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Petropolis Adventist Academy

By Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa, and Leônidas Verneque Guedes

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Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa lives in the State of Goiás, Brazil. He holds a degree in theology, languages and history from Brazil Adventist University. For a time he served as a writing assistant on the editorial team of the Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists at the South American Division.

Leônidas Verneque Guedes

Petropolis Adventist Academy (IPAE) is a boarding school with elementary and high school levels of education. It belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church and is part of the Adventist worldwide education network. The institution operates in the territory of the Southeast Brazil Union (USeB), which is located in Petrópolis, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Petrópolis is a municipality with 306 thousand inhabitants.1 This city is also known as the Imperial City of Brazil because its name derives from the junction of the Latin term petrus (Peter), referring to the first emperor of Brazil,2 with pólis (city) in Greek. Nowadays, the school serves 196 students on the campus and another 254 who live in the nearby community, with 450 students in total.3

The total area of IPAE is 576,475 m² with 17,350 m² of constructed area. The functioning of all the structures of this school institution is maintained by 115 people, including 8 workers, 2 ministers, and 105 employees.4 This number of employees includes 22 licensed teachers in the most diverse subjects of the school grid.5

Developments that Led to the Establishment of the School

The history of the Adventist work in Rio de Janeiro began with the arrival of missionary canvassers within 1893 and 1894 when the city was the capital of Brazil. They saw a place absorbed by all sorts of paganism.6 However, it was not long before Pastor Huldreich Graf (the first minister ordained to work in Brazil),7 organized the first Adventist church in the state of Rio de Janeiro and the second in Brazil, the church of Méier, on October 27, 1895.8 The Adventist message in Rio de Janeiro was strengthened by the arrival of pastors F. W. Spies in 1896 and Guilherme Stein, Jr. in 1899.9

Reports from a meeting of the Brazil Union indicate the existence of SDA members in Petrópolis as early as 1912. At the time, H. Meyer was transferred from the city of Rio de Janeiro to direct the church in Petrópolis,10 and in 1915, there were11 canvassers working in the region.12 In 1930, Daniel Feder was sent to live in Petrópolis and to carry out, in the same year, an evangelistic series.13 At that time, the city was part of the pastoral district of Rio de Janeiro (comprised of the Adventist churches of Rio de Janeiro, Niterói, Olaria, and Petrópolis). 14

Historically, SDA promotes its missionary work through three interconnected fronts: evangelism, health, and education.15 In this context, after a congregation is established, the natural concern of Adventist pioneers in 1934 was to offer the Church in the territory of the East Brazil Union (UEB, nowadays Southeast Brazil Union) a school whose educational scope was not just scientific but, in addition, would teach biblical morals and principles. This project was voted into existence on December 4, 1936.16

To carry this project forward, a campaign was organized to raise financial resources and, in 1937, a commission was elected to decide in which territory the school would be established. The commission decided that the appropriate place for setting up the academy would be up to 100 km from the city of Rio de Janeiro.17 The chosen point was one of the most beautiful corners of the Serra do Mar, a mountain range in the region of Petrópolis. Since then, the institution has remained in the same place.18

School Foundation

The yearning for the implementation of Adventist education in the region began to materialize on August 31, 1938, when the leadership of the Adventist Church in the East Brazil Union elected Pastor John D. Hardt as director of the future school. The cornerstone was laid on May 21, 1939, and in its foundation, the school was named Petropolis Educational and Agricultural Institute (IEAP).19

The first student at IEAP was Arnoldo Anniehs, and the construction of the first buildings were the first places students could earn part of their scholarships. That was how José Luduvice, Antônio Mateus, and Emília Tesch helped pay for their education. The first teachers to arrive were Pastor João Bork, Hilda Silva, João dos Passos, and Jonas Monteiro. In the same period, "Ernesto Bohry and João Sadowski were invited, the first to install a pottery, and the other to direct the construction work."20

Classes started in 1940, but there was still a lot to be built, and for that reason, classes were taught in several buildings at various times. Before the completion of the first buildings, the school was renamed East Brazil Academy (ITA). The beginning was a difficult time, so there were financial and accommodation problems for the students. Even so, over a period of 13 years, the school offered the elementary (1st to 4th grade) and middle school (5th to 8th grade) courses in addition to a two-year missionary and theological preparation course.21 That year, five young people sealed their covenant with God, and this first baptism ceremony foreshadowed the institution's missionary vocation.22

Because they were afflicted by such difficulties and were fearful of receiving even more students in these conditions, the school board forwarded requests to the South American Division (SAD) and to the General Conference of Adventist Church (GC) to obtain subsidies for the new structural plan. Even with this help, one of the buildings remained unfinished for about a year.23 However, this period was marked by the start of the construction of residential buildings and houses.24

History of the School

The arrival of 1941 was marked by the transfer of the funds necessary for the completion of the construction. Among these buildings were the boys dorm, the maintenance workshop (now used as a game room), the laundry (formerly next to the kitchen), and a residential house.25 While it was called “ITA”, the school had as its director Siegfried Júlio Schuwantes (1944-1946). This period was marked by the construction of one more residential dorm and the vegetable garden that today no longer exists due to the sale of the land where it was previously located.26

In the evangelistic arena, in the same year (1941), young students from ITA “carried out a lot of evangelistic efforts. The correspondence group sent leaflets to eighty addresses.” There was also a lay evangelism group that visited the Itaipava region, “preaching outdoors, resulting in the formation of the group of ‘Aspirants to Evangelism’, which met weekly.”27 In the third year of operation of the institution (1943), a group of teachers and leaders encouraged missionary activities and projects to collect donations. In total, 13 students were baptized that year, and they were recognized as “essentially missionaries.”28

Later, 1947 was marked by reforms and the creation of the honey industry called “SUPERITA.” In the following years, the reforms continued, and another residential dorm was built, and the general painting of the school was also completed. This period of reform was necessary since the architecture of the school suffered a lot from humidity and the long period of construction that required, at that time, ten years.29 At the beginning of its second decade of operation (1951), the Commercial Course expanded the ITA curriculum.

In 1964, the Scientific Collegiate courses (1st to 3rd year of High School) and Laboratory Assistant and Chemical Analysis courses were also implemented. The period of renovation of the buildings that were already in operation was followed by the construction of the classroom building. This phase of the school was marked by efforts to continue the construction of the main school building. Moreover, the college bought a truck, constructed more residential buildings, purchased a central water box (today replaced by an equipment made of fibers), and planted an orchard.30

Early on, the institute sought to awaken in the students a sense of missionary responsibility. The school intended students to be a source of light for the community “and in the very near future [...] to spread around the world carrying the precious message.” In 1958, for example, in a neighborhood close to the institution, “a series of conferences with lighting projections was held outdoors, [...] with an average attendance of 250 people.”31

The year 1958 also brought structural advancements to the institution. The construction of the school building took 18 years and was finally inaugurated on September 22. In this ceremony were present pastors Rodolpho Belz, president of Rio-Minas Conference (now the Rio de Janeiro Conference), and R. A. Wilcox, president of the East Brazil Union.32 At the same time, the construction of the auditorium, workshop, sports court, and residences began in addition to the expansion of the women's bathroom. The auditorium (currently a male chapel), whose construction was being carried out, was completed in the mid-1960s.33

In order to promote the integral development of students, in 1970, the institute held a Week of Prayer and Temperance with the presence of Pastor Anísio Chagas. At that time, the school had about 800 students.34 This exponential growth in the number of students required that the school always expanded its facilities, and something unprecedented until that time was accomplished within 1965-1972: the construction of the church. Inaugurated in 1972, this was the first church to belong exclusively to a school. This year also marks the end of the theological course due to the changes established by the Ministry of Education (MEC) in 1971. With that, the school was renamed IPE - Petropolis Academy.35

Still in that year, other professional courses were implemented, among them the Teaching (formerly “normal” course), Accounting Technician, and Data Processing Technician.36 A year later (1972), the school changed its name again, as the administration of the South America Division instructed all Church institutions to insert the word “Adventist” in their names. Consequently, the school changed its name to IPAE -Petropolis Adventist Academy, the name that remains with it today. Subsequently, seeking to improve the school's logistics, the institution's management acquired three Kombi vehicles and a grand piano, built a stable (which no longer exists due to the construction of the highway BR-040), and installed the school's first telephones.37

In the following year (1973), reforms were planned by the school board so they could be carried out starting in 1974.38 These adjustments were necessary due to the expropriation of part of the school's land for the expansion of Highway Br-040, which connects the states of Rio de Janeiro to the city of Juiz de Fora in the state of Minas Gerais.39 In later years (1975-1977), several facilities were renovated. The school building received new classrooms; the laundry, new and modern machines; and some houses for the teachers were built.

In 1977, the church received a new electronic organ, which was a donation from Golden Cross.40 At this time, IPAE offered the following courses: Kindergarten, Preschool, 1st and 2nd degree levels in the professional areas of Accounting Technician, Assistant Technician of Chemical Laboratory, and Teacher Training Course (Teaching).41 In 1979, IPAE hosted an Intensive Christian Leadership Course promoted by East Brazil Union. The objective was to make teachers and administrators aware of the need to have efficient and consecrated leaders to serve the Church. The event was attended by Pastor R. Bietz, the vice president of the General Conference of the SDA at that time.42

The beginning of the 1980s was marked by some of the achievements received with joy in the environment of the institution. One of them was the laying of the cornerstone of the Conservatory of Music, when donations were received from Adventist Dr. Milton Soldani Afonso (owner of the Golden Cross company) for the landscaping and lawn of the school in addition to the building official school entrance.43

On June 12, 1980, IPAE held a reception for the president of the republic at the time, João Figueiredo, and his entourage for a tribute on the school’s premises. The entourage was travelling to Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais. During this occasion, pastor and teacher Arthur Dassow spoke and the student choir sang the country’s national anthem. “The fact was published by different press agencies, and the school board received several congratulations calls for the initiative.”44

During the 1980s, the bakery (which is no longer in operation) was built, and the construction of the Conservatory and a semi-Olympic pool began. Such projects were soon completed, and there was also the construction of a sauna and a sports court with 1,000 m².45 One of the facts that marked the history of IPAE was its involvement with the food industry. The bakery received a new powerhouse with new transformers for its electrical network in the form of equipment from Superbom46 and the registration of the brand of vegetarian products under the name “Petrobom.” This Adventist Church food brand was founded by Pastor Cléo Fortes when he was the financial director of IPAE. He was subsequently called on to take on administrative advice for special sales in the South America Division.47

The 1990s were also marked by general advancements throughout the school. The innovations included the laying of the cornerstone of the new women's home; and the construction of the Gym, the Bodybuilding Academy, and the new laundry.48 The last change in the educational structure also occurred at that time. In 1996, due to changes in the laws that regulate education in Brazil,49 all professional courses were no longer offered, so IPAE continued to offer only Child Education as well as Elementary School and High School courses.50

The first decade of the new millennium arrived, and at IPAE, that time was marked by the conclusion of physical layout expansion. During this period, the girl’s dorm building with a swimming pool, laundry, chapel, and terrace were completed. In addition to this dorm, a new wing of the men’s dorm with swimming pool and laundry was also started and completed as well as the renovation and extension of the school building to a third floor and change of the façade. This building was reinaugurated on November 21, 2007, with financial resources donated by Dr. Milton Soldani Afonso. In recognition, the building received his name.51

Other works were also carried out with the participation of Dr. Milton Afonso, including the complete renovation of the church, the multisport gym, and the Music Conservatory. A heated swimming pool and wood-burning furnaces were also built to heat water in the residences. Storm drains and drainage networks were installed in the square and streets to avoid possible flooding.52

From 2010 forward has been a time of numerous advances. The classrooms and reception were renovated, a canteen was built inside the school building with tables and benches, TVs for the gym were purchased, lighting was installed throughout the school, as well as walkways were paved between the dorms and the classroom building. An innovation in the educational part was the implantation of the test system named “Dudow.” In this system, students carried out preparatory simulations for the entrance exam.53 Another achievement during this period, important for the sake of Adventist legacy and academic research, was the inauguration of the “Centro White Histórico e Criacionista” [Historic and Creationist White State Center].54

As for the improvements made in the last decade, IPAE and its students have benefited from a new Children's Educational structure with new rooms that have bathrooms adapted for children in addition to new furniture and playground. It was also during this period that cultural exchange was stimulated and investment was made in preparing high school students for the entrance exam. The institution also standardized its evaluation system and implemented the Master Spiritual Development Program - PMDE.55

More recently, the institution has invested in the reform of different school environments in addition to preparing a project enhancing the general identity of IPAE. In addition to investments in structure, the school dedicated a large space for the musical development of its students through various instrumental and vocal groups such as choirs, bands, and symphonic orchestras. The Musical Conservatory offers courses in more than 15 areas: piano, singing, flute, clarinet, sax, trumpet, trombone, violin, viola, cello, guitars, bass, drums, and children's music, among others. In addition to providing the learning of various instruments, these courses are always accompanied by musicality classes (or musical perception).

Since its foundation, the Petropolis Adventist Academy has maintained its stated mission “to promote, through Christian education, the harmonious development of students in physical, intellectual, social and spiritual aspects, so that they contribute positively to the community, the homeland and have a meaningful experience with God.”56 The vision of the school is "to be an institution recognized for the quality of teaching and for the genuine Christian influence exercised on its students." The values it works are: - “Knowledge of God as the source of all wisdom; - The Bible as a reference of conduct; - Commitment to excellence in educational service; - Sustainability; - Respect and ethics in interpersonal relationships; - Health, safety and socio-environmental responsibility. ”57

As for the enrollment numbers, the school had 396 students in 2004, reaching 469 in 2012; it was 387 in 2014; and recently 450 students in 2019.58 The number of teachers and staff over the years is directly related to how many students are enrolled in the institution. With the increase in the number of students, more professionals are needed. Tracking the number of employees and teachers was made easier with the computerization of the school secretary, which occurred in 2004. In that year, there were 33 employees serving in the most diverse functions as well as 18 teachers. At the end of 2012, the school had reached 80 employees and 20 teachers; In 2014, the records indicate there were then 84 employees and 21 teachers; and finally, in the year 2019, these numbers grew to 115 employees, which included 22 teachers who had graduated from higher education courses corresponding to their specific knowledge areas of the school grade.59

Over the years, IPAE has established a healthy relationship with the Brazilian government through diligent compliance with the laws. Therefore, the biggest challenge that IPAE at the time of this entry concerns its current financial situation, which needs to improve in order to update some structural areas that still need to be built or renovated.60

Historical Role of the School

The purpose of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is to deliver the last message of preparation before the advent of Christ on Earth, and everyone is invited to prepare for this final event in world history. As an institution belonging to the Adventist Education Network, the humanitarian activities that IPAE systematically carries out in its vicinity are intentionally planned to show the community the blessings of following Jesus.61

Aligned with the Global Mission evangelistic projects,62 IPAE is contributing to the implantation of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the city of Itaipava, and there is a church already implanted in the neighborhood of Sertão do Carangola, the Adventist Church of Vale do Carangola.63 The pastoral staff of the church of IPAE, together with a group of servants and students, promotes various activities with the community of the neighborhood where the church is located. There are lectures, visits, distribution of basic food baskets and warm clothing, a professional carpentry course, and programs aimed at youth through the Pathfinders club. The school also has a Mission Center that prepares young people to serve the church and communities wherever they are.64

Many activities are also offered to high school students through the chaplaincy of IPAE via the Religious Education curriculum, and they promote the involvement of boarding students in community missions and evangelistic activities. Among these practices are campaigns such as Anti-Bullying and Yellow September65 in addition to several musical groups that commonly perform in public venues. Many baptisms have been performed as a result of this involvement.66

In addition to these activities, the school is involved in programs promoted by the Adventist Church throughout South America such as Hope Impact,67 Breaking the Silence Campaign,68 Health Fairs69, and Home Construction and Renovation Projects.

What Remains to be Done to Fulfill the Mission of the School

Over the 80 years since IPAE was founded, its leaders have always sought the development of the school and the fulfillment of its mission. This was accomplished through small and large changes in the structure of the school environment and by encouraging students to participate in sports, create good reading habits, develop good relationships, and totally surrender their lives to God. Thus, the educational institution has taught its students to prepare themselves not only intellectually for the job market, but also for life.

The school administration seeks to make IPAE an institution of excellence and prominence in the community in which it is located. One of the means to achieve this objective is to reach at least 800 points in the evaluation in the National High School Exam (ENEM).70 In addition, funds need to be raised at this time in order to renovate its structures (in particular, male and female dorms) and renovate furniture in some buildings. Therefore, students who are part of this school must continue the outreach campaigns in churches, government schools, commerce, and neighboring communities in order to continue to attract new students.71 In the academic arena, the institution intends to implement language courses in Preschool and High School, and to continue promoting the preparation of students for the entrance exam.

IPAE will seek to advance by being aligned with the goals of Adventist education. “The pedagogical proposal of the Adventist Educational Network aims to meet the general learning needs, forming thoughtful and creative students.” IPAE follows this didactic line and, therefore, “encourages the transformation of knowledge into attitudes, based on solutions to problems related to the students’ daily lives.” Based on “the premises of Christian education, this proposal is committed to guiding the didactic activities of the schools in the network, systematizing the pedagogical practice and the school routine, printing the idea of teaching quality.”72 All of this is critical because it is necessary to prepare young people with Christian principles and values so they can live in a world that is increasingly distant from God’s ideal for human beings.73

Chronology of Directors74

IEAP - Petropolis Educational and Agricultural Institute (1939): John D. Hardt (1939-1940).

ITA - East Brazil Academy (1940-1959): Walter J. Brow (1941-1943); Siegfried Júlio Schuwantes (1944-1946); João Bork (1947-1949); Tossaku Kanada (1950); Jairo Araújo (1951); Darrel D. Holtz (1952-1953); Ernesto Roth (1954-1955); Silas Ferreira Lima (1955-1957).

IPE - Pretopolis Academy (1960-1971): Neander Calvin Harder (1958-1961); Cláudio Chagas Belz (1962-1964).

IPAE - Petropolis Adventist Academy (1972-present): Zizion Fonseca (1965-1972); Antônio Moisés (1973); Zeferino Stabnow (1974-1979); Arthur Dassow (1980-1984); Daniel Pereira Baia (1985-1987); Ner Costa Souza (1988-1990); Enoch da Silva (1990-1991); Ednilson Medeiros (1992-2000); Ervino Will (2001-2012); Jefferson Ricardo de Andrade (2012-2014); Elias Costa de Oliveira (2015-2019); Robledo Moraes (2019-present).75

Sources

“A Segunda Conferencia da União Brazileira” [The Second Meeting of Brazil Union]. Revista Adventista, (March-April 1912).

APS/IPAE System and Closure Reports/Secretary.

Barbosa, Paulo. “Atividades Missionárias no ITA” [Missionary Activites at ITA]. Revista Adventista 54, no. 9 (September 1959).

Brown, Walton J. “Convenções dos M. V. na Missão Rio-Minas Gerais” [Conventions of M.V. at Rio-Minas Gerais Mission]. Revista Adventista 34, no. 2 (February 1939).

Brown, Walton J. “De Todo o Brasil” [From all over Brazil]. Revista Adventista 39, no. 1 (January 1944).

Canedo, Roberto Gullón. Uma semente de esperança [A Seed of Hope]. História da estrutura denominacional [History of Denominational Structure]. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015.

Chagas, Anísio. “Novas da Associação Rio-Minas” [News from Rio-Minas Conference]. Revista Adventista, 65, no. 9 (September 1970).

Educação Adventista [Adventist Education]. https://www.educacaoadventista.org.br/.

Filho, Ubirajara de Farias Prestes. “Territórios e Fronteiras” [Territories and Bordes]. Revista do Programa de Pós-graduação em História da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso [Review of the Graduate Program in History at the Federal University of Mato Grosso], 6, no. 1 (January-June 2005).

Gross, Renato. Colégio Internacional de Curitiba: uma história de fé e pioneirismo [Curitiba International Academy: a history of faith and pioneerism]. Rio de Janeiro, RJ: Collins, 1996.

IPAE. http://ipae.org.br/.

“IPAE Homenageia Presidente Figueiredo” [IPAE Honors President Figueiredo]. Revista Adventista, (August 1980).

Minutes of the Rio de Janeiro Conference, December 7, 2000, September 27, 2012, and September 20, 2019. Rio de Janeiro Conference archives, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

Perez, Judson C. “História da Sociedade de Jovens da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia no Brasil, 1899 a 1999: uma análise da perspectiva missiológica” [History of the Youth Society of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, 1899 to 1999: an analysis from the missiological perspective]. Doctoral thesis, Adventist University of São Paulo, Campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2010.

“Relatório de Colportagem” [Canvassing Report]. Revista Adventista (March 1915).

Replogue, L. “O Primeiro Batismo no Instituto” [The First Baptism at the Institute]. Revista Adventista 35, no. 3 (March 1940).

Rio de Janeiro. Petrópolis. Brazil Census 2018. População estimada [Estimated population]. IBGE, accessed December 18, 2019, https://bit.ly/2YXGvwe.

Schwarcz, Lilia Moritz, and Heloisa Murgel Starling. Brasil: uma biografia [Brazil: a biography]. São Paulo, SP: Companhia das Letras, 2015.

“Seminário de Liderança Cristã Reúne Administradores no IPAE” [Christian Leadership Seminar Gathers Administrators at IPAE]. Revista Adventista (February 2019).

Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) website. http://www.adventistas.org/pt/.

Stabnov, Zeferino. “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of an Academy]. Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978).

Superbom [Brazil Food Factory]. https://www.superbom.com.br/.

“Superbom tem novos desafios” [Superbom has new challenges]. Revista Adventista, June 2003.

Thurston, W. H. “Brazil.” ARH 72, no. 15 (April 1895).

Thurston, W. H. “Brazil.” ARH 73, no. 40 (April 1896).

Wilcox, E. H. “União Éste Brasileira” [East Brazil Union]. Revista Adventista 25, no. 6 (June 1930).

Notes

  1. Brazil Census 2018, Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, geographical level Petrópolis (RJ) - 3303906, estimated population, IBGE, accessed December 18, 2019, https: / /bit.ly/2YXGvwe.

  2. Lilia Moritz Schwarcz and Heloisa Murgel Starling, Brasil: uma biografia [Brazil: a biography], São Paulo, SP: Companhia das Letras, 2015, 211.

  3. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  4. APS/IPAE System and Closure Reports/Secretary.

  5. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  6. W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” ARH 72, no. 15 (April 1895): 236.

  7. Renato Gross, Colégio Internacional de Curitiba: uma história de fé e pioneirismo [Curitiba International Academy: a history of faith and pioneerism], Rio de Janeiro, RJ: Collins, 1996, 45, 56.

  8. Roberto Gullón Canedo, Uma Semente de Esperança [A Seed of Hope]. História da Estrutura Denominacional [History of Denominational Structure], Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2015, 50.

  9. W. H. Thurston, “Brazil,” ARH 73, no. 40 (October 1896): 638.

  10. “A Segunda Comissão da União Brazileira” [The Second Meeting of Brazil Union], Revista Adventista, (March-April 1912): 11-12.

  11. Evangelist canvasser of the Seventh-day Adventist Church is the missionary who “develops his ministry by acquiring and selling to the public the publications edited and approved by the Church, to transmit to his fellow-men the eternal Gospel that brings salvation and physical and spiritual well-being.” Accessed August 30, 2018, http://bit.ly/2RDbZEm.

  12. “Relatório de Colportagem” [Canvassing Report], Revista Adventista, (March 1915): 6.

  13. E. H. Wilcox, “União Éste Brasileira” [East Brazil Union], Revista Adventista 25, no. 6 (June 1930): 11.

  14. Walton J. Brown, “Convenções dos M. V. na Missão Rio-Minas Gerais” [Conventions of M.V. at Rio-Minas Gerais Mission], Revista Adventista 34, no. 2 (February 1939): 11

  15. Ubirajara de Farias Prestes Filho, “Territórios e Fronteiras” [Territories and Borders], Revista do Programa de Pós-graduação em História da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso [Review of the Graduate Program in History at the Federal University of Mato Grosso ], 6, no. 1 (January-June 2005): 172.

  16. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 14.

  17. Ibid.

  18. Ibid., 16.

  19. Ibid., 14.

  20. Ibid.

  21. Records in reminiscent archives of the IPAE in archives at the Library Pastor Arthur Dassow/IPAE.

  22. L. Replogue, “O Primeiro Batismo no Instituto” [The First Baptism at the Institute], Revista Adventista 35, no. 3 (March 1940): 12.

  23. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 15.

  24. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  25. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 15.

  26. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  27. Judson C. Perez, “História da Sociedade de Jovens da Igreja Adventista do Sétimo Dia no Brasil, 1899 a 1999: uma análise da perspectiva missiológica” [History of the Youth Society of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, 1899 to 1999: an analysis from the missiological perspective], doutoral Thesis, Adventist University of São Paulo, campus Engenheiro Coelho, 2010, 148.

  28. Walton J. Brown, “De Todo o Brazil” [From all over Brazil], Revista Adventista 39, no. 1 (January 1944): 7

  29. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  30. Ibid.

  31. Paulo Barbosa, “Atividades Missionários no ITA” [Missionary Activities at ITA], Revista Adventista 54, no. 9 (September 1959): 24.

  32. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 15.

  33. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  34. Anísio Chagas, “Novas da Associação Rio-Minas” [News from the Rio-Minas Conference], Revista Adventista 65, no. 9 (September 1970): 30.

  35. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  36. Ibid.

  37. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 15.

  38. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  39. Ibid.

  40. “Golden Cross [is a] pioneer company in the supplementary health sector in Brazil and currently has about 500 thousand business customers.” Accessed January 16, 2020, http://bit.ly/2u938SN.

  41. Zeferino Stabnov, “1978 – Ano Mundial da Educação Adventista – Maravilhosa História de Um Colégio” [1978 - World Year of Adventist Education - Wonderful History of a College], Revista Adventista 73, no. 5 (May 1978): 15.

  42. “Seminário de Liderança Cristã Reúne Administradores no IPAE” [Christian Leadership Seminar Gathers Administrators at IPAE], Revista Adventista (February 2019): 22.

  43. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  44. “IPAE Homenageia Presidente Figueiredo” [IPAE Honors President Figueiredo], Revista Adventista (August 1980): 22.

  45. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  46. Superbom is “one of the biggest companies in the branch of healthful foods directed to vegetarian/vegan public of Brazil” that belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Accessed December 18, 2019, https://bit.ly/37yijUl.

  47. “Superbom tem novos desafios” [Superbom has new challenges], Revista Adventista, (June 2003): 30.

  48. Leonidas Guedes (executive secretary/Southeast Brazil Union Communication), e-mail message to the author, September 17, 2019.

  49. Laws of Directives and Bases of National Education (LDB), Laws: 4.024/61, 5.692/71, 9.394/96; Federal Constitution of 1988; Law no. 8.069/90 (Statute of the child and the adolescent), in addition to the laws of SEE/RJ.

  50. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  51. Ibid.

  52. Ibid.

  53. Ibid.

  54. Ibid.

  55. Ibid.

  56. IPAE, “Home”, accessed December 18, 2019, http://ipae.org.br/.

  57. Ibid.

  58. Leônidas V. Guedes (Southeast Brazil Union executive secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  59. Ibid.

  60. Ibid.

  61. Ubirajara de Farias Prestes Filho, “Territórios e Fronteiras” [Territories and Borders], Revista do Programa de Pós-graduação em História da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso [Review of the Graduate Program in History at the Federal University of Mato Grosso] 6, no. 1 (January-June 2005): 172.

  62. “Global Mission is the front-line mission arm of the Adventist Mission, a department at the world headquarters of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Global Mission projects begin as local initiatives. It supports local frontline ministry initiatives in areas not penetrated [by the Adventist Church] and helps to involve all church departments in this task.” Accessed January 15, 2020, http://bit.ly/35Wz9e0.

  63. Leônidas V. Guedes (Southeast Brazil Union executive secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), 17 September 2019; Minutes of the Rio de Janeiro Conference, no. 00-176, December 7, 2000; Minutes of the Rio de Janeiro Conference, no. 12-048, September 27, 2012; Minutes of the Rio de Janeiro Conference, no. 19-072, September 20, 2019.

  64. Pathfinders Club is made up of “boys and girls aged 10 to 15 years old, from different social classes, color, religion. They meet in general once a week to learn how to develop talents, skills, perceptions and a taste for nature.” These boys and girls “vibrate with outdoor activities. They like camps, hiking, climbing, explorations in the woods and caves. They can cook outdoors, making fire without phosphorus.” In addition, they demonstrate “skill with discipline through united order and have creativity awakened by the manual arts. They also combat the use of smoking, alcohol and drugs.” Accessed October 9, 2019, http://bit.ly/2FDRqTh.

  65. “The Yellow September is an awareness campaign on suicide prevention. In Brazil, it was created in 2015 by Center for Valuing Life, Federal Council of Medicine and Brazilian Psychiatric Association, with the proposal of associating color to the month that marks the World Day for the Prevention of Suicide (September 10). The idea is to paint, illuminate and stamp objects and surfaces in yellow, ensuring more visibility to the cause. Throughout the last years, schools, universities, entities of the public and private sector and the general public were involved in this movement in north and south Brazil.” Accessed January 8, 2020, https://bit.ly/2N8frFJ.

  66. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  67. The project “Impact Hope" promotes reading and provides the annual distribution of Adventist books in the territory of South America. Accessed April 18, 2019, https://bit.ly/34dZROO.

  68. “Breaking the Silence is an educational and prevention project against abuse and domestic violence promoted annually by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in eight countries in South America, (Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay) since the year 2002.” Accessed January 16, 2020, https://bit.ly/2WoDfIW.

  69. “Based on the classic ‘The Science of Good Living’ and the latest findings from science, Adventists believe that eight of these habits are critical to maintaining health and recovering it in most cases. And it is to promote the practical teaching of these eight habits that the Health Fair exists - an official program of the Ministry of Health of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, which is nonprofit and is carried out by volunteers.” Accessed December 5, 2019, https://bit.ly/2PwE5hR.

  70. The National High School Exam (Enem) was created in 1998 and aims to assess student performance at the end of basic schooling. “Enem is used as a selection criterion for students who intend to apply for a scholarship at the University for All Program (ProUni). In addition, about 500 universities are already using the exam result as a selection criterion for entering higher education, either complementing or replacing the entrance exam.” Accessed March 26, 2019, http://bit.ly/35XZGb7.

  71. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  72. Educação Adventista [Adventist Education], “Proposta Educacional” [Educational Proposal], Accessed January 28, 2020, https://bit.ly/2Rx5J2m.

  73. Leônidas V. Guedes (USeB Executive Secretary/Communication), e-mail message to Rodolfo Figueiredo de Sousa (ESDA Redactor), September 17, 2019.

  74. Ibid.

  75. More information about IPAE can be found on their website: http://ipae.org.br/ or on social networks - Facebook: @colegioadventistaipae; Instagram: @ ipaeoficial; Twitter: @ipaeoficial and Youtube: TVIPAE.

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Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de, Leônidas Verneque Guedes. "Petropolis Adventist Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 21, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIB0.

Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de, Leônidas Verneque Guedes. "Petropolis Adventist Academy." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 21, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIB0.

Sousa, Rodolfo Figueiredo de, Leônidas Verneque Guedes (2021, April 28). Petropolis Adventist Academy. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 21, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BIB0.