May 25, the campus hosted the event that gathered around eight thousand people, including the then governor of the state of São Paulo and the American singer Jennifer LaMountain. During the event, the Effluent Treatment Station was inaugurated, with a completely ecological and 100 percent natural sewage treatment process and the paving of the streets near the female dormitory. On the occasion of UNASP’s anniversary, the Centro de Pesquisas Ellen G. White [Ellen G. White Research Center] website and the first album by Coral UNASP entitled “Testemunhar do Amor” [Testify of Love] were launched. Other activities were also part of the celebration, such as an exhibition of the fourth National Exhibition of Plastic Arts (IV Salão Nacional de Artes Plásticas), with 138 works by 90 artists. The exhibition was organized by the Artistic Education course and the School of Arts of UNASP-EC.53

In the following year (2004), the Law program began to operate at UNASP-EC, with 87 students enrolled in the first class and, in the following year, with 167 students. In that year (2005), the institution reached a record enrollment of undergraduate students: 1,985 students. In 2005, the Basic School organized the first Environmental Exhibition (I Mostra Ambiental). In July, a group of 70 students and teachers participated in an evangelistic campaign with the Carajás Indians, on the island of Bananal, in the state of Tocantins. The same year, the construction work of the Sports Gymnasium began.54

On April 22, 2006, the campus church building was inaugurated, with a capacity for more than 2,500 people. At the inauguration, around 5,000 spectators attended, including the then Adventist world Church president, Pastor Jan Paulsen, who preached the sermon on Sabbath morning.55 In 2006, other inaugurations took place. The Agência de Publicidade Zoom [Zoom Advertising Agency], a UNASP institutional marketing agency, was created and, in the same year, the building of the Núcleo Multidisciplinar [Multidisciplinary Center] was built. In this building, the Zoom agency and the Distance Learning (EaD) center were installed.56

On May 26, 2007, on the occasion of the institution’s twenty-fourth anniversary, Rádio Unasp [UNASP Radio] was inaugurated. At the FM 91.3 frequency, with a signal reaching cities in the College vicinity within the distance of 30 kilometers, the radio has the potential to reach around 724 thousand people.57 On August 20, 2007, the radio went on the air for the first time. Also, in that year, the students participated for the first time in the “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact],58 of the South American Division. On September 6, 20 buses filled with volunteer missionaries left UNASP-EC for the city of Campinas, where more than 50 thousand copies of the magazine “Viva com Esperança” [Living with Hope] were distributed.59

In 2008, the College celebrated its 25th anniversary. In the second semester of that academic year, the college held the first Annual Scientific Initiation Encounter meeting (Encontro Anual de Iniciação Científica or ENAIC) between October 24 and 26.60 The Higher Education building was also inaugurated then. In addition, the students engaged in community and welfare activities in the municipality of Engenheiro Coelho as part of the first Day of Social Responsibility (Dia da Responsabilidade Social). As part of the celebrations, in November, the Enciclopédia Nacional da Memória Adventista [National Encyclopedia of Adventist Memory] was launched, published on the Ellen G. White Research Center website. Other inaugural events took place in the second half of 2009. The Information Technology course classes started, with 17 students. The male dormitory chapel and the renovated Ellen G. White Research Center were inaugurated on November 13.61

In February 2010, the Information Technology course reached 65 students, and the History course started at UNASP-EC, with 51 students enrolled. Thus, the campus reached the enrollment of 2,692 students in higher education. In May, the activities of “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact] were greater than in the previous years: 29 buses and another 50 cars with students and teachers left UNASP-EC towards the municipalities of Limeira, Cordeirópolis, Iracemápolis and Tatuí, all in the state of São Paulo, for missionary activities. In the month of December, the archeologist and professor Paulo Bork visited the campus, bringing donations of new archaeological pieces to the Museu de Arqueologia Bíblica do UNASP [UNASP Biblical Archeology Museum] (MAB), established in 1999. Two years later, Dr. Milton Afonso also donated around 1,600 artifacts, including coins, objects, and rare books to the collection.62

To assist in music lessons, in 2011, the Piano Laboratory was inaugurated, with eight instruments. The review Kerygma was also launched that year, a scientific review whose main goal is to offer tools for the promotion of research in the area of Religion and Theology. In the infrastructure sector, expansions of the Higher Education Building began.63 In 2012, the classes of the Master in Business Administration in Leadership program started. This course, which continues to operate, is conducted in a partnership with Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, U.S.A., and is directed to church administrators and workers.64

The year 2013 marked the history of UNASP-EC, with the campus’ 30th anniversary. At that time, the number of students had increased from more than 5,000 enrolled, from elementary to higher education, with 1,600 studying as boarding students. The institution offered 14 options for higher education and 23 postgraduate courses. The Architecture and Urbanism course started its activities this year (2013), with 133 students enrolled. In this context of growth, the anniversary celebrations were divided into three stages. The first took place in May, with a concert that opened the celebrations. The other two stages took place in the second half of the year when UNASP brand and college magazine were launched in October.65

As the need for and interest in other programs arose, the school administration initiated the procedures for their implementation. In the next three years, two new programs were implemented at UNASP-EC. The first, in 2014, was Social Communication – Radio and TV. The second, in 2016, was the Agronomic Engineering course. Also, in 2016, the Fazendinha [Little Farm] was created, a special place for recreation and learning with animals and the farm environment. The area seeks to cultivate a rural environment typical of colonial Brazil, with flour houses, milling, cassava and cane fields. In 2017, after a substantial increase in the number of academic programs over the years, the campus reached a remarkable enrollment of 4,139 students in higher education.

The year 2017 was also marked by several inaugurations in the campus. The first was the Center for Spiritual and Cultural Development building (the Centro de Desenvolvimento Espiritual e Cultural), which comprises the children’s classes at the church’s Sabbath School. In this building, there are 15 rooms on the ground floor and a central garden, and a basement with space for storage, a free area, and several suites. In the next building, the campus church building, a new facade was built, an architecture that changed the external look and expanded the entrance that gives access to the church building. Another innovation was the Village Inn, a hotel built on campus. This hotel consists of 44 large rooms. The structure provides accommodation for up to 400 people.66

In 2017, the new building of the Rectory and Distance Education was inaugurated, with the function of serving 20 educational centers throughout Brazil.67 The building has three floors and a penthouse. On the ground floor, there is an auditorium for 152 people, and two floors are used for offices and meeting rooms. One of these rooms is located on the penthouse, with 22 seats, surrounded by glass that provides a panoramic view of the campus. Currently, the following entities operate in this building: the Rectory of the Brazil Adventist University - Tricampi; the Virtual Center of UNASP, which works with Distance Education; and the Imprensa Universitária Adventista [Adventist University Press] (UNASPRESS), the publisher of UNASP.68

In 2018, the college celebrated its 35th anniversary. Steve Green gave a concert, 20 years after his first performance on campus. The same year, a bicycle path was built along the access road to the campus, the Pastor Walter Boger Municipal Road. In 2018, UNASP-EC had 3,846 students enrolled. This entire student body was served by 800 workers, among whom were 260 teachers.

In 2019, two higher education programs were opened: Pharmacy, with 29 students enrolled in the first semester; and Psychology, with 129 students enrolled.69 The establishment of these programs marked a new stage in educational development on the campus, as the first undergraduate programs in the health area. In 2020, the Veterinary Medicine program started, and, currently, Dentistry is waiting for government approval to start in the coming years.

Historical Role of the School

When the first Adventist school began its activities in the city of Battle Creek, in the United States, in 1872, it was an initiative that would cross borders and establish itself in many countries of the world. The establishment of Adventist schools was in accordance with Ellen G. White’s prophetic leadership and thus has the goal to achieve the divine ideal70 of “the harmonious development of the physical, the mental, and the spiritual powers,” in preparation for this life and for eternity.71 The commitment to biblical values has motivated institutions like UNASP to influence their surroundings with their presence, as well as to train and instruct their teachers and students so that the message of the gospel is disseminated in Brazil and in the world.

The school has been involved in serving other countries through the Church Growth and Missions Center (the Núcleo de Missões e Crescimento de Igreja or NUMCI). The purpose of this missionary branch of the school is to develop understanding and promote the participation of students and others in God’s mission. The center was created by UNASP-EC in 2007, and, since then, it has served the world Church with the preparation of volunteers who wish to go to the various parts of the world. Missionaries prepared at NUMCI have been sent to countries such as Peru, Mozambique, Niger, Albania, Greece, Lebanon, China, India, among others. Many activities are carried out on these trips, such as health actions, construction of church buildings, and evangelistic campaign.72

At the national level, the academic institutional impact of UNASP-EC can be seen in the awards that the college has received in recent years. One of these recognitions came from Guia do Estudante [Student Guide], from the Brazilian publishing house Abril, a nationally renowned institution. Guia do Estudante ranks programs and universities, with five stars being the maximum score. In 2016, UNASP-EC was among the 30 best educational institutions in the state of São Paulo. Guia do Estudante also evaluates all higher education programs in Brazil, and after evaluating 13,400 graduations, UNASP entered the ranking with excellent marks for its Journalism, Accounting, Business, Education, Law, Languages – Portuguese, Civil Engineering, and Advertising and Marketing programs.73

UNASP’s influence can also be seen at the regional level. The institution’s missionary vocation contributed to the establishment of many churches. At the college’s twentieth anniversary, in 2003, there were already 20 churches in the region, fruits of the evangelistic work developed by its students and staff.74 This shows that UNASP-EC has been committed to involving its leaders, staff, and students in the proclamation of the gospel. The institution remains committed to this purpose and offers opportunities to students and staff to serve. Among the many initiatives are the following projects: “Atos Kids” [Acts Kids], which consists of working with children at the shelters and Associations of Parents and Friends of Disabled People (Associações de Pais e Amigos dos Excepcionais or APAEs)75 in the needy regions;76 Naaman Project (Projeto Naamã), which assists the work of the recovery clinics for drug addicts, sharing basic principles of health, law and spirituality; Project Urban Aid (Ajuda Urbana), which shelters homeless people, with the goal of reintegrating them into society; the program 9214 Generation (Geração 9214), which provides care to the elderly in the community homes;77 Tone that Heals (Tom que Cura) that makes visits to hospitals to bring comfort, joy and hope of healing through music therapy; Get to Work (Mão na Massa), which carries out reforms in the homes of needy people and institutions, providing better quality of life to beneficiaries; Urban Vegetable Garden (Horta Urbana), which shares agricultural knowledge and techniques for the cultivation of vegetable gardens in communities and organizations, with the goal of contributing to people’s income and physical health.78 All of these programs are designed to carry the gospel message while seeking to alleviate human suffering and make the school environment a better place to live

What Remains to be Done to Fulfill the School Mission

The commitment to the Word of God and the Adventist educational mission, shown by the first workers who arrived on campus, continues to be seen in all those who help to write this institution's academic and missionary success story. Through the tireless efforts of leaders, teachers, other staff, and students, the Seventh-day Adventist message has reached thousands of people who have had contact with the institution over its 37 years of existence.

During the school’s history, unremitting efforts have been made to fulfill the mission of “educating in the context of biblical values for a full life and for excellence in service to God and humanity.”79 As a flag raised by God for the service of the gospel, UNASP-EC will continue to strive to be a benchmark in Adventist, professional and religious education, in Brazil and in the world. Thus, it intends to remain firm with its vision of “being an educational institution recognized for the excellence in the services provided, for its high ethical standards, and for the personal and professional quality of its graduates.”80

Chronology of Directors

Novo Instituto Adventista de Ensino [New Brazil College] and Novo IAE [New IAE (1983-1987): Walter Boger (1983); Edmir de Oliveira (1984); Arthur Dassow (1985-1986); Walter Boger (1987-1997).

Instituto Adventista de Ensino - Campus Artur Nogueira [Brazil College - Artur Nogueira campus] (1988): Walter Boger (1987-1997).

Instituto Adventista de Ensino - Campus Central [Brazil College - Central Campus] (IAE-Ct) (1991-1998): Walter Boger (1987-1997); Levi Borreli (1997); Daniel Baía (1998-2003).

Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo [Brazil Adventist University] (UNASP-EC) (1999-present): Daniel Baía (1998-2003); Paulo Martini (2004-2018); Antônio Marcos Alves (2018-present).

Sources

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Adventist Organizational Directory. http://www.adventistdirectory.org/.

Amaral, Fabiana, e Fernando Torres. “Escola Madura” [Mature School]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 98 (July 2003).

Apae Brasil [Apae Brazil]. https://apae.com.br/.

Associação Paulista Central [Central São Paulo Conference]. https://apac.adventistas.org/.

Azevedo, Roberto C. “O Último Decreto” [The Last Decree]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September 1983).

Borges, Michelson. “IAE: 15 anos” [IAE: 15 years]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 94 (July 1998).

Borges, Michelson. “Unasp dedica maior templo adventista do brasil” [Unasp dedicates the largest Adventist temple in Brazil]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 101 (June 2006).

Cidades IBGE [IBGE Cities]. https://cidades.ibge.gov.br/.

“Colégios em Festa” [Schools celebrating]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1206, year 103, December 2008.

Da Redação [From the Editorial Staff]. “As estrelas do Guia do Estudante” [The stars of the Student Guide]. Unasp Notícias [Unasp News] (Online), 12 de setembro de 2014.

Da Redação [From the Editorial Staff]. “Conheça a História de Engenheiro Coelho” [Know the History of Engenheiro Coelho]. Coelhense (Online), May 30, 2017.

“Educação, Saúde e Comunicação” [Education, Health, and Communication]. Revista da I Assembleia Quadrienal da Corporação da União Central-Brasileira da IASD e XXIV Assembleia Quadrienal da União Sul-Brasileira da IASD [Review of the I Quadrennial Assembly of the Corporation of the Central Brazil Union Conference of the SDA and XXIV Quadrennial Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference of the SDA], October 30 to November 2, 1988.

“Em 90, Novo IAE Será Sonho ou Realidade” [In the 1990s, New IAE will be dream or reality]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 83, March 1988.

Gross, Renato. “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education]. In: Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2 15 Years of History]. Alberto R. Timm, Editor. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Guarda, Márcio Dias. “Muito Além do Ensino” [Far Beyond Teaching]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015).

Huf, Alysson (associate editor of UNASPRESS). E-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

“IAE já tem novo terreno” [IAE already has a new land]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 78, November 1983.

“Inaugurações” [Inaugurations]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1325, year 112, September 2017.

Lima, Suzaeny, and Fernando Dias de Souza. “Celeiro de Líderes” [Barn of Leaders]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1262, year 108 (July 2013).

“New SDA University in Brazil.” Australasian Record, August 31, 1985.

“Novo IAE comemora décimo aniversário” [New IAE celebrates its 10th anniversary]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 89, November 1993.

“Novo IAE está completando 10 Anos” [New IAE is celebrating its 10th anniversary]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 89, July 1993.

Pasini, André M. “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development]. In: Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History]. Alberto R. Timm, Editor. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Perez, Joubert Castro. “Programações Socioculturais e Religiosas do IAE-C2” [IAE-C2 Sociocultural and Religious Programs]. In: Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History]. Alberto R. Timm, Editor. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Portal da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia [Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website]. https://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Portal de periódicos UNASP [UNASP journals website]. https://revistas.unasp.edu.br/index.

Portugal, Nathalia. “Qual a diferença entre EJA e Supletivo?” [What is the difference between EJA and Supplementary course?]. Catho Educação [Catho Education] (Online), April 2, 2019.

“Primeira Etapa” [First Step]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 80, October 1985.

Redação [Editorial Staff]. “Mestrado em Liderança inicia aulas da 3ª turma” [Master's degree in Leadership starts lessons for the 3rd class]. UNASP, August 8, 2014.

Santos, Luís Henrique dos, editor. 2015. UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP: Far Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)]. Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015.

Timm, Alberto R. “Internatos Adventistas: Núcleos de Educação Integral” [Adventist Boarding Schools: Integral Education Centers]. In: Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History]. Alberto R. Timm, Editor. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Toledo, Simone, and Lisandra Matias. “Entenda os critérios do Prêmio Melhores Universidades 2017” [Understand the criteria of the 2017 Best Universities Award]. Guia do Estudante [Student Guide] (Online), October 11, 2017.

UNASP’s official website. https://www.unasp.br/ec/.

“Vendemos” [We sold it]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 86, March 1991.

White, Ellen G. Educação [Education]. Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 1997.

Notes

  1. UNASP, “Cursos EC” [EC Courses], accessed on June 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2yXW4LR.

  2. Suzete Gabas (Engineering Department of UNASP-EC), e-mail message to the author, December 13, 2019.

  3. Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of UNASP-EC Board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), September 13, 2019; Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of UNASP-EC Board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), September 16, 2019.

  4. Roberto C. Azevedo, “O Último Decreto” [The Last Decree], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September 1983): 21-22. 

  5. Ibid.

  6. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  7. Roberto C. Azevedo, “O Último Decreto” [The Last Decree], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September 1983): 21-22.

  8. Suzaeny Lima and Fernando Dias de Souza, “Celeiro de Líderes” [Barn of Leaders], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1262, year 108 (July 2013): 37.

  9. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 11.

  10. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for being the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  11. “IAE já tem novo terreno” [IAE already has a new land], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 78, November 1983, 21.

  12. “New SDA University in Brazil,” Australasian Record, August 31, 1985, 14.

  13. “IAE já tem novo terreno” [IAE already has a new land], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 78, November 1983, 22.

  14. Ibid.

  15. Darci Mendes de Borba (ex-president of the UCB), interviewed by the author, Engenheiro Coelho, São Paulo, May 28, 2019.

  16. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019; André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 11.

  17. “Educação, Saúde e Comunicação” [Education, Health, and Communication], Revista da I Assembleia Quadrienal da Corporação da União Central-Brasileira da IASD e XXIV Assembleia Quadrienal da União Sul-Brasileira da IASD [Review of the I Quadrennial Assembly of the Corporation of the Central Brazil Union Conference of the SDA and XXIV Quadrennial Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference of the SDA], October 30 to November 2, 1988. 51. 

  18. Joubert Castro Perez, “Programações Socioculturais e Religiosas do IAE-C2” [IAE-C2 Sociocultural and Religious Programs], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 68.

  19. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  20. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 13.

  21. “Educação, Saúde e Comunicação” [Education, Health, and Communication], Revista da I Assembleia Quadrienal da Corporação da União Central-Brasileira da IASD e XXIV Assembleia Quadrienal da União Sul-Brasileira da IASD [Review of the I Quadrennial Assembly of the Corporation of the Central Brazil Union Conference of the SDA and XXIV Quadrennial Assembly of the South Brazil Union Conference of the SDA], October 30 to November 2, 1988. 51.

  22. “A Primeira Pedra do Novo IAE” [The First Stone of the New IAE], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 79, July 1984, 23-24.

  23. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 14.

  24. Ensino Supletivo [Supplementary Education] is approved by the Brazilian Ministry of Education and Culture (MEC). It is a program offered at some educational institutions, with the aim of making it possible for people who have not finished their studies to do so in a shorter time. Nowadays, it has another name: Educação para Jovens e Adultos [Education for Youth and Adults] (EJA). Nathalia Portugal, “Qual a diferença entre EJA e Supletivo?” [What is the difference between EJA and Supplementary course?], Catho Educação [Catho Education], April 2, 2019, accessed on December 11, 2019; https://bit.ly/35DRPQo.

  25. “Primeira Etapa” [First Step], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 80, October 1985, 32-33.

  26. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 14.

  27. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), email message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  28. Residencial Lagoa Bonita is a condominium where most of the workers reside, including teachers, pastors, and some UNASP-EC administrators. Initially, this area belonged to the school land. “Vendemos” [We sold it], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 86, March 1991, 33.

  29. “Em 90, Novo IAE Será Sonho ou Realidade” [In the 1990s, New IAE will be dream or reality], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 83, March 1988, 24.

  30. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  31. Ibid.

  32. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 30.

  33. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 15.

  34. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 31.

  35. “Novo IAE está completando 10 Anos” [New IAE is celebrating its 10th anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 89, July 1993, 14.

  36. The International Chan Shun Foundation, based in Taiwan, China, is a company linked to the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, which funds Church projects and educational entities worldwide. The name was given in memory of Chan Shun, an Adventist and Chinese philanthropist. Adventist Organizational Directory, “Chan Shun International Foundation,” accessed on June 9, 2020, https://bit.ly/37gkxbL.

  37. IBGE, “Engenheiro Coelho, São Paulo,” accessed on December 17, 2019, https://bit.ly/2M5y2Sf.

  38. Da Redação [From the Editorial Staff], “Conheça a História de Engenheiro Coelho” [Know the History of Engenheiro Coelho], Coelhense, May 30, 2017, accessed on December 17, 2019, https://bit.ly/2YXqI0b.

  39. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 30.

  40. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  41. “Novo IAE comemora décimo aniversário” [New IAE celebrates its 10th anniversary], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 89, November 1993, 27-28.

  42. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 15.

  43. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 31.

  44. Alysson Huf (associate editor of UNASPRESS), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  45. Ibid.

  46. Ibid.

  47. Ibid.

  48. Michelson Borges, “IAE: 15 anos” [IAE: 15 years], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 94 (July 1998): 13-15.

  49. Marcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” “[Far Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015): 14-19.

  50. Luís Henrique dos Santos, ed., UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP: Far Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)] (Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015), 256.

  51. Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of the UNASP-EC board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), September 13, 2019; Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of the UNASP-EC board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), September 16, 2019.

  52. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  53. Fabiana Amaral and Fernando Torres, “Escola Madura” [Mature School], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 98 (July 2003): 26.

  54. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  55. Michelson Borges, “Unasp dedica maior templo adventista do brasil” [Unasp dedicates the largest Adventist temple in Brazil], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 101 (June 2006): 28.

  56. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  57. UNASP, “Abrangência” [Scope], accessed on December 12, 2019, https://bit.ly/36IlOH0.

  58. “The Hope Impact Project encourages reading and provides a huge annual distribution of books by Seventh-day Adventists in the territory of South America.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact Project], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  59. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  60. “Colégios em Festa” [Schools celebrating], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1206, year 103, December 2008, 24.

  61. Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of the UNASP-EC board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), September 11, 2019.

  62. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  63. Portal de periódicos UNASP [UNASP journals website], “Sobre a Revista” [About the Review], accessed on October 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/3jnk9MY; Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), email message sent to the author on June 26, 2019.

  64. Editorial staff, “Mestrado em Liderança inicia aulas da 3ª turma” [Master's degree in Leadership starts lessons for the 3rd class], UNASP, August 8, 2014, accessed on June 9, 2020, https://bit.ly/2XNmppq.

  65. Suzaeny Lima and Fernando Dias de Souza, “Celeiro de Líderes” [Barn of Leaders], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1262, year 108 (July 2013): 37.

  66. Sara Caron, interviewed by phone by the author, Engenheiro Coelho, São Paulo, December 12, 2019.

  67. “Inaugurações” [Inaugurations], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1325, year 112, September 2017, 9.

  68. Suzete Gabas (UNASP-EC Engineering Department), e-mail message sent to the author, December 13, 2019.

  69. Alysson Huf (UNASPRESS associated editor), e-mail message to the author, June 26, 2019.

  70. Alberto R. Timm, “Internatos Adventistas: Núcleos de Educação Integral” [Adventist Boarding Schools: Integral Education Centers], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College - Campus 2: 15 years of History], ed. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Imprensa Universitária Adventista [Adventist University Press], 1999), 1.

  71. Ellen G. White, Educação [Education] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1997), 7.

  72. Ibid.

  73. Simone Toledo and Lisandra Matias, “Entenda os critérios do Prêmio Melhores Universidades 2017” [Understand the criteria of the 2017 Best Universities Award], and Guia do Estudante [Student Guide], October 11, 2017; https://bit.ly/2stANWv; Da Redação [From the Editorial Staff], “As estrelas do Guia do Estudante” [The stars of the Student Guide], Unasp Notícias [Unasp News], September 12, 2014, accessed on June 24, 2020, https://bit.ly/37WQ0QC.

  74. Ibid.

  75. The Associação de Pais e Amigos dos Excepcionais [Association of Parents and Friends of Disabled People] (APAE) is a “social organization, whose main goal is to promote comprehensive care for people with intellectual and multiple disabilities.” Apae Brasil, “Conheça a APAE” [About APAE], accessed on June 8, 2020, https://bit.ly/37haTpl.

  76. Kerilin Magaieski (assistant secretary of the UNASP-EC board), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associated editor), September 11, 2019.

  77. Ibid.

  78. Ibid.

  79. UNASP, “Missão” [Mission], accessed on October 23, 2020, https://www.unasp.br/sobre-o-unasp/.

  80. UNASP, “Visão” [Vision], accessed on October 23, 2020, https://www.unasp.br/sobre-o-unasp/.

×

Silva, Renato Ferreira. "Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 10, 2021. Accessed May 20, 2022. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GGV.

Silva, Renato Ferreira. "Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. June 10, 2021. Date of access May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GGV.

Silva, Renato Ferreira (2021, June 10). Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho Campus. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved May 20, 2022, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=4GGV.