View All Photos

Brazilian Adventist College (Colégio Adventista Brasileiro ), CAB's entrance arch in the 1950s

Photo courtesy of Brazil National Center of Adventist History Archives.

Brazil Adventist University – São Paulo Campus

By Nevil Gorski, and Renato Ferreira Silva

×

Nevil Gorski

Renato Ferreira Silva

Brazil Adventist University – Sao Paulo Campus (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo or UNASP-SP) is an institution that offers early childhood education, elementary, high school, and higher education in a day and boarding school system. It belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil and is part of the Adventist world educational network. It operates in the missionary field of the Central Brazil Union Conference (União Central Brasileira or UCB), and is located on 5859 Itapecerica da Serra street, Zip Code 05858-001, Capão Redondo neighborhood, in the city of São Paulo, capital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

UNASP-SP offers higher education programs in Administration, Analysis and Development of Systems, Architecture and Urbanism, Computer Science, Biological Sciences (undergraduate and bachelor's degrees), Accounting Sciences, Startup Development and Management, Law, Physical Education (licentiate’s and bachelor's degrees), Nursing, Computer Engineering, Physiotherapy, Gastronomy, Information Technology Management, Psychology, Nutrition, Pedagogy, and Publicity and Advertising.1 UNASP-SP has an educational center on 1316 Eugênia de Carvalho street, Vila Matilde neighborhood, in São Paulo. This center offers Pedagogy and Administration courses, as well as postgraduate courses in Initial Reading Instruction and Literacy, Inclusive Education, Institutional and Clinical Psychopedagogy, and Education, Playfulness and Child Development.2

Currently, UNASP-SP has about 6,200 students, 493 of whom are boarding students. The entire student body is served by 607 workers, of whom 276 are teachers. UNASP-SP campus occupies an area of c. 288,425 m², with 80,000 m² of built area, forming the largest campus in the southern region of Grand São Paulo. Three libraries operate on the campus: one for the elementary school (Cordélia Denz Library), one for the high school (Mário Roque Library), and one for the schools of higher education (John Lipke Library).3 The UNASP-SP campus also has a cafeteria, two dorms (girls and boys), a church building, an auditorium, a Physical Activities and Sporting Practices Center, a sports complex with indoor courts, an Olympic pool and a gym, and an Adventist Art Academy, which offers free and technical courses in the fields of Music and Arts.4

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the University

The history of UNASP-SP begins with attempts to establish an Adventist missionary training school in Brazil. The first of these attempts took place in 1897 in the city of Gaspar Alto, in the state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. There, Guilherme Stein Jr., the first Adventist to be baptized in Brazil, founded a school that operated for about two years. At that time, pastor and teacher John Lipke, a German-American missionary who had studied at Battle Creek, the United States, served as director of the institution.5 After that school closed, Pastor Lipke started searching for a place where he could establish a new school and found a property in Taquari, in Rio Grande do Sul, in 1901. As it seemed to be a suitable place at that time, a new school was established there, with the same purpose of offering missionary training.6

While in operation, the school produced good results. However, the Adventist church leaders were still looking for a more suitable location to establish the school because the city of Taquari was in the extreme south of Brazil and the local conference could not afford to keep the school running.7 The school remained opened a few more years until it was closed in 1910 and the land in Taquari was sold. The church leaders searched for a more appropriate location in the states of Paraná, São Paulo, and Espírito Santo, where the majority of the Adventist members in the country lived.8

While the intensive search for the new school property was in progress, the church advanced in preaching the gospel around the city of São Paulo. In 1912, for example, an evangelist canvasser,9 Saturnino Mendes de Oliveira, started working in the Santo Amaro region (a current neighborhood in São Paulo), south of the capital. In that city, there were many German immigrants. Building on de Oliveira’s work, John Lipke conducted a series of evangelistic meetings in the city of Santo Amaro, two years later in 1914. Despite religious opposition in the city, several traditional families, including the Kleins and Teisens, were baptized at that time.10

In April 1915, Pastors John Lipke and John Boehm visited a rural property that belonged to the Teisen family to see whether it would be appropriate for the school for missionaries. The property was located on the current Itapecerica da Serra street, which connected the neighborhood of Capão Redondo, in the South Zone of São Paulo, to the cities of Santo Amaro and Itapecerica da Serra. The property had an area of 170 hectares and was about 9 kilometers away from Santo Amaro and 23 kilometers away from downtown São Paulo. As it was considered a suitable location, the property was purchased on April 28, 1915 for approximately US$ 7,00011, and was then registered. The payment for the land was made with the money received for the sale of the old school in Taquari and some donations.12

The University’s Establishment

May 6, 1915 is considered to be the official date when UNASP-SP was established, because on that day Pastor John Boehm, his wife Augusta,13 and six students settled in the property recently purchased from the Teisens. They quickly began to clear the land in order to start building small tents to house the students.14 The Boehms settled in a house that was already on the property. That house was later used as a classroom.15 The school's first name was Missionary College of Brazil Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists (Colégio Missionário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia), commonly referred to as Brazilian Seminary. The classes began on July 4 of the same year (1915), with 13 students and three teachers. Initially, as the school was opened with the primary goal of providing missionary training, the “Missionary Preparation” program was the only one offered at the school.16

That same year (1915), Professor Lipke became the first academic director of the school. However, Lipke continued to live in Santo Amaro, as he also served as pastor of the Adventist church in that city. Paulo Hennig was responsible for teaching and John Boehm became the first manager of the school, overseeing the construction work.17 The school was nestled amidst farms, ranches, and forests that provided wood for the construction work on the new school buildings as well as firewood and charcoal. Soon, first bricks were made for the walls of the new school buildings.18

First to be built was a dam, initially used for the school's water supply.19 On August 2, 1915, the cornerstone of the school's first building was laid. Initially, only the first floor was built. The building temporarily housed the principal’s office and another office in its central part as well as the male and female dorms. The kitchen and the cafeteria were in the basement.20

Soon, more students started arriving from different places and accommodating all students became a challenge. A temporary solution was to house some students in the tents that were used for church camp meetings. During the first school year, there were 17 students, 7 of whom were trained to sell books during school breaks. Their daily routine included, apart from studying, doing agricultural work or helping in some construction work.21

The University’s History

In 1916, the school received c. US$ 4,320 from the General Conference,22 which was fully used to build the campus. In that year, the number of students increased to 35, among whom 11 were trained to sell books during school breaks and 6 were trained as Bible instructors and were employed by the Adventist church.23

During the first years of its existence, the school was engaged in agricultural work and cattle raising. The first Holstein cows were purchased by the school management to provide milk for students and staff and additional income for the school. The students worked with the cattle. In 1917, the school dam was improved, making the school the main supplier of electricity for that region until the 1930s.24

At the beginning, all the school's leaders were foreigners, like Director John Lipke who was a German. Given that those were years around World War I, the presence of foreigners on the campus generated distrust in some local authorities towards the school. A São Paulo newspaper published an article hinting at the possibility that a German movement was in progress in the campus area and, as result, the school was surrounded and searched by a platoon of 130 Brazilian Army soldiers. When the suspicions were proved unfounded, the visit ended with a toast of grape juice offered to the unexpected visitors. Before leaving, the soldiers sang the Brazilian National Anthem together with the institution's teachers and students, showing respect for Brazil and its army.25

In 1917, Albertina Rodrigues da Silva was hired as a teacher and became the first Brazilian national to join the school's faculty. That school year ended with 55 students, some from countries such as Italy, the United States, and Spain. At that time, the institution's first library was already in operation, with about 200 volumes.26 In the following year (1918), two major changes took place. The school came to be officially called “Seminário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia” (Seminary of Brazil Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists; commonly referred to as Brazilian Seminary). Thomas W. Steen, an American pastor, became the school director and served until 1926.27 At the end of 1918, 29 students were employed by the church as Bible workers or canvassers.28

In 1918 and 1919, the world suffered from a flu pandemic called the “Spanish flu.” More than 50 million people died from this disease worldwide. In Brazil, there were more than 35,000 deaths.29 In 1919, a meeting of the Brazil Union Conference (presently Central Brazil Union Conference) was held on the school campus, and about 500 people attended. Some of the attendees were sick with the flu and transmitted the virus to some students and teachers. However, there were no deaths. The classes were suspended for only two days, and three weeks after the first recorded case, the situation normalized.30

The 1919 school year began with 87 students,31 among whom were students from the Brazilian states of São Paulo, Paraná, Santa Catarina, Espírito Santo, Bahia, Pernambuco, and Rio Grande do Sul and even some international students, showing how the school was becoming known in Brazil and beyond. At that time, the school year was divided into 2 semesters and classes were 45 minutes. The curriculum involved languages, geography, history, natural sciences, mathematics, music, grammar, among other subjects.32 In the area of languages, Portuguese and English were mandatory, while German and French were optional. All subjects required a pass rate of 75 percent and more. In 1919, the institution’s name was changed once again, and so it came to be known as “Seminário Adventista” (Adventist Seminary, commonly referred to as Brazilian Seminary).33

In 1920, the administration recognized the need for an elementary school to serve the children of the families who worked at the Brazilian Seminary. That year, there were 126 students, among whom were many boarding female students. The construction of a new female dorm began the same year, which was completed in that same decade. Also the same year, a study program was organized in the musical area, mainly with piano and organ classes. The inaugural class started with 39 students. Although there was still no official recognition by the Ministry of Education and Culture of Brazil, in the following year (1921), the following programs were opened: Preliminary, at primary level, lasting 4 years; Complementary, lasting 2 years; Normal or Commercial, at the secondary level, lasting 4 years; and Higher, for ministerial preparation, lasting 2 years.34

Other advances took place in 1921. Adventist Education became more known in Brazil. The Adventist education pioneers in Brazil were concerned with training students in different areas, such as preaching, teaching, administration and, when possible, musical knowledge. In 1921, the Brazilian Seminary had 10 teachers. The first issue of the newspaper called O Seminarista (The Seminarian) was published. That publication was created by the theology students. The students had opportunities to work on the campus and pay off part of their tuition.35

In 1922, the school held its first graduation ceremony and the graduating class had nine students (four women and five men) in the ministerial and educational programs.36 The following year, the school changed its name again and became known as “Colégio Adventista” (Adventist College, sometimes called Brazilian Seminary or Brazilian Training School). In 1923, three dairy cows and a pure-bred Dutch bull were imported from the United States. With the exhibition of these animals, the school received prizes in several dairy cattle competitions held in the state of São Paulo.37

In addition to these highlights, the campus infrastructure expansion plans also continued to be fulfilled. In 1924, the construction work on a two-story building with a basement began, which was inaugurated the following year. For many years, this building housed the principal’s room, treasury department, and library. It also had five classrooms and an auditorium with a capacity for 300 people, which was used on weekends for the campus church meetings. In the following year, the college started production of grape juice for the general public. This production was successful, and the brand was patented under the name “Excelsior.”38

In 1925, the first building exclusively dedicated to classrooms was completed.39 During that year, the school reached an enrollment of 233 students.40 In 1926, the campus area was recognized as a “model farm,” and became a reference in dairy farming in Brazil. In addition to these advances, the school gained even greater prominence in the region after 1932, when the “Excelsior” grape juice was presented to the public during an exhibition in Santo Amaro. Subsequently, the name of this juice was changed to “Superbom,”41 as it is still called today.42

Between 1937 and 1939, the requirements for the accreditation of the high school “Curso Ginasial” (Gymnasium) were completed. The high school program lasted five years and started with 44 students, aged between 14 and 30.43 In 1939, after 24 years of foreign leadership of the school, Professor Domingos Peixoto da Silva was elected as the first Brazilian national director of the college.44 Interestingly, after him, after the school directors were former students of the school. In 1939, during the school break, the construction work began on a new auditorium with a capacity for 400 people. The construction of this building was completed in 1940 when the college was again called “Seminário Adventista” (Adventist Seminary, known as Brazil Junior College). In the following year (1941), there was another change of the name, when the name “Colégio Adventista” (Adventist College, known as Brazil Junior College) was adopted again.45

During World War II, Brazil was the scene of a strong nationalist campaign that, in a way, influenced some changes in the school. One of them took place in 1942 when the school came to be known as “Colégio Adventista Brasileiro” (Brazilian Adventist College, known as Brazil College). 46 Later, other changes took place within Brazil College. The 1943 school year, for example, started with some academic changes, due to a reform in the teaching regulation in Brazil. One of them happened in the elementary school curriculum, which started to operate with a minimum period of four years. In addition, a high school program was created, lasting three years. From 1943 Brazil College started offering vocational courses, such as the Accounting, Normal [Teaching] and Secretarial courses. The traditional Missionary Preparation program continued to be offered as a free program.47

During the 1940s, a food industry was organized in the college, with the aim of producing other healthy options for sale to the public besides grape juice. A food factory would provide work opportunities to students to pay for their studies. In 1944, an arch-shaped entrance was built, where the institution’s name was written. This arch became a hallmark of Brazil College and still remains in the same place, but now under the name UNASP. The arch at Brazil College’s entrance was called “the door of opportunities” for a long time, and the school was promoted as a place where students could find opportunities to study, work and grow in life. In 1945, the number of enrollments reached a new record: 496 students.48

In 1946, a building was constructed to be used as a Nursing Technical School. However, the nursing program could not be offered at that time and, eventually, the building started to house the Elementary School Course.49 Almost a decade later, in 1955, the institution reached the number of 636 students enrolled and, from that year, the Theology program began to require from its entrant students a high school education certificate. Thus, the theology program became a higher education program50 and lasted four years.51 While pursuing academic growth, the institution’s priority continued to be the spiritual growth of its teachers and students. About 500 students were baptized between 1930 and the late 1940s.52

The second half of the 1950s and the beginning of the 1960s were marked by the structural expansion of the college. On April 3, 1956, for example, a building was inaugurated for the teaching of music. This area of study was highly sought after by students and, by the time the building was opened, there were already 126 students enrolled for several instrumental classes. After a few years, this building gradually became the headquarters of the Adventist Musical Conservatory (Conservatório Musical Adventista) (presently named Academia Adventista de Arte [Arts Adventist Academy]).53 On August 5, 1956, the new campus cafeteria was inaugurated, with a capacity for 600 people. In the following year, the cafeteria and the female dorm were expanded, and a laundry room was built.54 These buildings are preserved to this day, although with some changes. In 1961, Brazil College had its name changed once again, becoming “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” (IAE) (Adventist Teaching Institute; however, in English, it continued to be called Brazil College). Although the change took place, the old name was still used to identify the institution's elementary education.55

In the early 1960s, plans were made to divert vehicle traffic away from the central part of the campus (where the main buildings were located). The construction work on the campus church building also started. Until then, the college's auditorium was used as a church. However, due to the growing number of Adventist members, the auditorium was no longer able to host all of them. Thus, in 1961, the IAE management decided to construct a building in the available spot close to the school entrance. However, considering the importance of that undertaking, the South American Division (which administered the college) recommended that the institution should study the possibility to build the church in the central part of the campus.56

A new male dorm began to be built in 1962. At that time, Adventist work rapidly expanded throughout Brazil and, the church’s growth in membership, there were already 974 students enrolled at the college in 1964.57 In 1965, the IAE celebrated its 50th anniversary. At that time, the college’s elementary education, high school education, and commercial courses were approved by the Brazilian Ministry of Education, in addition to the higher education program in Theology. In 1966, a road around the campus.58

During the following years, in the academic area, the institution began implementing higher education programs, starting with the health programs, because one of the greatest Adventist missionary principles had always been the preaching of the gospel combined with the health message. The approval of the Nursing program and of the Faculdade Adventista de Enfermagem [Adventist School of Nursing] (FAE) took place on May 31, 1968, by Federal Decree nº 62.800.59 The classes started in February of the following year, with 27 students.60 At that time, Maria Kudzielicz, a nurse, was voted by the IAE board to be the first director. However, Kudzielicz was taking a post-graduate program at the Universidade de São Paulo [University of São Paulo] (USP) and, therefore, Professor Filomena Spera became the first director of the Nursing School.61

The IAE Nursing program was the first Adventist higher education program to be officially recognized by the government of Brazil.62 A new building for FAE was built.63 This new construction was carried out with financial contributions from a German support agency for developing countries,64 with a donation from the World Council of Churches, headquartered in London, and with a budgetary allocation from the Brazilian Ministry of Education and Culture. In addition to classrooms, biochemistry, anatomy, dietetics, and nursing laboratories were built.65

In the early 1970s, the college opened new undergraduate programs. The Pedagogy program was approved by the Brazilian Ministry of Education on August 14, 1973. Professor Hampton E. Walker was the first director of the Faculdade Adventista de Educação (FAEd) (Education Adventist College). That same year, the South American Division requested the IAE to develop a 10-year strategic plan and, for the first time, reference was made to the possibility of opening an Adventist university in Brazil.66 In that context, the Adventist Church continued to expand throughout the national territory, on several missionary fronts, thus creating an increasing need for well-prepared workers to meet these new demands.67

In 1975, the IAE surpassed the mark of 2,000 students, of whom 520 were boarding students. To celebrate that large enrollment, a thanksgiving service was held in the campus church, which at the time was still under construction and had nothing but the roof. On February 15, 1976, the Arts Adventist Academy was officially created, which replaced the Adventist Musical Conservatory. That year, the IAE had 2,230 students.68

The General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists decided to dedicate the worldwide 13th Sabbath offering of the 2nd quarter of 1974 to Brazil College. These funds were used to build a three-story classroom building for the Faculdade Adventista de Teologia (FAT) (Adventist School of Theology) and the Centro de Pesquisas Ellen G. White (Ellen G. White Research Center). The building was built in 180 days, being inaugurated in 1978.69 On June 24, 1979, the South American Division created the “Seminário Adventista Latino-Americano de Teologia” (SALT) (Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary), and FAT was linked to it, as the seat of the theological seminary for Brazil. Classes for the first group of students of the new SALT started two years later.70

The year 1979 was considered quite difficult for the school. On May 11 of that year, the city of São Paulo issued Decree 15.887, which made official the expropriation of a big part of the IAE's land that was to be transformed into a large housing project. There was already a previous decree, declaring that the land was subject to expropriation. However, before the decree could be executed, the Adventist legal representatives reached an agreement with the city government so that educational buildings were not included in the expropriation. Thus, when the project was implemented, only 30 hectares remained of the original 170 hectares remained in the school’s possession. These 30 hectares included the center of the property, where the main buildings were.71

In September 1983, the São Paulo City Hall paid approximately US$ 4.3 million to the Church and the IAE.72 This amount was used almost entirely to pay for a new property in the Limeira region, São Paulo countryside. The purchase of Lagoa Bonita Farm, then located in the city of Artur Nogueira, São Paulo countryside, was made on September 13, 1983. This 650-hectare property is currently located in the city of Engenheiro Coelho and houses UNASP Engenheiro Coelho campus. After the purchase of this area, the remaining amount was used in the upcoming years for the construction of the first buildings on the new campus, which would especially serve higher education students.73

On June 16, 1984, IAE’s church building was inaugurated on the São Paulo campus, with a capacity for 1,500 people.74 A year later, due to economic problems in Brazil, student enrollment decreased to 1,838 students. However, the college continued to expand, and from October 16, 1986, it began to host the Brazil National Center of Adventist History (Centro Nacional da Memória Adventista), which was created by the South American Division to gather historical materials pertaining to the Adventist history in Brazil. Since its creation, this center has been under the responsibility of the Ellen G. White Research Center.75

In the late 1980s, the school leadership decided to open new programs, with the aim of preparing Adventist youth to work in different areas of knowledge. On May 10, 1988, the Language Studies program began to be offered, officially authorized by the Brazilian Ministry of Education.76 The same year, on December 22, the Short Degree in Science and Mathematics was approved. Around that time, the IAE’s leaders decided that Science and Health programs should remain in São Paulo, while the Theology and Pedagogy programs should be transferred to the new campus, the UNASP Engenheiro Coelho campus. The decision was made taking into account the need for laboratories and nearby places for the students’ internship.77

On February 29, 1989, the building of Escola Modelo Professor Orlando R. Ritter (Professor Orlando R. Ritter Training School) was inaugurated on the São Paulo campus.78 The purpose of this school was to serve as a training center for students of the Pedagogy program. Two years later, the new educational campus established at Lagoa Bonita Farm, the UNASP Engenheiro Coelho campus, was ready to receive the first groups of students. The transfer was made gradually, starting with FAT's first and second grade classes. And the following year (1992), the same was done with FAEd, which started to be based on the new campus, then called “Novo IAE” (New IAE).79

In 1992, the former male dorm at the IAE in São Paulo, which had already been closed, underwent a major renovation and was adapted for the IAE's administrative offices. The end of the year was celebrated with the graduation of the 70th class of Theology at the IAE. The first class had graduated in 1922, and since that year, FAT had helped to train a total of 1,568 students, with an annual average of 24 students. On November 1, 1993, the Brazilian Ministry of Education approved the operation of the Biological Sciences and Mathematics programs.80 Less than a month later, on November 31, the IAE was officially recognized by the Brazilian Ministry of Education as a Bicampi Education Institution. The oldest campus continued operating in São Paulo and the new campus in Artur Nogueira.81

In January 1994, the IAE, as a benchmark of Adventist education of that time, hosted the 1st Adventist National Nursing Meeting. Since then, the campus has been holding congresses and meetings to serve the needs of the Church, especially in the areas of Education, Health and Family. Congresses on creationism have also been held since the IAE and its professors were pioneers in debating and teaching this topic from a scientific point.82 In February 1994, the transfer of the Language Studies program to the New IAE campus started. With the transfer of FAEd to the new campus, the Adventist administrators in the country’s capital requested that the Pedagogy program continued to be offered at the São Paulo campus, in order to facilitate the training of teachers for denominational schools in the region. In response to this request, the IAE reopened the Pedagogy program on São Paulo campus.83

In 1997, the South American Division Evaluation Committee recommended that the IAE oversees the management of the two campuses. On February 2, 1998, Professor Nevil Gorski was elected the first rector of the IAE, starting to head the two campuses.84 On June 6 of the same year, the Centro de Atividades Físicas e Práticas Esportivas CENAPE) (Physical Activities and Sporting Practices Center) was inaugurated on the São Paulo campus. This center included a covered multi-sport gym, a fitness center, a heated semi-Olympic pool, and a racetrack, as well as open fields for soccer, volleyball, basketball, and tennis games.85 On the same date, the Brazilian Ministry of Education formally approved the Physiotherapy and Nutrition programs on the São Paulo campus. On January 14, 1999, the new Pedagogy program was made official on that campus.86

On September 9, 1999, the IAE was recognized as a University Center by means of a Federal Decree of the Government of Brazil, being renamed “Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo” (São Paulo Adventist University Center, known as Brazil Adventist University).87 The first acronym adopted was “CEUASP.” However, after some consideration, the acronym was redefined as “UNASP.” Thereafter, the institution was officially composed of São Paulo campus (UNASP-SP) and Engenheiro Coelho campus (UNASP-EC). According to the government decree, the IAE became the UNASP’s maintainer institution.88 On December 12, 1999, the IAE council confirmed Nevil Gorski as the IAE’s first rector,89 Euler P. Bahia as director of UNASP-SP and Daniel Baía as director of UNASP-EC.90

In 2000, UNASP-SP had 3,348 students, with 1,424 students in higher education and 1,924 students in elementary and high school education. On August 14, 2000, the Administration program was opened,91 and on April 18, 2001, the Clínica de Fisioterapia do UNASP (UNASP Physiotherapy Clinic), presently known as Policlínica Universitária Dr. Gideon de Oliveira (Dr. Gideon de Oliveira University Polyclinic) was inaugurated, with the aim of offering natural physiotherapy treatments.92 Sometime later, the curricular internships of UNASP-SP students in the areas of Nursing, Nutrition, Physiotherapy, Psychology and Physical education started to be carried out in this clinic.93

On April 27, 2001, UNASP signed an agreement with the government of the state of São Paulo to establish and manage two restaurants of the Bom Prato chain – one located in the Santo Amaro neighborhood and the other one in Grajaú neighborhood. These restaurants offer lunch based on 1,200 calories, for the popular price of R$ 1.00 (approximately US$ 0.20), in highly populated places. These restaurants offered 2,300 meals in Santo Amaro and 1,500 meals in Grajaú daily.94

In 2003, the Psychology program began operating, and in 2004, the Brazilian Ministry of Education authorized the Computer Science and Physical Education programs. Later, on May 6, 2005, during the celebration of the 90th anniversary of UNASP, a new library was inaugurated on the UNASP-SP campus. At the time, the library had 90 thousand copies available to 4,699 students and the community. Two years later, in February 2007, the System Analysis and Development program was opened. Around that time, the Accounting program also started to be offered. On June 2, 2007, a new five-story building was opened that had a library, 38 classrooms for higher education, a computer lab, and offices for program coordinators.95

In 2010, enrollments in UNASP-SP reached a total of 4,577 students, of whom 3,019 were students in higher education and 1,558 in elementary and high school education. In 2012, the bachelor’s degree in Physical Education96 and the degree in Architecture and Urbanism were authorized.97 In the following year (2013), as a milestone in the development of the school at the graduate level, the Brazilian Ministry of Education approved the master's course in Health Promotion. On November 4 of the same year, the community benefited from the inauguration of the Southern Unit of the Hospital Adventista de São Paulo (HASP) (São Paulo Adventist Hospital), which was established near the main entrance of the school.98

In 2015, many other inaugurations took place, which were encouraged by UNASP’s centenary celebrations. Pioneers and benefactors of the institution were honored by giving their names to special places on the campus, such as “Praça Milton Soldani Afonso” [Milton Soldani Afonso Square], “Avenida Jerônimo G. Garcia” [Jerônimo G. Garcia Avenue], “Edifício Professora Cordélia Denz” [Professor Cordélia Denz Building] and “Auditório Lóide Simon” [Lóide Simon Auditorium].99 Furthermore, John Lipke’s and John Boehm’s busts were placed in the central square. The musical “Muito Além” (Far beyond) was held to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the College. The choirs and the orchestra of UNASP-SP participated in the program. That year, the campus reached the mark of 5,998 students, 597 employees, and 283 teachers. In addition to the celebration of the 100th anniversary, another highlight in 2015 was the beginning of the opening of the Computer Engineering program, which was authorized by the Brazilian Ministry of Education in 2014.100

In 2017, three new UNASP-SP graduation extension hubs were inaugurated. They are located in the Adventist academies of Liberdade, Campo Limpo, and Vila Matilde, all in the city of São Paulo. The plan was to offer the Pedagogy, Administration, and Nursing programs in these places. However, Vila Matilde Adventist Academy (Colégio Adventista de Vila Matilde) is the only center in operation so far, where Pedagogy and Administration courses are held at night.101 In 2018, new courses were opened at UNASP: Law, Gastronomy, Development and Management of Startups, and Information Technology Management. The latter three are training courses for technologists.102 More recently, in 2019, during the celebration of the 104th anniversary of UNASP, the Centro de Memória Roberto César de Azevedo [Roberto César de Azevedo History Center] was inaugurated, which aims to gather historical material on more than 100 years of UNASP's existence.103

The University’s Historical Role

At the inauguration of the school, in 1915, John Boehm said a prayer in which he asked God to bless that humble beginning and that the college would enlighten the whole country like a lighthouse from the top of the hill.104 This prayer was answered and the institution has been a light not only for the Capão Redondo region but for São Paulo, Brazil, and the world, bringing educational and social development to many places and many people at the local, regional levels and far beyond.

At the local level, UNASP-SP was the first private educational institution to be established.105 After its establishment, some families started to live near the school.106 At the time, the rural area where the institution was founded was very isolated. However, the presence of the school favorably influenced the urbanization of the place, as was the case with the Itapecerica da Serra road, which became better conserved. In November 1930, a contract was signed between Santo Amaro city hall and the school in order to pave eight kilometers of Itapecerica da Serra road. Drainage works were carried out and the entire area was covered with gravel. Years later, in 1934, a bus line was created between Santo Amaro and Itapecerica da Serra, passing by the campus. Besides, a postal mail sub-agency was established at the school.107 All of these improvements were driven by the College.108

Since the establishment of the school, its influence has also been noticeable at the regional level. In 1923, two students who had graduated from the Brazilian Seminary started two parish schools – one in Liberdade neighborhood, in São Paulo, and another in the city of Santo André. It is also known that the first UNASP-SP student-canvassers worked in the countryside of the state of São Paulo and opened the way for new Adventist congregations to be established. During the 1930s, several congregations in São Paulo were founded through the ministry of theology students and professors. In 1936, in the city of São Paulo alone, there were 709 Adventists spread across 9 churches: Central, Brás, Church of the Germans, Pinheiros, Church of the Hungarians, São Caetano, Vila Matilde, Vila Mangalot, and Eldorado. All of these congregations were established as a result of the school's mission work.

The school’s impact extended beyond São Paulo. Many of the school’s graduates implanted the same agricultural system they saw on the campus in several other Adventist schools throughout Brazil.109 Others contributed to the work overseas. Theology graduates were sent as missionaries to countries like France, Portugal, and Angola, and to mission fields in South America. While helping other countries, the institution remained attentive to the needs of Adventists in Brazil. In 1940, for example, a Nursing program under the supervision of the Red Cross was implemented at CAB. That program aimed, in addition to the emphasis on a healthy lifestyle, to prepare young people for the imminent possibility of Brazil's entry into World War II. In this way, the college was providing students with an alternative way of services, similar to what had already been done by the Adventist church in the United States in the previous decade.110

Currently, UNASP continues to fulfill its missionary role by serving the communities of São Paulo in various ways. Since 2001, the campus has hosted a Community Telecentre, where a digital literacy project for the visually impaired works. Other social inclusion projects carried out in this telecentre include the elderly and the deaf. Dozens of people are learning new forms of communication and are trained for the job market. The center thus helps alleviate potential isolation and the lack of job prospects of many people by helping them master new digital technologies. In 2002, a partnership was initiated with the city of São Paulo, through which UNASP coordinates the Family Health Program (Programa de Saúde da Família)111 in the district of Capão Redondo.112 More than 300,000 people were served by 75 teams of this program,113 most of them in the school surroundings. By 2014, more than 6 million health procedures had been performed under the administration of UNASP.114 Another activity developed by the college with the community is the Health Fair (Feira de Saúde),115 which offers guidance on disease prevention and health promotion. On some occasions, the biology students teach the Health Fair participants how to build vertical gardens.116

The musical life of UNASP-SP has stood out for its excellence. There are many projects conducted by the Arts Adventist Academy and its teachers. The Academy maintains several musical groups, such as Jovem Coral [Youth Choir], Coral Carlos Gomes [Carlos Gomes Choir], and Orquestra Sinfônica Jovem [Youth Symphony Orchestra], in addition to free instrument classes and the technical course in Music.117 Since its establishment, the Carlos Gomes Choir, which was the first Adventist choir to perform with the São Paulo State Symphony Orchestra, has been a reference for Adventist musicians and vocal groups throughout Brazil.118

The missionary vocation of UNASP-SP remains strong. The Capão Redondo region, where the campus is located, has the largest concentration of Adventists in the world.119 There are many congregations and many of them have been established under the direct or indirect influence of UNASP. The Alvorada Church, built in 1940 next to the school, is currently operating with a membership of approximately 2,000 people. Another well-known Adventist church in the region is Capão Redondo Church, which holds three services per Sabbath, serving nearly 3,000 members. Other congregations, such as Jardim Lilah, Santo Eduardo, and Jardim Colombo, were also established due to the direct influence of the presence and evangelistic work of UNASP-SP, the oldest boarding school in Brazil.120

What Remains to be Done to Fulfill the University’s Mission

UNASP-SP is the only Adventist higher education institution located in the urban perimeter of the city of São Paulo. It is established in the largest city in the southern hemisphere, in a region with approximately 1.5 million inhabitants, most of whom are low-income and exposed to a high crime rate. In this context, the school with its mission of “preaching and teaching” is constantly challenged to make a difference in the local environment. One of the goals of UNASP-SP is to innovate the methods of evangelization, while maintaining the message of truth, in order to accommodate the growing needs of the world.121 The “Centros de Influências” [Centers of Influence]122 has been one of the evangelistic methods used by UNASP-SP.123 Furthermore, UNASP-SP intends to maintain and expand projects such as “O Amor é Capaz” [Love is Able], in which groups of young people go out on Thursdays, after school, to take food to hundreds of people in the risk areas. UNASP-SP also promotes the “Projeto Integração” [Integration Project], in which more than 170 people dedicate time to organize moments of communion with God on the campus. Organized in groups, these volunteers coordinate services and programs in several sectors of the campus. Through the activities of this project, about 40 moments of prayer and meditation took place daily in the entire area of the school, with more than 2,000 people involved, with young people praying for young people. Another project to be carried on is “Geração 148” [Generation 148],124 through which young people are encouraged to do missionary work in the territory beyond the campus.125

UNASP-SP continues to support initiatives for blood donation. Currently, the project is developed weekly and gathers volunteers to ensure blood supply for several blood centers in the city of São Paulo. More than 14,000 blood donations have been made in recent years, making UNASP one of the largest voluntary blood collection centers in Brazil. Thus, lives are saved by this act of love.126 The campus will also continue to engage in several projects of the South American Division, such as Impacto Esperança [Hope Impact].127 In this way, it will also continue to help the Church to spread the message of the crucified and resurrected Savior, who is about to come.128

There is another work developed by UNASP-SP that will be emphasized in the coming years – “Change Your World,”129 which is a cross-cultural mission project. Up to the present day, it has prepared and sent 1,500 volunteers to participate in short-term missionary projects around the world. There are already more than 53 evangelization points in Brazil and 15 in other countries. The project is already recognized by the world Church as one of the most significant projects, as it awakes the postmodern mind of the young Adventist to the fact that it is possible to dedicate time and resources to evangelize and save people for the kingdom of God.130

UNASP-SP carries in its history a strong sense of mission and faith in God’s leading. The pioneers longed to preach the gospel to the world and, in order to do that, they built the school to offer missionary training. The school has been training people for the Adventist mission work for more than a century. Through the work done, the Adventist message has been planted in the hearts of thousands of students who have passed through the campus. Missionaries were sent from this campus to bring the good news of hope and salvation in Christ to Brazil and the world. The leadership, students, and workers are firmly confident that the hand of God will continue to guide the institution.131

The School Names and Directors132

Missionary College of Brazil Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists, known as Brazilian Seminary (1915-1918) (Colégio Missionário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia, known as Seminário Adventista): John Lipke (1915-1917); Thomas Steen (1918-1927).

Seminary of Brazil Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists, known as Brazilian Seminary (1918-1919) (Seminário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia (commonly referred to Seminário Adventista): Thomas Steen (1918-1927).

Adventist Seminary, known as Brazilian Seminary (1919-1923) (Seminário Adventista (also called Seminário Adventista do Brasil): Thomas Steen (1918-1927).

Adventist College (sometimes called Brazilian Seminary and other times, Brazilian Training School) (1923-1940) (Colégio Adventista): Thomas Steen (1918-1927); George B. Taylor (1928-1931); Ellis R. Maas (1932-1937); Lloyd E. Downs (1937-1938); Domingos Peixoto da Silva (1939-1940).

Adventist Seminary, known as Brazil Junior College (1940) (Seminário Adventista; sometimes called Colégio Adventista): Domingos Peixoto da Silva.

Adventist College, known as Brazil Junior College (1941) (Colégio Adventista or Colégio Adventista Brasileiro): Domingos Peixoto da Silva.

Brazilian Adventist College, commonly referred to as Brazil College (1942-1961) (Colégio Adventista Brasileiro): Domingos Peixoto da Silva (1942-1947); Dario Garcia (1948-1949); Jerônimo Granero Garcia (1950-1953); Rodolpho Belz (1954-1957); Dario Garcia (1958-1960); Jairo Tavares de Araújo (1961-1966).

Brazil College (1961-1999) (Instituto Adventista de Ensino): Jairo Tavares de Araújo (1961-1966); Nevil Gorski (1967-1975); Oly Ferreira Pinto (1976-1978); Walter Boger (1979-1984); Roberto César de Azevedo (1985-1990); Nevil Gorski (1990-1998); Euler Pereira Bahia (1999-2003).

Adventist University Center, São Paulo campus, known as Brazil Adventist University (1999-Present) (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo, São Paulo campus São Paulo or UNASP-SP): Euler Pereira Bahia (1999-2003); André Marcos Pasini (2004-2007); Helio Carnassale (2007-2015); Douglas Menslin (2015-Present).133

Sources

Annoroso, Aira. “Unasp oferece oportunidades de crescimento por meio do voluntariado” [Unasp provides opportunities for growth through volunteering]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), August 28, 2019.

Annoroso, Aira. “UNASP-SP promove abertura oficial das atividades acadêmicas em 2020” [UNASP-SP promotes official opening of academic activities in 2020]. UNASP (Online), January 20, 2020.

Annual Statistical Reports. Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1917.

Associação Paulista Para o Desenvolvimento da Medicina [São Paulo Association for the Development of Medicine]. https://www.spdm.org.br/.

“Aula Magna do Governador” [Governor's Master Class]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1259, year 108, April 2013.

Azevedo, Idia Almeida de (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP). E-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

Azevedo, Roberto C. “O Último Decreto” [The Last Decree]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September 1983).

Bleck, Gunther H. “Novas da Colina IAENSE” [News from IAENSE Hill]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 64 (June 1969).

Boehm, John. “A Training School in Brazil.” Missions Quarterly 5, no. 2 (second quarter of 1916).

Borges, Michelson. “Epopéia do Ensino Superior” [Higher Education Epic]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 98 (June 2003).

Borges, Michelson. “Parceria que alimenta” [Partnership that feeds]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 97 (June 2001).

Borges, Michelson. “Presente de Aniversário” [Birthday gift]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 96 (April 2000).

“Congresso Indica Marcos da Enfermagem” [Congress indicates milestones of Nursing]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 90, March 1994.

Cidade de São Paulo [City of São Paulo]. http://www.capital.sp.gov.br/.

“Dê um Salto para o Futuro!!!” [Take a Leap into the Future!!!]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 90, January 1994.

Doehnert, E. R. A Vida de Emílio Doehnert [The life of Emílio Doehnert]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1997.

Ebling, José Carlos Juliano. “Instituto Adventista de Ensino (Brazil College): It’s Foundation and Development.” Term Paper, Andrews University, 1974.

“Educação Completa” [Complete Education]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 94, August 1998.

“Escola Modelo” [Training School]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 85, April 1989.

Gorski, Nevil. “IAE, uma luz para o Brasil” [IAE, a light for Brazil]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 95 (October 1999).

Gross, Augusto. “Lançamento da Primeira Pedra do Edifício da Escola Missionaria” [Laying of the first stone of the missionary school’s building]. Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 9 (September 1915).

Gross, Renato. “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education]. In Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History]. Edited by Alberto Timm. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Guarda, Márcio Dias. “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015).

Guerra, Juvêncio and Jurandyr Guerra. Instrução particular: Associação dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia no Brasil. Colégio Adventista Brasileiro em 1932 [Private instruction: Seventh-day Adventists Association in Brazil. Brazil College in 1932]. Santo Amaro, SP: Rossolillo Printing Office, 1932.

Hosokawa, Elder. “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea]. Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001.

Hothon, Mairon. “Centro de Memória do Unasp é inaugurado na capital paulista” [Unasp History Center is inaugurated in São Paulo]. UNASP (Online), May 20, 2019.

“IAE poderá oferecer curso de Letras ainda em 88” [IAE will be able to offer Language Studies course in 88]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 84, March 1988.

Kuntze, Tânia Denise. “Faculdade Adventista de Enfermagem: Memória Histórica - 1968-1998” [Adventist School of Nursing: Historical Memory - 1968-1998]. Doctoral thesis, University of São Paulo, 2010.

Lipke, John. “Our Need of a Training School.” Missions Quarterly 5, no. 2 (second quarter of 1916).

“Mais Brilho na Colina” [A Greater Light On The Hill]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 79, July 1984.

Missão Urbana [Urban Mission]. https://missaourbana.org/.

“Notícias 83” [News 83]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 78, August 1983.

Nunes, Adilson Carlos. “Instituto Adventista de Ensino - Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College - Its Establishment and Development]. Monograph, Brazil College, 1986.

“Para Preservar a História” [To Preserve History]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 83, May 1987.

Pasini, André M. “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development]. In Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History]. Edited by Alberto R. Timm. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999.

Passos, Stephanie. “Igreja Adventista do Capão Redondo ganhará novo endereço em 2020” [Capão Redondo Adventist Church will gain new address in 2020]. Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News] (Online), November 14, 2018.

Pereira, Murilo. “Acesso ao ensino superior” [Access to higher education]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] (Online), December 20, 2018.

Pereira, Murilo. “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo inaugura nova unidade no Unasp SP” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital inaugurates new unit at Unasp SP]. UNASP (Online), November 4, 2013.

Rabello, João. John Boehm: Educador Pioneiro [John Boehm: Pioneer Educator]. São Paulo, SP: CNMA, 1991.

Santos, Luís Henrique dos; editor. UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP - Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)]. Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015.

Sella, Luiz Fernando and Daniela Tiemi Kanno. Manual da Feira de Saúde [Health Fair Manual]. South American Division, 2015.

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website. https://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Silva, Guilherme. “Tijolos do conhecimento” [The Bricks of The Knowledge]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 97 (June 2001).

Siqueira, J. N. “Novas da Colina IAENSE” [News from IAENSE Hill]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 60 (August 1965).

“Solenidade encerra Semana da Comunidade Adventista” [Solemnity ends Adventist Community Week]. Câmara Municipal de São Paulo [São Paulo City Council] (Online), October 31, 2016.

Souza, Lucio Pereira de. “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” [Brazil College]. Monograph, Brazil College, 1986.

Stencel, Renato, and William Edward Timm. “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist Faculty of Theology in Brazil]. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Brazil National Center of Adventist History, 2015.

Storch, Gustavo S. “Como Foi Fundado o Seminário Adventista” [How Adventist Seminary was established]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 66 (May 1971).

Superbom. https://www.superbom.com.br/.

Taschner, Natalia Pasternak. “Gripe espanhola: 100 anos da mãe das pandemias” [Spanish flu: 100 years of the mother of pandemics]. Veja Saúde [Veja Health magazine] (Online), March 11, 2020.

Timm, Alberto; editor. A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles]. Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004.

Tonetti, Márcio. “Culto de gratidão celebra os cem anos do UNASP” [Thanksgiving worship service celebrates 100 years of UNASP]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] (Online), May 11, 2015.

Tonetti, Márcio. “Maestro incansável” [Tireless conductor]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] (Online), May 7, 2019.

“Três Quadrienais” [Three Quadrennials]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 56, April 1961.

UNASP. https://www.unasp.br/.

Veloso, Mario. “La Historia del SALT” [The History of SALT]. Unpublished document, 2016.

Waldwogel, Luiz. Memórias de Tio Luiz [Memories of Uncle Luiz]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1988.

Notes

  1. UNASP, “Cursos de Graduação” [Undergraduate courses], accessed on May 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/3cZZBba.

  2. UNASP, “Unidade Vila Matilde” [Vila Matilde Unit], accessed on May 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2zlM6nD.

  3. UNASP, “Biblioteca Pr. John Lipke” [Pr. John Lipke Library], accessed on May 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2TvZdth.

  4. UNASP, “Vida no campus” [Campus life], accessed on May 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/3d7phCA.

  5. José Carlos Juliano Ebling, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino (Brazil College): It’s Foundation and Development” (Term Paper, Andrews University, 1974), 5.

  6. John Lipke, “Our Need of a Training School,” Missions Quarterly 5, no. 2 (second quarter, 1916): 14-15.

  7. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 81-82.

  8. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 7.

  9. Evangelist canvasser of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, in order to convey to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Colportagem” [Canvassing work], accessed on February 4, 2020,http://bit.ly/2J6tY1I.

  10. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 74, 77.

  11. Alberto Timm, org., A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 53.

  12. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  13. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 7.

  14. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 88.

  15. Augusto Gross, “Lançamento da primeira pedra do edifício da escola missionaria” [Laying of the first stone of the missionary school’s building], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 9 (September 1915): 3-4.

  16. Luís Henrique dos Santos, ed., UNASP - Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP - Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)] (Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015), 40.

  17. Ibid., 54.

  18. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 88.

  19. Ibid.

  20. Augusto Gross, “Lançamento da primeira pedra do edifício da escola missionaria” [Laying of the first stone of the missionary school’s building], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 9 (September 1915): 3.

  21. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 88, 94.

  22. Lucio Pereira de Souza, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” [Brazil College] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 5.

  23. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 11.

  24. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 119, 136-137.

  25. João Rabello, John Boehm: Educador Pioneiro [John Boehm: Pioneer Educator] (São Paulo, SP: CNMA, 1991), 119-121; Luiz Waldwogel, Memórias de Tio Luiz [Memories of Uncle Luiz] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1988), 54-55.

  26. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 11.

  27. Lucio Pereira de Souza, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” [Brazil College] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 5.

  28. “Section 4 – Educational Institutions,” Annual Statistical Reports (Washington D.C.: General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, 1917), 11.

  29. Natalia Pasternak Taschner, “Gripe espanhola: 100 anos da mãe das pandemias” [Spanish flu: 100 years of the mother of pandemics], Veja Saúde [Veja Health magazine], March 11, 2020, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YSr6yH.

  30. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 98.

  31. Luís Henrique dos Santos, ed., UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP - Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)] (Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015), 42.

  32. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist Faculty of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Brazil National Center of Adventist History, 2015), 14.

  33. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 12.

  34. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  35. Ibid.

  36. Alberto Timm, A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 53.

  37. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 121-122.

  38. Luís Henrique dos Santos, ed., UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP - Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)] (Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015), 56.

  39. Lucio Pereira de Souza, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” [Brazil College] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 5.

  40. Alberto Timm, org., A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 54.

  41. Superbom is “one of the largest companies in the field of healthy foods aimed at the vegan/vegetarian public in Brazil,” and belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Superbom, “A SUPERBOM. Há mais de 90 anos se preocupando com saúde” [The Superbom. Caring about health for more than 90 years], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/37yijUl.

  42. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 125.

  43. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  44. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College – Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 15.

  45. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  46. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 113.

  47. Alberto Timm, org., A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 55; Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 133.

  48. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

  49. Tânia Denise Kuntze, “Faculdade Adventista de Enfermagem: Memória Histórica - 1968-1998” [Adventist School of Nursing: Historical Memory - 1968-1998] (Doctoral thesis, University of São Paulo, 2010), 120.

  50. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist Faculty of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Brazil National Center of Adventist History, 2015), 22.

  51. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 28.

  52. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 135, 138.

  53. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  54. Lucio Pereira de Souza, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino” [Brazil College] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 9.

  55. “Três Quadrienais” [Three Quadrennials], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 56, April 1961, 25.

  56. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  57. J. N. Siqueira, “Novas da Colina IAENSE” [News from IAENSE Hill], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 60 (August 1965): 29.

  58. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  59. Ibid.

  60. Alberto Timm, A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 175; Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 29.

  61. Tânia Denise Kuntze, “Faculdade Adventista de Enfermagem: Memória Histórica – 1968-1998” [Adventist School of Nursing: Historical Memory – 1968-1998] (Doctoral thesis, University of São Paulo, 2010), 148.

  62. Gunther H. Bleck, “Novas da Colina IAENSE” [News from IAENSE Hill], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 64 (June 1969): 27-28.

  63. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  64. Alberto Timm, A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 74.

  65. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  66. Ibid.

  67. Alberto Timm, org., A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 76.

  68. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  69. Ibid.

  70. Mario Veloso, “La Historia del SALT” [The History of SALT] (Unpublished document, 2016), 12.

  71. Roberto C. Azevedo, “O Último Decreto” [The Last Decree], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September 1983): 21-22. 

  72. “Notícias 83” [News 83], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 78, August 1983, 26.

  73. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm, (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 11.

  74. “Mais Brilho na Colina” [A Greater Light On The Hill], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 7, year 79, July 1984, 24-25.

  75. “Para Preservar a História” [To Preserve History], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 83, May 1987, 26-27.

  76. “IAE poderá oferecer curso de Letras ainda em 88” [IAE will be able to offer Language Studies course in 88], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 84, March 1988, 20.

  77. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  78. “Escola Modelo” [Training School], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 85, April 1989, 18.

  79. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  80. “Dê um Salto para o Futuro!!!” [Take a Leap into the Future!!!], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 90, January 1994, 40.

  81. André M. Pasini, “IAE-C2: Origem e Desenvolvimento Físico” [IAE-C2: Origin and Physical Development], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm, (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 12.

  82. “Congresso Indica Marcos da Enfermagem” [Congress indicates milestones of Nursing], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 90, March 1994, 18.

  83. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  84. Ibid.

  85. “Educação Completa” [Complete Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8, year 94, August 1998, 18.

  86. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 31.

  87. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015): 14-19.

  88. Nevil Gorski, “IAE, uma luz para o Brasil” [IAE, a light for Brazil], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 10, year 95 (October 1999): 22-23.

  89. Michelson Borges, “Presente de Aniversário” [Birthday gift], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 96 (April 2000): 22.

  90. Renato Gross, “Ensino Superior” [Higher Education], in Instituto Adventista de Ensino Campus 2: 15 Anos de História [Brazil College Campus 2: 15 Years of History], ed. Alberto Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: Adventist University Press, 1999), 31.

  91. Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for he was the general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  92. Guilherme Silva, “Tijolos do conhecimento” [The Bricks of the Knowledge], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 97 (June 2001): 24.

  93. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015): 18.

  94. “Aula Magna do Governador” [Governor's Master Class], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1259, year 108, April 2013, 41; Michelson Borges, “Parceria que alimenta” [Partnership that feeds], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 97 (June 2001): 27.

  95. Michelson Borges, “Epopéia do Ensino Superior” [Higher Education Epic], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 6, year 98 (June 2003): 28; UNASP, “Ciência da Computação: Ficha técnica do curso” [Computer Science: Course technical file], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3gj0yfY; UNASP, “Educação Física - Licenciatura: Ficha técnica do curso” [Licentiate degree in Physical Education: Course technical file], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3ir3RDO.

  96. UNASP, “Educação Física - Bacharelado: Ficha técnica do curso” [Bachelor’s degree in Physical Education: Course technical file], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3dVtQQ0.

  97. UNASP, “Arquitetura e Urbanismo: Ficha técnica do curso” [Architecture and Urbanism: Course technical file], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/38lZFR2.

  98. Murilo Pereira, “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo inaugura nova unidade no Unasp SP” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital inaugurates new unit at Unasp SP], UNASP, November 4, 2013, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3dUl19l.

  99. Márcio Tonetti, “Culto de gratidão celebra os cem anos do UNASP” [Thanksgiving worship service celebrates 100 years of UNASP], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 11, 2015, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/38nqZyd.

  100. UNASP, “Engenharia da Computação: Ficha técnica do curso” [Computer Engineering: Course technical file], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2BXfXUu.

  101. Murilo Pereira, “Acesso ao ensino superior” [Access to higher education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 20, 2018, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/3eW8CmG.

  102. Aira Annoroso, “UNASP-SP promove abertura oficial das atividades acadêmicas em 2020” [UNASP-SP promotes official opening of academic activities in 2020], UNASP, January 20, 2020, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NQhJt9.

  103. Mairon Hothon, “Centro de Memória do Unasp é inaugurado na capital paulista” [Unasp History Center is inaugurated in São Paulo], UNASP, May 20, 2019, accessed on July 3, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NQlY7R.

  104. Gustavo S. Storch, “Como Foi Fundado o Seminário Adventista” [How Adventist Seminary was established], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 5, year 66 (May 1971): 12.

  105. Juvêncio Guerra e Jurandyr Guerra, Instrução particular: Associação dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia no Brasil. Colégio Adventista Brasileiro em 1932 [Private instruction: Seventh-day Adventists Association in Brazil. Brazil College in 1932] (Santo Amaro, SP: Rossolillo Printing Office, 1932), 135.

  106. E. R. Doehnert, A Vida de Emílio Doehnert [The life of Emílio Doehnert] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1997), 24.

  107. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s Thesis, University of São Paulo, 2001), 138-139.

  108. Ibid.

  109. Ibid.

  110. Tânia Denise Kuntze, “Faculdade Adventista de Enfermagem: Memória Histórica - 1968-1998” [Adventist School of Nursing: Historical Memory - 1968-1998] (Doctoral thesis, University of São Paulo, 2010), 123.

  111. “The Estratégia Saúde da Família [Family Health Strategy] (ESF) is the care model of Basic Health Care, which is based on the work of multiprofessional teams in an assigned territory and develops health actions based on knowledge of the local reality and the needs of its population. With the municipalization of the Health System, in 2001 (...) the Programa de Saúde da Família [Family Health Program] (PSF) and the Programa de Agentes Comunitários de Saúde [Community Health Agents Program] (PACS) were implemented through agreements signed with Civil Society Institutions.” Cidade de São Paulo [City of São Paulo], “Estratégia Saúde da Família - ESF” [Family Health Strategy - ESF], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/38nhf75.

  112. “Aula Magna do Governador” [Governor's Master Class], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1259, year 108, April 2013, 41.

  113. “Unidades Básicas de Saúde [Basic Health Units] (UBS) are places where you can receive free basic care in Pediatrics, Gynecology, General Medicine, Nursing and Dentistry. The main services offered by UBS are medical appointments, inhalations, injections, dressings, vaccines, collection of laboratory tests, dental treatment, referrals to specialties and provision of basic medication.” Associação Paulista para o Desenvolvimento da Medicina [São Paulo Association for the Development of Medicine], “Unidades Básicas de Saúde (UBS)” [Basic Health Units (UBS)], accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YRBZRn.

  114. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015): 14-19.

  115. “The Feira de Saúde [Health Fair] is an event that lasts one, two or more days, open to the public of all ethnicities and beliefs, free of charge and non-profit-making. Usually, it is organized in public places such as gymnasiums, schools, parks, squares, and malls. The community is invited to participate and to receive the benefits of the tests and guidelines.” Luiz Fernando Sella and Daniela Tiemi Kanno, Manual da Feira de Saúde [Health Fair Manual] (South American Division, 2015), 15.

  116. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015): 14-19.

  117. UNASP, “História da Acarte” [History of Acarte], accessed on May 26, 2020, https://bit.ly/3c4QNiT.

  118. Márcio Tonetti, “Maestro incansável” [Tireless conductor], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 7, 2019, accessed on July 7, 2020, https://bit.ly/3e8H0cA.

  119. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Muito Além do Ensino” [Beyond Teaching], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1297, year 110 (May 2015), 17; “Solenidade encerra Semana da Comunidade Adventista” [Solemnity ends Adventist Community Week], Câmara Municipal de São Paulo [São Paulo City Council], October 31, 2016, accessed on July 2, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YTMXFZ.

  120. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019; Stephanie Passos, “Igreja Adventista do Capão Redondo ganhará novo endereço em 2020” [Capão Redondo Adventist Church will gain new address in 2020], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], November 14, 2018, https://bit.ly/2NRuZO5.

  121. Ibid.

  122. “Holistic urban centers that can be used to meet community needs. Ellen G. White encouraged the existence of Urban Centers of Influence that would include lifestyle instructions, treatment centers, reading rooms, restaurants, canvassing work, lectures, instructions on how to prepare healthy food etc. Currently, Urban Centers of Influence may look different and offer different services and ministries, but the principle is still the same – to be tuned with other people's needs.” Missão Urbana [Urban Mission], “Centros de Influência” [Urban Centers of Influence], accessed on July 31, 2019, http://bit.ly/38U6V5P.

  123. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

  124. Geração 148 [Generation 148] is a project of young people who are dedicated to missionary work and is based on the biblical passage from Romans 14:8. Geração148, “Geração 148” [Generation 148], accessed on June 6, 2019, http://g148.org.br/.

  125. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

  126. Ibid.

  127. The project “Impacto Esperança [Hope Impact] is a program that encourages the practice of reading and provides a mass annual distribution of books on the part of Seventh-day Adventists in the South American territory.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website, “Impacto Esperança” [Hope Impact], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/34dZROO

  128. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

  129. Change Your World is an “organization created at Unasp - São Paulo campus, with the aim of promoting voluntary works/missions to different places in Brazil and the world.” Aira Annoroso, “Unasp oferece oportunidades de crescimento por meio do voluntariado” [Unasp provides opportunities for growth through volunteering], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], August 28, 2019, accessed on June 22, 2020, https://bit.ly/2YTpBza.

  130. Idia Almeida de Azevedo (secretary of the associate pro-rector of UNASP-SP), e-mail message to Carlos Flavio Teixeira (ESDA associate editor), June 30, 2019.

  131. John Boehm, “A Training School in Brazil,” Missions Quarterly 5, no. 2 (second quarter of 1916): 10.

  132. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino – Sua Fundação e Desenvolvimento” [Brazil College - Its Establishment and Development] (Monograph, Brazil College, 1986), 4; Luís Henrique dos Santos, ed., UNASP: Muito Além do Ensino: 100 anos de história (1915-2015) [UNASP - Beyond Teaching: 100 years of history (1915-2015)] (Hortolândia, SP: Multicomm, 2015), 256; Alberto Timm, org., A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma história de aventuras e milagres [Adventist education in Brazil: a history of adventures and miracles] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 177.

  133. For more information about UNASP, São Paulo campus, see the website https://www.unasp.br/sp/ or the social media: Facebook, Instagram and Twitter - @unaspsp and YouTube - UNASP SP.

×

Gorski, Nevil, Renato Ferreira Silva. "Brazil Adventist University – São Paulo Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 22, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GGU.

Gorski, Nevil, Renato Ferreira Silva. "Brazil Adventist University – São Paulo Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GGU.

Gorski, Nevil, Renato Ferreira Silva (2021, April 28). Brazil Adventist University – São Paulo Campus. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 22, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=8GGU.