River Plate Adventist University

By Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Silvia C. Scholtus

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Eugenio Di Dionisio

Silvia C. Scholtus

River Plate Adventist University (Universidad Adventista del Plata or UAP) is a university educational institution of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church that operates in the territory of the Argentina Union Conference (UA). It is located on 25 de Mayo Street, no. 99, in the municipality of Libertador San Martín, Department of Diamante, province of Entre Ríos, in the Argentine Republic.1

The UAP occupies a geographical area of 330 hectares and the institutional part, the Educational Complex River Plate, offers early childhood, primary, secondary, and tertiary education through the Primary School Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, no. 104; River Plate Adventist Academy mid-Level D-4 and River Plate Adventist Academy, Top-Level D-222. The total number of students was 3,521 in 2018, with 569 at the primary level, 377 at the secondary level, 156 at the River Plate College, and 2,419 at the university level.

The number of workers in the service at the UAP is 44, and there are employees 977. The number of teachers is 650. The workers with ministerial credentials are 19 and one with a ministerial license. The UAP has the following mission statement: “To train competent, ethically responsible professionals who foster and practice love and service to God and his fellow men, based on the Christian worldview that underpins the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.”2

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the School

The Adventist message arrived in Argentina in South America for the first time through the sending of publications (in the mid-1880s), then by the arrival of lay missionaries (1890), canvassers (1891), and an ordained pastor (1894). With the latter taking place, the first churches were organized;3 thereafter, the first educational institutions, medical, publishing house, and food factory were established.

In 1898, at the end of September on a Monday afternoon before closing down the general meeting of Adventists that was commonly held every year in Crespo, Entre Rios, American missionary Frank (Francisco) Henry Westphal (1858-1944) and other members of the Adventist Church perceived that a young man was approaching with a Bible in one hand and a briefcase in the other. He was Luis Ernst (1874-1952), a young man whom Westphal had met during his ministry in Nueva Helvecia, Uruguay. Ernst told the missionary that he had come to this meeting convinced that he would go to study at the school he assumed existed, and then work in Bible studies. To Ernst's disappointment, Westphal told him that there was no such school or teachers.4

After learning the reason for the young man’s presence on the premises, Pastor Frank, initiating an extraordinary meeting, presented the young man’s intentions to the members of the Church present. Interested in the matter, the parishioners, with a favorable attitude, agreed and voted that a missionary academy should be started. Thus, at that session, the decision that created the academy was taken on Monday, September 26, 1898. In the same way, The Mission Board met to agree that this was the right time to launch a campaign for the creation of an educational institution, so they began to ask for donations for this purpose.5 On this same occasion, Brother Jorge Lust (1856-1929), a farmer, donated 17 hectares of land in Colonia Camarero, Entre Rios, to establish the Academy.6

Meanwhile, Pastor Westphal took responsibility for being the teacher of young Ernst, his first pupil. They both eventually came to help each other. The young apprentice interpreted from German to Spanish for the pastor during his many missionary journeys that they carried out together and the pastor, now a teacher, transmitted to the young man his knowledge in history, grammar, and theology.7

School Foundation

For this institution to emerge where young people would come from different parts of Argentina and South America to be missionaries, they had to raise money and buy materials. To make this venture happen, they joined with Brother Lust, others helped with money, others donated hectares of wheat, and Brother Pedro Peverini (1849-1933) offered to collaborate with the construction. In this way, all the Brothers began to develop the project of school creation that had the support of Pastor Frank Westphal, leader and president of the Mission of the eastern coast of South America, at that time.8

Pastor Nelson Zane Town (1863-1936), who had moved to Entre Rios to serve as secretary and treasurer of the Society of the Mission Treaties,9 during the following year on January 20, 1899, came to serve as their first director and teacher; and with his wife, Sadie R. Graham, he conducted the first courses of the Academy, beginning provisionally in a rented house in Las Tunas, province of Santa Fe. In the early years of school, no grades of instruction and a defined curriculum were established. Teachers were limited to only one or two.10 The first course offered was the preparation for missionaries dedicated to the distribution of evangelistic publications. Soon after that, teacher A. T. from Learsy, who taught everything about the Bible and other matters, joined them. The first six students were: Diriwachter, Streuli, Rostan, Hammerly, Guerin, and Peverini. This first course ended on March 17, and then teachers and students set out for a period to put their studies into practice.11

Academy History, with an Emphasis on Events and Time Periods

The second course began on June 20 with 29 students, ranging from 7 to 30 years old. In the afternoon, the activities of the primary school were held, and in the morning the activities of the secondary school took place with 10 students. The teaching included: language, mathematics, music, hygiene, and sacred history. Meanwhile, in Entre Rios, the first 80,000 bricks were being transported to the school.12

On July 22 and 23, 1899, there was a general meeting of Adventists in Las Tunas chaired by Pastor Westphal. There, the final decision was made to move the school to the province of Camarero, which is nowadays called Entre Rios.13 And on October 17, the construction of the first building began, and its builder was Pedro Peverini. However, this buidling does not exist anymore. The original building of the Camarero Academy, built in 1900, had six parts and served all uses. In this way, in 1900, the institution that began in Las Tunas moved to Camarero14 and later, in 1907, changed its name to River Plate Adventist Academy (Colegio Adventista del Plata or CAP).15 Classes began on April 18, 1900, with 15 students and ended on September 20 with 23.16 basic knowledge of the Bible, History, Geography, Music, Physiology, and Hygiene were taught. The teachers of the institution were Nelson Town and James A. Leland.17

In 1901, a donation of 500 copies of the book Christ’s Object Lessons by Ellen G. White arrived from The United States to be sold and pay off debts. In 1902, Robert Habenicht joined the medical mission, and he became the founder of the River Plate Adventist Sanitarium and taught physiology, hygiene, and vocal music at the Camarero Academy.18 In 1904, the first graduates were sent as missionaries to Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay. By 1904, the curriculum was already more defined, and students were separated by their age. Camarero Academy was also the birthplace of important institutions such as the South American Publishing House Association and Alimentos Granix. In 1905, another project was completed at the school: the printing press. That year, the first issue of the Present Truth was published, but then it was moved to Florida in 1906.19

In 1908, there were 86 students and eight school masters and teachers. The new principal Walton John Brown reorganized the curriculum with six grades in primary and four in the secondary level. Later it was called “Missionary Course” and led to the Organization of Missionary Society. An additional 30 were acquired for the school during its administration.20 In 1909, Ellen White donated 264 copies of the book Lecciones prácticas del Gran Maestro (Christ’s Object Lessons) to subsidize the construction of school buildings.21 That year, the three-year nursing course for the River Plate Adventist Sanitarium began at the school, including complementary courses in cooking, hydrotherapy, and massages.22 Still, in the same year, a new building (nowadays a music school) was inaugurated, with two floors of 15x15 meters, with classrooms and offices for the administration, part of which served as a hall of public acts and a chapel for 21 years.

In 1909, the “Missionary Course” with a specialty in Bible and History began, and enrollment increased to 124 students.23 Years later, in 1912, the first graduation of the High School and the Nursing School that continued to operate in the neighboring Sanitarium was carried out. Since 1912, travel was facilitated with the creation of the railway between Diamante and Crespo and the establishment of Puiggari station. In addition, the first library was created in a classroom. And by 1913, the first three students of the Missionary course graduated. Within 1914 and 1916, plans were adopted to formalize primary school courses. The female boarding school with a kitchen and dining room was inaugurated in 1915. In 1917, the envisaged plan of the five-year course of missionary nurses began.

By 1920, the academy offered four courses: Magisterium, Secretariat, Theology, and Biblical Instruction.24 The review, La Voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], began its publishing in 1923 with Hugo P. Beskow as first director. The first school building was used as a male dormitory until the new male’s boarding school began to be used in 1922. By 1924, the denominational status of tertiary educational institution was received, and a construction program was started that led to a growth from six to twenty-five buildings. The institution went on to develop other industries, such as a bakery, carpentry, and car construction.25 In 1926, two more years of study were added to the courses mentioned at the beginning. In 1927, extraordinary improvements were made to the farm, including cows were bought and a model tambo26 was erected, that received various awards and recognitions.27 The corn flakes manufactured at the school received the name, “Granix,” and in 1935, the production of corn flakes moved to Florida, Buenos Aires, to start the factory food Granix.28

In the 1940s, the organization evaluated the possibility of moving the school to Pilar, province of Buenos Aires, and even Uruguay. But the original location prevailed, despite isolation and bad roads.29 In 1946, the construction of the temple of CAP was completed with 1,000 seats,30 known today as the Hall of the Pioneers. In addition, in the same year, the seven-year primary school and the five-year secondary school (officially recognized in 1945) were established, continuing with two years of Higher Education. In 1948 the primary school building was inaugurated, and the library occupied the former chapel of the Germans.31

In 1954, the theological course was reorganized, adding another year of studies and the so-called Theological Pavilion, which included the previous science building. It was erected in 1958, a building that, with various parts, continues in use (for other university careers). In 1959, the Theology career was extended to four years. In the Spring of that year, the Pathfinders Club32 (one of the first of the South Union, presently the Argentina Union) was created at CAP, which had Elvira W. Schmidt as their principal. On October 26, 1960, its activities began as a club and was led by its director, Lucas Shulz. On July 21, 1962, the Dogs Club (now the Adventurers) and Sentinel Club (presently Major Guides) began.

In 1961, the dining room was opened to replace the previous one that existed in the boarding school for young ladies. In 1962, the Theology and Education College began. In 1964, CAP lifted its characteristic entrance portico.33 In 1967, the Institute of Correspondence Studies began operating with 100 students from the country and abroad. In the same year, teachers of pedagogy and philosophy, as well as economic sciences, began, and it received official accreditation two years later. The following year, in 1968, the 70th anniversary of CAP was celebrated and, until that time, the Academy had already prepared 1,000 workers working in different parts of the world.34 In the same year, the second male boarding school was begun, and 11 years later, the female boarding school was completed, and it had a capacity of 200 female students.35

At the beginning of the 1970s, the academic offer of CAP consisted of: Faculty of Economic Sciences (four years with official title), Professorship Pedagogy (four years with official title), Teacher Elementary (two years with an official title), Secretariat Administration (two years with an official title that was achieved the following year), Theology (four years with possibilities for further combined studies with the faculty or more advanced study).36

In 1971, an auditorium/gym of 2,870 m2 (82 x 35 meters) began to be built, which would have the capacity for 3,500 people. Then, just after the diamond jubilee (75 years) of CAP in 1973, the Institution had 200 students at the tertiary level and the following units: Higher Institute of Theology (offered B.A. in Theology, B.A. in Religion, and High School Seminarian) and the Higher Institute of Teacher Training (with College of Economics, Technical, Secretarial, Teaching Primary, and Secretarial Commercial).37 As early as 1974, the auditorium was opened as was the previous library. This auditorium was later used as a meeting hall for the University Church meetings (1994-2011). And in 1976, a new building was built for the D. F. Elementary School. Sarmiento.

In 1977, after 10 years of operation, the Institute of Correspondence Studies had reached 1,355 students enrolled. However, they provided academic services only until the 1990s, when gradually it was replaced by new attempts at distance education with new technologies.38 In 1979, the Board of Directors of the South American Division organized the Latin American Adventist Seminary of Theology (Seminario Adventista Latinoamericano de Teologia or SALT), which included five theological schools of the higher schools in its territory. The Theology Department of CAP offered careers not officially recognized by the National Ministry of Education although they were accredited by the SDA Church. SALT has been integrated into the Association of Seminaries and Theological Institutions of Southern Cone (ASIT) based in Buenos Aires. Further, another important moment at this time was the inauguration of the historical-theological Documentation Center “Ellen G. White,” on September 9, 1979, a contribution to the formation of CAP educational community and for future SALT students.39 In the future, the White Center would move from the administration building to Fernando Chaij building.

The achievements since the 1980s, including the administration building, the classroom building, and the 2,833 m2 Library, have provided support for teaching and management tasks. At the beginning of 1980, the institution had 500 tertiary students.40 Moreover, with the organization of SALT, from 1980, the theological course joined this institution so that SALT came to offer the following curriculums: (1) Bible Bachelor Degree, one year; (2) Certificate of Theological Complementarity for university professionals; (3) Bible Instructor, two years; (4) Four-year Religion Teacher; (5) Four-year degree in Theology; (6) Four-year Bachelor Degree in Religion; (7) Master's degree in Religion, four years (two months in the summer); and (8) Master's degree in Theology. Then, in January 1981, SALT graduate classes began being offered at the Argentina headquarters. The first act of SALT degrees occurred in 1984.41 In 1988, coinciding with the 90th anniversary of CAP, the second graduation of SALT was held, awarding Master’s degrees in Theology and a Master’s degree in Religion.42

Later, under the direction Emilio Vogel, it was understood that the tertiary formation of CAP attracted fewer and fewer students and that the financial outlook of the future was dark. For this reason, an internal commission was appointed to study the feasibility of becoming an university. Juan Carlos Olmedo coordinated the studies, and the new rector, Carlos Morales, set out to accomplish this task. Accordingly, on October 25, 1989, the Ministry of Education was given the request for the creation of the River Plate Adventist University. The “River Plate Adventist University project” was elevated to the National Directorate of Universities of the Ministry of Education and Justice of the nation.43 Architect Federico Sharp was the technical manager of the project.

Thus, on November 27,1990, the Minister of Education of the Nation, Prof. Antonio Salonia, by Ministerial Resolution no. 2241/90 of December 7, 1990, created the River Plate Adventist University. The inaugurating ceremony was held on the December 15th, 1990, chaired by the governor of Entre Rios, Dr. Jorge Pedro Busti, and the national Minister of Education. Since then, River Plate Adventist Academy has been called The River Plate Adventist University, and the chairman of the Board of Directors of the UAP was the president of the South Union of the SDA Church, Dr. Ruben Pereyra, and the first Rector of the UAP was the Lic. Carlos Morales. It should be remembered that the UAP was the first non-Catholic confessional University in Argentina Republic and offered 12 tertiary-level courses and postgraduate courses.44

Once established as a University, the UAP began its provisional operation with four faculties: Theology, Humanities, Economic Sciences, and Health Sciences. A new one would be added in the future: Agro-Food Sciences.45 In 1991, the College of Health Sciences began its operation with the authorization to start careers in the area of Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Nursing. However, only the nursing career was dictated.

In 1992, a hotel was bought to best serve the housing needs of teachers, students, and visitors. Furthermore, the building of the dean’s office and other facilities for the College of Health Sciences are noteworthy. The Fernando Chaij Building includes the E. I. Mohr Library, The David Ryhs Museum, The Technology Center for Self-Learning, the White Research Center, and the Raúl Cesán Auditorium. The medical and bachelor’s degree in Information Systems began to be taught in 1994 and, in 2002, the UAP obtained definitive national accreditation from the Argentine government. Years later, other careers were added to the College of Health Sciences, such as Nutrition, Kinesiology, and Odontology. Similarly, the College of Economics and Administration also added an engineering career in Information Systems.

Another breakthrough that occurred at the UAP took place on November 1, 2013, with the inauguration of the new Theology Building next to the temple complex of the UAP. The building has five classrooms equipped with excellent technological resources and air conditioning plus a multipurpose room.46 The Pastoral District of the UAP serves the following congregations: The Church of the University, The Church of Victoria, the isolated members of Cerro Pajonal ,and Rincón del Doll. The UAP Church currently has 1,593 members.

Similarly, the modern food factory Ceapé was launched with a building of 5,500 square meters. Apart from these completions on campus, mention could also be made of the heated swimming pool and Physical Education Complex, the tutoring building, the prayer garden, and the Adventist Historic Center, which opened in 2017.

With regard to scientific development, the Publications Secretariat and the UAP Secretariat for Science and Technology have been carrying out important work to promote research and publications. Thus, River Plate Adventist University Publishing is a member of the network of publishers of private universities and, until 2018, the number of its publications had surpassed 170 titles of books and several scholarly journals. Among them, the Journal Enfoques [Approaches], launched in 1976, continued as an academic publication of the UAP in 1992, and since 2001, the UAP participates in the publication of the journal Estudios en Educación [Studies in Education]. Likewise, the College of Theology launched a biannual biblical-theological journal called Davar Logos in 2002,47 and the UAP Center for Studies in Law and Religion has published the journal Derecho, Estado y Religión [Law, State and Religion] since 2017.

Medical care at this knowledge center is provided through a mobile health unit and is located close to the River Plate Adventist Sanitarium. Communication is facilitated by Student FM Radio 104.3, which turned 25 in 2018 and reaches a vast surrounding region. Also, food production has the brand “Ceapé” that produces breakfast cereals, soy products, grain, and bread.

Careers offered in the UAP are listed in part as: (a) Graduate School: Master’s in Theology, Doctorate in Theology; (b) the College of Theology: College Bible Instructor, Bachelor of Theology; (c) the College of Economic Sciences and Administration: Executive Assistant, Public Accountant, Degree in Management, in Systems Engineering; (d) the College of Health Sciences: Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Kinesiology and Physiatry, Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition, Medicine, Odontology; (e) the College of Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences: Social Communication, Bachelor’s in Social Communication, Bachelor’s in Psychology, College of Education Sciences, College of Physical Education, College of English, University Teaching Staff, Sworn Translation English-speaking Audience.

The Adventist Institute of River Plate (College level) offers: Biology, Music, and Arts Professorship, with a specialty in Music, Teachers of Initial Education, and Teachers of Primary Education. The Language School provides a Spanish course for newcomers. The Secretariat extension administers a pre-university course. The UAP participates in the Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA) plan, and academically, it has obtained the highest national accreditation of the medical career. It also obtained the highest accreditation at the national level of the master’s and doctorate degrees in Theology, being the only non-Catholic degrees accredited in the country.

In infrastructure, these are also noteworthy: (a) The inauguration of the University Temple, with capacity for 2,500 people.48 The new temple of the UAP was opened on May 18 and 19, 2012, with the presence of the president of the General Conference, Pastor Ted Wilson, and representatives of the South American Division and many other ecclesiastical fields. (B) The inauguration of the new building for the Faculty of Theology in 2013. (C) The inauguration of the Interdisciplinary Health Simulation Centre (CHS) of 600 m2 (the largest center in the country) in 2013. (d) The inauguration of the new breakfast cereal plant, with 500 m2 and a production capacity of 700 tons per month as well as the inauguration of the Mobile Health Unit and the creation of the Interdisciplinary Center for Health Science Practices. The UAP received the title of First “Healthy University” from the National Ministry of Health.49 Also, in this university arose and was developed the project "I Will Go" as a sign of the engagement of the students who are projected to the world, with impact at the level of the Argentina Union and South American Division, and finally, the creation of the project: "Adopt a Country.”50

Historical Role of the School

From 1909 to 1924, there was the so-called “Missionary Society”, with training meetings at the UAP. Its members moved to neighboring localities, distributed publications, gave Bible studies and evangelizing meetings, visited prisons, and preached in churches. The “Sociedad Misionera Pastoral” [Pastoral Missionary Society] (SMP) was organized in 1924, with practice meetings, special programs, and missionary outings to surrounding cities. The SMP led the spiritual and missionary life of the institution’s student body.

Within 1935 and 1972, there was the “Missionary Students Society” (SEM), which (since 1956) had a Publishing Department. In 1973, the “Misión Estudiantil del Plata” [River Plate Student Mission] (MEP) emerged, an organization that continues to be active. The model followed the pattern of Adventist missions around the world. MEP was the only missionary structure and included students from River Plate Adventist Higher Institute and the School of Nursing. The agency had a van, a bus and other minor vehicles for the transport of missionary teams, as well as a fully equipped inflatable tent with which important evangelizing campaigns were carried out (in 2010 a new tent was purchased, with inflatable structure).51

The regular work carried out every weekend in the towns of Entre Ríos and Santa Fe has brought dozens of people closer to the church each year and has trained hundreds of young people to be better missionaries.52 The choir was called Armonías del Paraná, then Armonías, and since 1976, the Musicap choir (created in 1973) has been the official choir,53 an important ambassador for the institution. There was a band in the 1930s, but it ended until the emergence of the current band in 1979. Musical activity has always had an important role, since choir activity is present in the early grades. The Mozart Children's Choir, founded in 1957, gathered students from the Domingo F. Sarmiento School. The bell choir began in 1991.

The creation of River Plate Adventist University, with four colleges, gave additional reasons for the emergence of new missionary groups, generally called institutes: The “Missionary Institute” of the College of Health Sciences, “I Am FACEA” of the College of Economic Sciences and Administration (FACEA), and “Mission of Faith” of the College of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.

A group of the College of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences students integrates the “Faith Mission” under the motto “Integration and Service,” among other initiatives. It maintains a picnic area in the town of Puiggari and runs a dynamic Sabbath School. “Yo soy FACEA” means the FACEA Institute of Missionary students, or it could be interpreted as “I am FACEA.” It arose in 2008 on the initiative of students with missionary concerns with the support of the dean of the College. They organized small groups in the UAP and, in the following years, fulfilled their mission in several localities. They also promoted a successful Sabbath School.

The College of Health Sciences “Instituto Misionero” [Missionary Institute] began in 2003 with the support of the dean. The first tasks were carried out in localities of Entre Rios. Missionary students organized radio and television programs, health hikes, quit smoking courses, and lifestyle tips. The impact program "Una sonrisa para..." [A smile for...], with health posts, and visits to institutions and neighborhoods, was made in several cities. Since 2008, trips were undertaken to Brazil for a project called “Impact Sao Paulo” in order to offer medical and evangelism in favelas (neighborhoods) for a week.

In 2010, a “Health Expo” was held for the first time with a tent and a carousel system to perform cardiac prognosis and teach the eight natural remedies. These exhibitions multiplied. Over time, activities have also diversified. Other groups, such as Jesus (Hope, Healing, and Salvation), organized in 2004, work within the IM to visit the sick in the SAP and the elderly in the local geriatrics communities. The Adventist Student Prison Ministry of River Plate carried out evangelizing service since 2006 with inmates of penal unit no. 6 of Paraná, where they founded a church. Since 2009, Rural Adventist Mission has visited families in rural areas, especially in Costa Grande, by bicycle. Thus, the “Missionary Institute,” has been working with more than 500 volunteers, including students, teachers, and community members.

Looking back and seeing that more than 120 years ago, men and women dreamed that, maybe, with a small school serving local young children in education would come to serve the Lord. Therefore, since its initial foundation, the UAP has been acting as a faithful missionary institution dedicated to the service of Education, and founded with faith and courage. These are values were passed on and should continue to be communicated as their pioneers did through much effort, sacrifice, and the fear of the Lord. They did this so that the UAP would not be only a center of knowledge, but a place where God has shown to be guiding the lives of everyone who has gone through this institution.

Chronology of Directors54

Colegio de Las Tunas (1899)

Director: Nelson Z. Town (1899)

Colegio Camarero [Camarero Academy] [Diamante Academy] (1900-1907)

Directors: Nelson Z. Town (1900-1901); Arturo Fulton (1902-1906).

Colegio Adventista del Plata [River Plate College] (1908-1990)

Directors: Roberto H. Habenicht (1907-1908); Walton C. John (1908-1912); Harland U. Stevens (1913-1919); Jess S. Marshall (1920-1934); Juan M. Howell (1934-1937); Jaime T. Thompson (1937); Ellis R. Maas (1938-1940); Tomas W. Steen (1941-1943); Fernando Chaij (1944-1946); Walton J. Brown (1947-1951); Héctor J. Peverini (1952-1955); Manuel F. Pérez (1956-1961); José Tabuenca (1962-1969); Egil H. Wensell (1970-1974); Manuel F. Pérez (1975); Egil H. Wensell (1976-1978); Isidoro A. Gerometta (1979-1982); Edwin I. Mayer (1983-1985); Emilio E. Vogel (1986-1989); Carlos Morales (1990).

River Plate Adventist University (1991-present)

Directors: Carlos Morales (1991-1993); Luis A. Schulz (1994-2004); Oscar Ramos (2005-2016); Horacio Rizzo (2016-present).55

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Plenc, Daniel Oscar, and Juan Carlos Priora. “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”]. River Plate Advenitst Library-University (Online), November 30, 2017.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”]. La Agenda [The Diary], weekly edition (November 30–December 7, 2017).

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “El Colegio de Las Tunas” [“Las Tunas College”]. Revista Adventista 116, no. 6 (June 2016).

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “La Universidad Adventista del Plata, los alemanes del Volga y las gallinas de Crespo” [“River Plate Adventist University, the Volga Germans and the Crespo hens”]. La Agenda [The Diary], (September 29 - October 5, 2011).

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “Posgrados en Teología de la UAP: a 25 años de sus comienzos” [“Graduate degrees in Theology of the UAP: 25 years from its beginnings”]. Revista Adventista, January 2005.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “Tiempos de Pioneros” [“Pioneer times”]. River Plate Adventist Library-University (Online), September 28, 2017.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. “UAP en misión: breve reseña de sus organismos misioneros” [“The UAP on mission: brief review of its missionary agencies”]. La Voz Institucional [The Institucional Voice] 2017, Edition I Will Go, 6-9.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. La formación teológica en la UAP. Una historia de excelencia y servicio: 1898-2018. [The Theological graduation in the UAP. A history of excellence and service: 1898 - 2018]. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2018.

Plenc, Daniel Oscar. Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: pioneers of Latin American Adventism]. Buenos Aires: South American Publishing House Association, 2008.

Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Portal]. https://www.adventistas.org/es.

Priora, Juan Carlos. Historia de la Universidad Adventista del Plata: Puerta a la excelencia y al servicio [River Plate Adventist University History: Door to excellence and service]. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2018.

“¿Qué se puede estudiar en el Colegio Adventista del Plata?” [What can you study at River Plate Adventist Academy?]. La voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], 1971.

Ramos, Oscar. Report received by Eugenio Di Dionisio on September 20, 2016.

Royal Spanish Academy. https://dle.rae.es/.

“Recibimos estudiantes, enviamos misioneros” [“We receive students and send missionaries”]. Revista Adventista, no. 11, November 2013.

Rojas, L. A. “Ecos del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist University Echoes”]. Revista Adventista, September 1909.

Rojas, L. A. “Ecos del Colegio Camarero” [“Echoes of the Camarero Academy”]. Revista Adventista, October 1905.

River Plate Adventist University Library. https://biblioteca.uap.edu.ar/.

Scholtus, Silvia C. “Robert H. Habenicht.” In Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano [Founding Missionaries of South American Adventism]. 3rd Ed. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio, and Sergio Becerra, 59-84. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2016.

Schulz, Víctor A. “Celebró sus 65 años el Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“Celebrated the 65th anniversary of River Plate Adventist Academy”]. Revista Adventista, January 1964.

“Segunda promoción del SALT” [“Second SALT Graduation”]. Revista Adventista, June 1988.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years. https://www.adventistyearbook.org/.

Steen, T. W. “El Colegio Adventista del Plata marcha adelante” [“River Plate Adventist Academy marches forward”]. Revista Adventista, January 1944.

Stevens, H. U. “Las instituciones - El Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“The Institutions - River Plate Adventist Academy”]. Revista Adventista, March 1916.

Tabuenca, José. “Sexagésimo quinto aniversario del CAP” [“Sixty-fifth anniversary of CAP”]. Revista Adventista, February 1964.

Thomann, E. W. “La dedicación del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“The dedication of River Plate Adventist University”]. Revista Adventista, April 1908.

Thomann, E. W. “Una visita al Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“A Visit to River Plate Adventist Academy”]. Revista Adventista, May 1915.

Town, N. Z., and F. H. Westphal. “Argentina.” General Conference Bulletin 4, no. 14 (April 18, 1901).

Town, Nelson Z. “Argentina.” ARH, February 27, 1900.

Town, Nelson Z. “Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”]. Revista Adventista, April 1908.

Town, Nelson Z. “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”]. Revista Adventista, December 1907.

Town, Nelson Z. “Las Tunas.” La Carta Mensual [Monthly Letter], August 1899.

Wensell, Egil H. “River Plate College Celebrate 75 Years of Service.” ARH, September 27, 1973.

Wensell, Egil H. El poder de una esperanza que educa y sana [The power of a hope that educates and heals]. Buenos Aires: South American Publishing House Association, 1993.

Westphal, F. H. “Our New School in Argentine.” The Missionary Magazine 12, no. 3 (March 1900).

Westphal, F. H. Pioneering in the Neglected Continent. Nashville, Tennessee: Southern Publishing Association, 1927.

Westphal, Francisco. Hasta el fin del mundo: liderando la Misión en Sudamérica [Until the end of the world: Leading the Mission in South America]. Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2017. Kindle Edition.

Westphal, J. W. “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”]. Revista Adventista, November 1906.

Westphal, J. W. “River Plate Junior College.” South American Bulletin 3, no. 5 (May 1927).

Notes

  1. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “River Plate Adventist University,” accessed March 18, 2020, http://bit.ly/36i4GaB.

  2. Biblioteca de la Universidad Adventista del Plata [River Plate Adventist University Library], “Nuestra Misión y Visión” [“Our Mission and Vision”], accessed March 24, 2010, https://bit.ly/3aiJpAp.

  3. Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “Historia de América del Sur” [“South America History”], accessed February 28, 2020, http://bit.ly/2ScYEEu.

  4. Daniel Oscar Plenc, Misioneros en Sudamérica: pioneros del adventismo en Latinoamérica [Missionaries in South America: pioneers of Latin American Adventism], Buenos Aires: South American Publishing House Association, 2008, 53-62; Héctor J. Peverini, En las huellas de la Providencia [In the footsteps of Providence], Buenos Aires, Argentina: South American Editor House Association, 1988, 113-123; Daniel Oscar Plenc, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], La Agenda [The Diary], weekly edition (November 30–December 7 2017): separate 1-2; Daniel Oscar Plenc, “El Colegio de Las Tunas” [“Las Tunas Academy”], Revista Adventista, 116, no. 6 (June 2016): 9.

  5. Francisco Westphal, Hasta el fin del mundo: liderando la Misión en Sudamérica [Until the end of the world: Leading the Mission in South America], Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Academy Publishing, 2017, Kindle Edition.

  6. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], Tatuí, SP: Casa Publicadora Brasileira, 2011, 59-60; Plenc and Priora, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UIr9tV; Peverini, En las huellas de la Providencia [], 113-123, 309-313.

  7. Westphal, Hasta el fin del mundo: liderando la Misión en Sudamérica [Until the end of the world: Leading the Mission in South America], 2017, Kindle Edition; Walton Brown, “Historia del Colegio Adventista del Plata 1898-1948” [“River Plate Adventist University History 1898-1948”], La Voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], (1948): 5-13, 32-36.

  8. Westphal, Hasta el fin del mundo: liderando la Misión en Sudamérica [Until the end of the world: Leading the Mission in South America], 2017, Kindle Edition.

  9. Ibid.

  10. “Colegio Adventista del Plata: su historia” [“River Plate Adventist Academy: its history”], La Voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], November 1937, 37-38, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UAGOLE.

  11. Walton J. Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America.” 4 vols. (Ph. D. Thesis, University of Southern California, California, 1953), 2: 347-348.

  12. Ibid; Daniel Oscar Plenc, “Tiempos de Pioneros” [“Pioneers Times”], River Plate University Library, September 28, 2017, accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/3do0ISz; Plenc and Priora, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UIr9tV.

  13. Westphal, Hasta el fin del mundo: liderando la Misión en Sudamérica [Until the end of the world: Leading the Mission in South America], 2017, Kindle Edition.

  14. A. T. De Learsy, “Argentine,” The Missionary Magazine 11, no. 8 (August 1899): 348, 349; Nelson Z. Town, “Las Tunas,” La Carta Mensual [Mensal Letter], (August 1899): 2; F. H. Westphal, “Our New School in Argentine,” The Missionary Magazine 12, no. 3 (March 1900): 124-127, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UCscv3; N. Z. Town, “Argentina,” ARH, February 27, 1900, 140, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/3bs99us; F. H. Westphal, Pioneering in the Neglected Continent (Nashville, Tennessee: Southern Publishing Association, 1927), 44-50; N. Z. Town and F. H. Westphal, “Argentina,” General Conference Bulletin 4, no. 14 (April 18, 1901): 325.

  15. E. W. Thomann, “La dedicación del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“The dedication of River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, April 1908, 27- 28; N. Z. Town, “Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, April 1908, 37; Lilliam Noel de John, “Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, August 1909, 15; L. A. Rojas, “Ecos del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Echoes”], Revista Adventista, September 1909, 15; Walton C. John, “El Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, February 1910, 15; Walton C. John, “El Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, April 1911, 14; Walton C. John, “Informe del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Report”], Revista Adventista, January 1912, 11-12; Walton C. John, “Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, July 1912, 12; E. W. Thomann, “Una visita al Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“A Visit to River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, May 1915, 11-12; H. U. Stevens, “Las instituciones - El Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“The Institutions - River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, March 1916, 20-21; J. M. Howell, “Notas del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Notes”], Revista Adventista, January 21, 1935, 11; J. M. Howell, “Del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“From River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, January 20, 1936, 9; J. M. Howell, “Notas del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Notes”], Revista Adventista, June 1936, 11; J. M. Howell, “Ecos del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Echoes”], Revista Adventista, June 7, 1937, 11, 13; Ellis R. Maas, “Notas del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy Notes”], Revista Adventista, July 24, 1939, 11.

  16. Rojas, “Ecos del Colegio Camarero” [“Echoes of the Camarero Academy”], 5, 6; Arturo Fulton, “El Colegio Camarero” [“The Camarero Academy”], Revista Adventista, March 1906, 4; Arturo Fulton, “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”], Revista Adventista, April 1906, 6-7, 10; J. W. Westphal, “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”], Revista Adventista, November 1906, 5; “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”], Revista Adventista, June 1907, 8; N. Z. Town, “Colegio Camarero” [“Camarero Academy”], Revista Adventista, December 1907, 6.

  17. Egil H. Wensell, “River Plate College Celebrate 75 Years of Service,” ARH, September 27, 1973, 1, 13, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Jfp8ji; Plenc, “Tiempos de Pioneros” [“Pioneers Times”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/3do0ISz.

  18. Silvia C. Scholtus, “Robert H. Habenicht,” en Misioneros fundacionales del adventismo sudamericano [in Founding Missionaries of South American Adventism], 3rd ed. Daniel O. Plenc, Silvia C. Scholtus, Eugenio Di Dionisio and Sergio Becerra, Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2016, 63; Plenc and Priora, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UIr9tV.

  19. Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America”, 361-362.

  20. ,2; Ibid., 369, 373; Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventist na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011, 114-115, 118.

  21. Egil H. Wensell, “River Plate College Celebrate 75 Years of Service,” ARH, September 27, 1973, 1, 13, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Jfp8ji.

  22. Brown, “A Historical Study of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Austral South America”, 373.

  23. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 115.

  24. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 249; For an overview of theological teaching in the institution, see: Daniel Oscar Plenc, La Formación Teológica en la UAP. Una historia de excelencia y servicio: 1898-2018 [The theological formation in UAP. A history of excellence and service: 1898-2018], 1st ed. (Libertador San Martin, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2018.

  25. J. W. Westphal, “River Plate Junior College,” South American Bulletin 3, no. 5, (May 1927): 3; Harvey A. Morrison, “South American Tour-IV,” ARH, November 23, 1944, 19.

  26. “Tambo” is a word of quechua origin, but in Argentina, according to the Spanish Royal Academy, “Tambo” means “livestock establishment intended for milking cows and the sale, generally wholesale, of their milk.” Real Academia Española [Royal Spanish Academy], “Tambo,” accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2QB5KkU.

  27. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 251.

  28. Daniel Oscar Plenc, “La Universidad Adventista del Plata, los alemanes del Volga y las gallinas de Crespo” [River Plate Adventist University, the Volga Germans and the Crespo hens], La Agenda [The Diary], (September 29-October 5, 2011): 1-2.

  29. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 371-372, 477-486; T. W. Steen, “El Colegio Adventista del Plata marcha adelante” [“River Plate Adventist Academy marches foward”], Revista Adventista, January 1944, 3.

  30. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 548.

  31. J. Brown, “El año cincuentenario del CAP” [“The 50th anniversary of CAP”], Revista Adventista,February 1949, 10-11.

  32. The Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet, in general, once a week to learn to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “are thrilled with outdoor activities. They like camping, hiking, climbing, exploring the woods and caves. [...] It is worth mentioning his knowledge of outdoor survival in places that are not easily accessible, know how to cook outdoors, light fire without matches, among others. Besides, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through drill commands and have their creativity awakened by manual arts. They also fight the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs.” Portal de la Iglesia Adventista del Séptimo Día [Seventh-day Adventist Church Website], “¿Quiénes son los Conquistadores?” [Who are the Pathfinders?], accessed February 20, 2020, http://bit.ly/2TpEBBY.

  33. Víctor A. Schulz, “Celebró sus 65 años el Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“Celebrated the 65th anniversary of River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, January 1964, 51; José Tabuenca, “Sexagésimo quinto aniversario del CAP” [“Sixty-fifth anniversary of CAP”], Revista Adventista, February 1964, 6-7.

  34. Greenleaf, Terra de esperança: o crescimento da Igreja Adventista na América do Sul [Land of Hope: the growth of Seventh-Day Adventist Church in South America], 548.

  35. Paul E. Moore, “Anniversary Celebration at River Plate College,” ARH, March 13, 1969, 20, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2xmjsRV.

  36. “¿Qué se puede estudiar en el Colegio Adventista del Plata?” [“What can you study at River Plate Adventist Academy?”], La voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], 1971, 17-19, accessed March 3, 2020,https://bit.ly/2xunLKT.

  37. Egil H. Wensell, “River Plate College Celebrates 75 Years of Service,” ARH, September 27, 1973, 1, 13, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Jfp8ji.

  38. Juan Carlos Olmedo, Notícias del Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Academy News”], Revista Adventista, no. 9 (September 1977): 15-16.

  39. Guillermo Durán, “Inauguración del Centro White” [“Inauguration of the White Center”], Revista Adventista, 79, no. 12 (December 1979): 14-15.

  40. Edwin I. Mayer, “Colegio Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist Academy”], Revista Adventista, January 1984, 23-25.

  41. Rolando A. Itin, “SALT - Primera colación de grados” [“SALT - First Graduation”], Revista Adventista, no. 4 (April 1984): 14.

  42. “Segunda promoción del SALT” [“Second SALT Graduation”], Revista Adventista, June 1988, 11; Daniel Oscar Plenc, “Posgrados en Teología de la UAP: a 25 años de sus comienzos” [“Graduate Degrees in Theology of UAP: 25 years from its beginning”], Revista Adventista, January 2005, 18.

  43. “Con 92 años de …” [“With 92 years of...”], La voz del Colegio [The Voice of the Academy], no. 67, 1990, 7, accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WQ1BgK.

  44. Juan Omar Finuchi, “Creación de la UAP” [“The UAP Creation”], Revista Adventista, no. 3 (March 1991): 11-13; Juan Omar Finuchi, “Autoridades de la flamante UAP” [“Authorities of the new UAP”], Revista Adventista, no. 6 (June 1991): 12; Juan Omar Finuchi, “Universidad” [“University”], Revista Adventista, no. 2 (February 1993): 24-25; Juan Omar Finuchi, “Universidad Adventista del Plata” [“River Plate Adventist University”], Revista Adventista, no. 7 (July 1993): 25-26; Egil H. Wensell, El poder de una esperanza que educa y sana [The power of hope, which educates and heals], Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 1993, 57-64, 75-135, 147-177, 187-198, 251-254, 265-274; Víctor Korniejczuk, “Noticias: Nuevos cursos de posgrado en el CAP” [“News: New Postgraduate courses in CAP”], Revista Adventista, February 1990, 14.

  45. Juan Carlos Priora, Historia de la Universidad Adventista del Plata: Puerta a la excelencia y al servicio [River Plate Adventist University History: Door to excellence and service], Libertador San Martín, Entre Ríos: River Plate Adventist University Publishing, 2018, particularly chapter 3.

  46. La Agenda [The Diary] of River Plate Adventist University, Weekly Edition, year 23, no. 35, 6-12 November 2013, 1-3.

  47. Plenc and Priora, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UIr9tV.

  48. “La UAP inauguró su nuevo templo” [“The UAP inaugurated its new temple”], Revista Adventista, June 2012, 23.

  49. Plenc and Priora, “Algunos hitos en la historia de la UAP” [“Some milestones in the history of the UAP”], accessed March 23, 2020, https://bit.ly/2UIr9tV.

  50. “Recibimos estudiantes, enviamos misioneros” [“We receive students and send missionaries”], Revista Adventista, no. 11 (November 2013): 16-17; Oscar Ramos, report received by Eugenio Di Dionisio, on September 20, 2016.

  51. Priora, Historia de la Universidad Adventista del Plata: Puerta a la excelencia y al servicio [River Plate Adventist University History: Door to excellence and service], 2018.

  52. Eugenio Di Dionisio, “La Misión Estudiantil del Plata y Misión Global” [“The River Plate Student Mission and Global Mission”], Revista Adventista, no. 12 (December1991): 22-23; Daniel Oscar Plenc, “UAP en misión: breve reseña de sus organismos misioneros” [“The UAP on mission: brief review of its missionary agencies”], La Voz Institucional 2017 [The Institutional Voice], Edition I Will Go, 6-9.

  53. Guillermo Durán, “Musicap canta en el Teatro Colón” [“Musicap sings at the CólonTheater”], Revista Adventista, no. 4 (April 1981): 17.

  54. Seventh-day Adventist Online Yearbook, “River Plate Adventist University,” accessed March 25, 2020, https://bit.ly/36i4GaB; “Argentine School,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: The General Conference Association of Seventh-Day Adventists, 1904), 83; “River Plate Adventist University,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 467-468. For more details about all the organization’s directorss, please refer to the Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks from 1904 to 2018. 

  55. You can find more information about River Plate Adventist University on their website at http://uap.edu.ar/ or in their social media on Facebook: @uapargentina, Instagram: @uapargentinahttps://www.instagram.com/uapargentina/, Twitter: @UAPArgentina, and YouTube: Universidad Adventista del Plata.

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Dionisio, Eugenio Di, Silvia C. Scholtus. "River Plate Adventist University." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6IH3.

Dionisio, Eugenio Di, Silvia C. Scholtus. "River Plate Adventist University." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. January 10, 2021. Date of access January 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6IH3.

Dionisio, Eugenio Di, Silvia C. Scholtus (2021, January 10). River Plate Adventist University. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved January 19, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=6IH3.