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Aerial view of UNASP-EC in 2018

Photo courtesy of UNASP- EC Archives, accessed on December 2, 2019, https://bit.ly/35JPaES.

Latin American Adventist Theological Seminary - UNASP Campus

By Letícia Daniel Bessa

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Letícia Daniel Bessa

The Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary (Seminário Adventista Latino-Americano de Teologia, or SALT) is a Seventh-day Adventist institution responsible for theological education in the territory of the South American Division. SALT comprises eight regional campuses and one of them operates in the territory of the Central Brazil Union Conference. It is known as SALT-UNASP because it is located in the Brazil Adventist University, Engenheiro Coelho campus (Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo, UNASP-EC), at Pastor Walter Boger Municipal Road, kilometer 3.4, Zip Code 13445-970, Lagoa Bonita neighborhood, city of Engenheiro Coelho, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

Developments that Led to the Institution’s Establishment

The establishment of the first Adventist Theological Seminary campus in Brazilian territory dates back to the beginning of the Adventist work in Brazil, as well as the beginning of Adventist education at the end of the 19th century.1 Around 1880, a package containing ten copies of the magazine Stimme der Warheit und Prophetischer Erklärer (The Voice of Truth and Prophetic Exhibitor, in German) was sent to the city of Brusque, a German colony in the state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. The package, sent from Battle Creek, Michigan, in the United States, arrived at Davi Hort’s warehouse, addressed to the German Carlos Dreefke.2 Some of the magazines remained in his warehouse and he used them as packing for goods he was sending to various places in the southern part of the country. The others he passed on to Dreefke, who had no interest in the Adventist message, but distributed the magazines among his warehouse visitors. Soon after, another man named Dressler also started to receive the materials, and he sold them to buy alcoholic beverages. In this unusual way the message spread to several places in southern Brazil.3

As soon as church leaders realized that these materials were being read and their message was being accepted, they saw the need to send missionaries to South America. One of these was Frank H. Westphal, who in 1895 arrived in the town of Gaspar Alto, also a German colony in the current municipality of Gaspar, 27 kilometers from Brusque. In Gaspar Alto there was a good group of believers who was baptized by Pastor Westphal upon his arrival. On June 15, 1895, the Adventist church of Gaspar Alto was organized, being the first Adventist church in Brazil.4

This was a time of Adventist educational expansion around the world, and it did not take long for schools to start in Brazil.5 The first one was established in 1896 in the city of Curitiba. It was called Curitiba School, now Bom Retiro Adventist Academy. The second school was established in June 1897 in the city of Gaspar Alto, under the name of Gaspar Alto School, now Taquary School. At first it was just a local church school, but soon its founders realized the need to train Adventist workers. Under the direction of Guilherme Stein Jr., in 1898 a dormitory was built and that was the beginning of a boarding school. In 1900 the school was transformed into a missionary school whose purpose was to train Adventist workers and teachers. Three years later, in 1903, the school was moved to the city of Taquari, in Rio Grande do Sul, a state that at that time included the largest number of Adventists in Brazilian territory.6

Due to the distance of Taquari from other regions of Brazil, Rio Grande Conference, now Rio Grande do Sul Conference, recommended the transfer of the Taquary School activities to a more central area of the country. This transfer happened in 1907 when it was moved to the city of São Bernardo, state of São Paulo, in southeastern Brazil. However, with no resources to continue operating, the school closed its doors in 1910.7 In 1911 the school administration raised money from the sale of the property. This money was sent to the Brazilian Union Conference headquarters (now Central Brazil Union Conference) in São Paulo to be added to an education fund for the purchase of land that could house a new educational institution designed to prepare missionaries. In 1915 São Paulo Mission, now São Paulo Conference, met to discuss the need to create “a school that would prepare workers for the national field.”8

Foundation of the Institution

During the above-mentioned meeting, Isadora Spies, the wife of Pastor Frederick W. Spies, president of the union, emphasized São Paulo Mission’s appeal.9 In addition, John Boehm, responsible for launching the new institution, committed himself to establishing a theological seminary in the country. On April 28, 1915, with the accumulated education fund, plus a donation made by the General Conference in 1909, Pastor Spies and the Adventist leadership in Brazil purchased land located in the municipality of Santo Amaro, in the metropolitan region of São Paulo city. A few days later, on May 6, John Boehm and a few other men went to the city to start building the school.10

On July 3, 1915, classes began for the ministerial course, which was the first Adventist Church theological course taught in Brazil.11 The classes were taught in tents improvised by the institution’s pioneers while the construction of the school was in progress. There were 12 students, with Pastors John Lipke, John Boehm, and Paulo Hennig as the first teachers.12 On August 2 the cornerstone of the first building was laid. Thus, the official inauguration of the institution, Brazilian Seminary of the Brazilian Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists took place.13

When the new Brazilian Seminary began, the classes taught were preparatory classes for canvassers. Later, in April 1916, the school began its first academic year with 25 students from different regions of Brazil. A year later, in 1917, Professor Albertina Rodrigues da Silva, the first Brazilian Adventist professor, joined the faculty of the institution. At that time, Pastor John Lipke was the school director.14

In addition to the basic subjects, the theological course curriculum taught subjects that provided for a deepening understanding in complementary areas. In 1918 the institution was renamed “Seminário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia” (Seminary of the Brazilian Union Conference), and the ministerial course teachers taught the following subjects: Bible, denominational history, world history, history of Brazil, geography, natural sciences, physiology, Portuguese grammar, English, French, German, mathematics, calligraphy, music and singing, stenography, and Bible work.15 In 1919 the institution had its status changed again and became known as Seminário Adventista (Brazilian Seminary). Four years later, another modification was needed, and the college was renamed Colégio Adventista (Brazilian Seminary).16

The college’s first graduation was in 1922. The class motto was Rumo ao Mar (Towards the Sea), and the nine students were: Rodolpho Belz, Domingos Peixoto da Silva, Adolpho Bergold, Guilherme Frederico Denz, Luiz Waldvogel, Adelina Zorub, Alma Meyer, Isolina Avelino, and Thereza Filonila Santos.17

As there was no requirement regarding the previous education of student accepted to attend the seminary, they all graduated with different levels of proficiency.18 In its first years of operation, the seminary did not require that its students have a high school certificate. Therefore, the theology studies did not have the status of a graduate course. The curricular of the first classes was composed of basic core subjects such as arithmetic, Portuguese, and world history. In 1925, 20 percent of the course subjects were “core subjects,” which would change over time. In those first decades after its establishment, in order to attract students, the school published advertisements in Adventist journals, both in Brazil and abroad. Some advertisements contained testimonies from former students, while others showed how students contributed, through their education, to Adventist Church development in Brazil and elsewhere in the world. The result was that many students from various parts of the country and abroad learned about the Brazilian Seminary and wanted to study there.19

History of the Institution

In 1926 the theology preparatory course, which until then had been called the ministerial course, was renamed introductory ministerial. In the 1930s the course underwent a major change in its curriculum. Subjects with more theological content became part of the curriculum, while some basic core subjects were no longer taught.20 In the same period, some students started high school at the institution and they were introduced to theological subjects in their last year. In 1939 Pastor Domingos Peixoto da Silva became director, being the first Brazilian director of the theological seminary. In the following two years, the institution went through two changes of status, and changed its name to names already used before. In 1940 it changed to Seminário Adventista (Brazilian Training School), and in 1941 it was changed to Colégio Adventista (Brazilian Junior College).21

In 1942 another significant change took place in the nomenclature of the course, and it was officially called theology course. Also, in 1942, the school was renamed to Colégio Adventista Brasileiro (Brazil College, or CAB).22 That year, CAB had the highest number of enrollments in its history thus far. Out of the 303 students enrolled by August, 243 were for admission to the high school and theology courses, and 60 were for the elementary school.23 Nine students graduated from the theology course that year. They were: Sesóstris César, José Darci de Carvalho, Josino D. Campos, Orion Fonseca, Jonas A. Paula, Francisco N. Siqueira, Pedro L. de Souza, Leon M. Harder, and Manuel S. Castro.24 Records show that in the two decades following the first graduation, the number of students graduating from the theology course was 189. Of these, 153 dedicated themselves to serving the Adventist Church.25

In 1942 the seminary students participated in an Ingathering campaign (Recolta), through which they collected 10,000 cruzeiros, a considerable amount of money at the time. In the same period, several series of meetings were held in the cities of Campinas and Mogi das Cruzes, in addition to meetings held throughout the state of São Paulo. As a result, 15 people were prepared for baptism. Under the direction of teacher Jerônimo G. Garcia, the students preached to residents near the college in the region of Capão Redondo.26 The course continued to train missionaries and, by the end of the 1950s, it had graduated more than 30 classes of pastors and had a faculty of 12 teachers.27

One of the biggest changes for the theological course happened in 1955 when the seminary started to require a high school certificate when students applied. As a result, CAB officially became a higher education college. In this context, the seminary activities were now managed by the Faculdade Adventista de Teologia (Adventist School of Theology, or FAT), which was under the jurisdiction of CAB. Also, in 1955, the curriculum was transformed so it gave more focus to historical theology. Among the subjects that were incorporated were history of missions and history of religions. The curriculum of the theological course had a more balanced distribution among all areas of theology.28

In 1956, FAT started the Bible instructor course—a training program that comprised the first three years of theology—to train women who wanted to work with evangelism. The requirement for enrollment was completion of high school. In addition, FAT started the theological extension course, which operated as an intensive theology course offered during summer vacation. This program was designed for people who had not finished the theology course, and for people who qualified to start a higher education course and wanted to go deeper into the theology area.29 In 1956, Pastor Siegfried Kümpel was appointed as the first FAT exclusive director. In the following years this role was performed by the campus director.30

In 1961, CAB was renamed Instituto Adventista de Ensino (Brazil College, or IAE), and throughout the 1960s, FAT continued to prepare missionaries.31 In the 1970s it started to admit two classes of theology students per year, serving up to 120 new students each year. In 1979 the Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary was implemented within SAD and located in the division headquarters in Brasilia, capital of Brazil.32 SALT-SAD was created having the IAE (now UNASP) and the Colégio Adventista do Prata (River Plate College), in Argentina, now Universidade Adventista do Prata (River Plate Adventist University), as its first two regional campuses. In the 1980s additional changes took place, especially regarding the postgraduate courses. In January 1981, SALT-SAD started the masters in pastoral theology at IAE, so that the theologians graduated by the school had a broader academic background.33

In July 1983, IAE suffered an expropriation of 800,200 square meters of its total land area, leaving it with only 300,000 square meters of its original property. The space was expropriated by São Paulo City Hall because it was considered of social interest for the construction of council houses.34 For this reason, the IAE, the South Brazil Union Conference (current Central Brazil Union Conference), and the South American Division leaders endeavored to find a new campus for the institution. The goal was to find a place that was away from São Paulo, which had already developed property beginning in 1915, thus heeding to the counsel of the Spirit of Prophecy.35

In August 1983 some South Brazil Union Conference leaders visited several farms in the countryside of São Paulo. After analyzing each place visited, they found two farms considered ideal in the city of Tatuí. Thus, on August 31, in order to make a decision on the matter, an IAE assembly was held, but there was no agreement in favor of either of the farms. On September 8, the IAE director, Pastor Walter Boger, received a selling proposal for a farm called Lagoa Bonita (Beautiful Pond), located in the municipality of Artur Nogueira, 58 kilometers from Campinas, and also in the countryside of São Paulo.36 On September 11, 1983, Pastor Boger visited Lagoa Bonita Farm and two days later the union leaders arrived at the location. The leaders approved the area and, on the same day, SAD bought Lagoa Bonita Farm on which to build the new IAE campus.37

On June 17, 1984, the cornerstone of the campus, known as the New IAE, was laid.38 With the construction of the new campus, the school, SALT-SAD and FAT leaders recognized the need to transfer the theology course to the new space, away from large urban centers. At the time, Capão Redondo region was experiencing exponential growth. There was no longer “the same simplicity considered ideal for the formation of new pastors,” as Ellen G. White once guided. It was then, eight years after the purchase of Lagoa Bonita Farm, in 1991, that FAT was transferred to the IAE campus, in Artur Nogueira. The transfer started with the first- and second-year theology classes.39

With the transfer of the course and students, Professors Emilson dos Reis and Wilson Paroschi moved to the new campus neighborhood. The other FAT professors traveled to the New IAE the day before their classes. In addition, the seminary management provided vans for the transportation of students who needed to do their internships. Unlike the city of São Paulo, where there were many churches, the metropolitan region of Campinas had fewer congregations, many of which were far from the campus.40 As there was still no specific building for the classes, theology classes were taught in two rooms on the ground floor of the communication center, which was still under construction. At the same time, the higher education building was being erected and it was inaugurated in 1992.41

Another change took place at this time. The emancipation of the Engenheiro Coelho district made the new campus part of this new municipality, no longer belonging to Artur Nogueira. On February 15 and 16, 1992, in the new IAE, the seminary held the graduation of the third class of the master in theology students in Brazil, which had started in the IAE seminary in São Paulo in 1988.42 In 1993, 12 years after the beginning of the master in theology degree, the doctoral program in pastoral theology started, to further prepare the professors.43 With the increase in courses and its institutional development, in 1999 IAE became Centro Universitário Adventista de São Paulo (Brazil Adventist University, or UNASP) and, in that same year, FAT was integrated into SALT-SAD, known now as SALT-UNASP.44

In 2003 the theology course at SALT-UNASP was recognized by the Ministério da Educação e Cultura (Ministry of Education and Culture, or MEC), and started to grant diplomas recognized by government bodies.45 In 2004 another important achievement marked the history of this regional SALT campus. For the first time, a group of students engaged in evangelism outside the country in the city of Beira, Mozambique. This evangelistic outreach was expanded with the creation of the Núcleo de Missões e Crescimento de Igrejas (Mission and Church Growth Center, or NUMCI) in 2007, under the direction of Pastor Berndt Dietrich Wolter. NUMCI was created to provide emphasis on sending student missionaries to several countries.46

In 2012 there was another change in the curriculum of the theology course, and this became effective in early 2013. The total workload of the course was reduced, due to the decrease in the subjects taught. More than 120 students entered the seminary annually, while about 100 students graduated. Out of the 94 classes which had graduated, SALT-UNASP had graduated 2,646 theologians throughout its history. The qualification of the professors is also worth noting. In 2013, 11 of the 15 professors had a doctoral degree.47

In 2016, SALT-UNASP graduate program received the highest score in the MEC evaluation, which emphasized the excellence of the theological education offered by the seminary. During the evaluation the following aspects of the course were considered: structure of the institution, qualifications of professor, academic production, profile of students, supervised internship, and curriculum. The dedication of each teacher and the methodology applied in the course were also evaluated.48 In 2019, in its second participation in the assessment of the National Assessment of Student Achievement, the graduate course in theology at SALT-UNASP got a high evaluation score.49 That same year, SALT-UNASP graduated its 100th class of students in theology.50

Historical Role of the Institution

In its centenary journey, SALT-UNASP has positively influenced the development of Adventism, both abroad and in Brazil, and also around its campus. João Gnutzmann, the first Brazilian missionary who was sent to Africa in 1928, is an example of the seminary’s influence abroad.51 Back in Brazil, around 1974, Gnutzmann became one of the leaders of the IAE.52 Like Gnutzmann, other missionaries studied at the seminary and served outside Brazil, in countries like Portugal and France. Another aspect of the seminary’s connection to the worldwide church involved the construction of the first FAT building. In the third quarter of 1974, the 13th Sabbath worldwide Sabbath School offerings were designated for the construction of the college academic building. The building was built in 189 days and was inaugurated in 1978.53

The institution also affected the number of Adventist congregations in São Paulo. Due to work led by the theology professors and students of the former IAE, by 1985 the following congregations were established in the institution vicinity: Capão Redondo, Alvorada, Jardim Lilah, Santo Eduardo, Palmeiras, Campo de Fora, Jardim Kennedy, Valo Velho, Jardim Margaridas, Jardim M. Sampaio, Campo Limpo, Vila das Belezas, Jardim São Luís, Itapecerica, Santo Amaro, and Juquitiba.54 The increase in the number of churches shows the relevance of the seminary for the Adventist development in the region around it and how SALT-UNASP students contributed to the progress of the work.

As a result of the work of the seminary, there was a notable growth in the number of workers who were available to serve the Adventist Church, not only in São Paulo, but throughout the Brazilian territory. When looking at the genesis of the Adventist educational movement, one year after the inauguration of the Brazilian Seminary in1916, there were 93 workers in the country; while in 1985, on the 70th anniversary of the institution, 2,585 workers were at the service of the Church. Most of these workers were former students of IAE and the seminary.55 Over the years the seminary has continued to prepare workers with a correct vision of the ministerial work.56

Beginning in 1992 when the seminary was transferred to the countryside of São Paulo, the growth of the Church extended to the metropolitan region of Campinas. In 1991, in the territory now served by the conferences West São Paulo, Central São Paulo, and Southwest São Paulo, there were 35 churches and 22 groups, totaling 57 congregations, all in the region of Campinas. In 2019, after two decades of SALT-UNASP active presence, this same territory now has 133 organized churches and 96 groups, totaling 229 congregations. This is more than four times the number recorded in 1991. Thus, the establishment of SALT in Engenheiro Coelho helped church growth in general, but especially in this region.57

Historically, SALT-UNASP training involves direct engagement of students in pastoral practices. Each year these students have internships in missionary and community activities such as Sabbath School, small groups,58 weeks of prayer, evangelistic series over a three-month period, and Ingathering. These activities are carried out at UNASP and its vicinity, as well as in other regions of Brazil and in other parts of the world.59

Further evidence of SALT-UNASP influence can be seen in the contribution that this institution made to the rise of other Adventist seminaries in Brazil, as was the case of the Instituto Teológico Adventista (East Brazil Academy, or ITA), now Instituto Petropolitano Adventista de Ensino (Petropolis Adventist Academy, or IPAE), and Educandário Nordestino Adventista (Northeast Brazil Academy, or ENA), closed in 2000,60 SALT of the Instituto Adventista Paranaense (Parana Adventist College, or SALT-IAP), and SALT of the Faculdade Adventista da Amazônia (Amazonia Adventist College, or SALT-FAAMA). ITA theological seminary was deactivated in the 1950s, while ENA was transferred to Faculdade Adventista da Bahia (Bahia Adventist College, or SALT-FADBA) in 1988. By forming leaders and preparing some of the teachers who work in these institutions, SALT-UNASP has met the Church’s need for new workers, as well as strengthening denominational doctrines.61

Complying with the motto “Academic Excellence and Passion for Mission,” SALT-UNASP continues to expand its evangelistic ministry in fulfillment of its mission to inspire and prepare workers who are dedicated to the ministry. The regional campus has sought to continuously contribute to the academic and theological area of the world Adventist Church through journals produced in partnership with UNASP’s Imprensa Universitária Adventista (UNASP’s Adventist University Press, or UNASPRESS).62 In addition, articles by several seminary professors have been published by theology journals in Brazil and worldwide. Currently, SALT-UNASP faculty and students are participating in various Adventist Church’s initiatives, such as the new Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary, the Seventh-day Adventist Bible Dictionary, and the new Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists (ESDA).63

What Remains to Be Done to Fulfill the Institution’s Mission

Since its establishment the seminary has worked to fulfill the mission assigned to it by the Seventh-day Adventist Church to prepare qualified workers to serve the members and guide the Church in preaching of the Word of God. Currently, one of the SALT-UNASP educational goals is to maintain a balance between academic preparation and pastoral practice, and continue to graduate qualified pastors “to carry the message of the gospel to all peoples and in any situation.”64 In a scenario of continuous transformations that the planet goes through, whether in the political, scientific, philosophical, economic, or technological fields, SALT remains attentive to the challenge of offering theological education that is appropriate to the 21st century, but that remains solidly based on the firm foundation of the Word of God and the guidance of the Spirit of Prophecy. Based on this, SALT-UNASP will continue to be committed to its mission until the return of Jesus.65

Chronology of Administrative Directors66

Brazilian Seminary of the Brazilian Union Conference of the Seventh-day Adventists (Colégio Missionário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia):

John Boehm (1915); John Lipke (1916-1918).

Seminary of the Brazilian Union Conference (Seminário da Conferência da União Brasileira dos Adventistas do Sétimo Dia):

Thomas Steen (1918-1927).

Brazilian Seminary (Seminário Adventista):

Thomas Steen (1918-1927).

Brazilian Seminary (Colégio Adventista):

George B. Taylor (1928-1931); Ellis R. Maas (1932-1937); Lloyd E. Downs (1937-1938).

Brazilian Training School (Seminário Adventista):

Domingos Peixoto da Silva (1939-1947).

Brazilian Junior College (Colégio Adventista):

Domingos Peixoto da Silva (1939-1947).

Brazil College (Colégio Adventista Brasileiro):

Dario Garcia (1948-1949); Jerome G. Garcia (1950-1953); Rodolpho Belz (1954-1956).

Adventist School of Theology (Faculdade Adventista de Teologia):

Siegfried Kümpel (1956-1969); Nevil Gorski (1970); Jerome Justesen (1971-1973); Robert Davis (1974-1975); Orlando Ritter (1975-1976); Wilson Endruweit (1977-1980); Joel Sarli (1980-1983); Walter Boger (1984); Wilson Endruweit (1985-1993); Jorge Burlandy (1994-2002).

Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary (Seminário Adventista Latino-Americano de Teologia - UNASP Campus):

Amin A. Rodor (2003-2008); Emilson dos Reis (2009-2015); Reinaldo Siqueira (2016-present).

Sources

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Notes

  1. William Timm, “120 anos de ensino” [120 Years of Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 28, 2016, accessed on July 10, 2019, https://bit.ly/2JNrTbJ.

  2. Michelson Borges, “Raízes da Nossa História” [Roots of Our History], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 9, 2018, accessed on September 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZBGxLT.

  3. “Divisão Sul-Americana 70 Anos” [70 Years of the South American Division], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 3, year 82, March 1986, 22.

  4. Michelson Borges, “Raízes da Nossa História” [Roots of Our History], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 9, 2018, accessed on September 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZBGxLT.

  5. George R. Knight, “A Dinâmica da Expansão Educacional. Uma Lição da História Adventista,” [The Dynamics of Educational Expansion. A Lesson in Adventist History], in A Educação Adventista no Brasil: Uma História de Aventuras e Milagres [Adventist Education in Brazil: A History of Adventures and Miracles], org. Alberto R. Timm (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: UNASPRESS, 2004), 23.

  6. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 10-11.

  7. Michelson Borges, “Raízes da Nossa História” [Roots of Our History], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], January 9, 2018, accessed on September 14, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZBGxLT.

  8. Renato Stencel, “O processo de expansão educacional: o Ensino superior adventista no Brasil,” [The Educational Expansion Process: Adventist Higher Education in Brazil]. Acta Científica - Ciências Humanas [Scientific Report - Human Sciences] 1, no. 10 (March 2006): 38.

  9. Ibid.

  10. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37.

  11. “Escola de Missão de S. Amaro” [S. Amaro Mission School], Revista Mensal [Monthly Review] 10, no. 10, October 1915, 5-6.

  12. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 12.

  13. Ibid.

  14. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37.

  15. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 14.

  16. Elder Hosokawa, “Da Colina, Rumo ao Mar” [From the Hill, Towards the Sea] (Master’s thesis, Universidade de São Paulo [University of São Paulo], 2001), 121-122.

  17. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37.

  18. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 18-19.

  19. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 19-23.

  20. Ibid, 19, 20.

  21. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37; Nevil Gorski, personal knowledge for having been general director of the institution for two periods, 1967-1975 and 1990-1998.

  22. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 21.

  23. Domingos Peixoto da Silva, “O Colégio Adventista Brasileiro” [Brazil College], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 37 (November 1942): 15.

  24. Luiz Waldwogel, “Encerramento do Ano Letivo no Colégio Adventista Brasileiro” [Closing of the School Year at the Brazil College], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 38 (January 1943): 6.

  25. “A contribuição do Colégio Adventista Brasileiro à Igreja do Brasil” [The Contribution of the Brazil College to the Church in Brazil], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review] 39, no. 1, January 1944, 16.

  26. Domingos Peixoto da Silva, “O Colégio Adventista Brasileiro” [Brazil College], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 37 (November 1942): 15.

  27. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 19-23.

  28. Ibid., 19, 22.

  29. “Novos cursos no CAB” [New courses in CAB], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 12, year 50, December 1955, 24.

  30. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 23; Elder Hosokawa and Márcio Tonetti, “Os decanos” [The Deans], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 16-17.

  31. “Três Quadrienais” [Three Quadrennials], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, Year 56, April 1961, 25.

  32. Seventh-Day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “O que é o SALT?” [What is SALT?], accessed on July 10, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xE3wHD.

  33. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 29.

  34. Robert C. de Azevedo, “O último decreto” [The last decree], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 9, year 78 (September of 1983): 21.

  35. Ibid., 21-22.

  36. “IAE já tem novo terreno” [IAE already has a new land], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, year 78, November 1983, 21-22.

  37. Ibid., 21, 22.

  38. UNASP, “Nossa história” [Our history], accessed on December 17, 2019, https://bit.ly/3gs6Nxw.

  39. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 25-26.

  40. Ibid., 25-27.

  41. Márcio Dias Guarda, “Ensino superior,” [Higher Education], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 6, 2015, accessed on May 23, 2019, https://bit.ly/374hUtv.

  42. “Salt forma novos mestres” [Seminary graduates new masters], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 4, year 88, April 1992, 14.

  43. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 29-30.

  44. Mario Veloso, “La Historia del SALT” [SALT History] (Unpublished document, 2016), 22.

  45. Renato Stencel e William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 27.

  46. Renato Stencel and Willian Edward Timm, Linha do tempo: fatos que marcaram a história da faculdade adventista de Teologia do Unasp” [Timeline: Facts That Marked the History of Unasp’s Adventist School of Theology], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], Commemorative Edition (December 2019): 9, 31.

  47. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 27-28.

  48. Suzaeny Lima, “Curso de Teologia do Unasp recebe nota máxima em avaliação do MEC” [Unasp Theology Course Receives Top Grade in MEC Evaluation], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], March 7, 2016, accessed on July 8, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Lgq6iz.

  49. Renato Stencel and Willian Edward Timm, Linha do tempo: fatos que marcaram a história da faculdade Adventista de Teologia do Unasp” [Timeline: Facts That Marked the History of Unasp’s Adventist School of Theology], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], Commemorative Edition (December 2019): 9.

  50. Reinaldo Siqueira, “A Missão Continua” [The Mission Continues], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], Commemorative Edition (December 2019): 2.

  51. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37.

  52. Adilson Carlos Nunes, “Instituto Adventista de Ensino: sua fundação e desenvolvimento” [Brazil College: Its Establishment and Development] (Monography, Instituto Adventista de Ensino [Brazil College], 1985): 18.

  53. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 37.

  54. Ibid., 49.

  55. Williams Costa Junior, “IAE: escola que se renova aos 70 anos” [IAE: school that renews itself at the age of 70], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1, year 80 (January 1985): 22.

  56. Emilson dos Reis, “Impacto na Comunidade” [Impact in the Community], O seminarista [The seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 19.

  57. Ibid.

  58. “A Small Group is a group of people who meet weekly under the coordination of a leader aiming for spiritual, relational and evangelistic growth, with the goal of multiplication.” Seventh-day Adventist Church (Brazil) Website, “Pequenos Grupos” [Small Groups], accessed on February 4, 2020, https://bit.ly/2NtcXj7.

  59. Gabriel Stein Servi, “Universitários ajudam refugiados na Grécia e no Líbano” [University students help refugees in Greece and Lebanon], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1319, year 112 (March 2017): 24.

  60. Fernanda Beatriz, “Inaugurado Instituto Adventista Pernambucano de Ensino” [Inaugurated Pernambuco Adventist Academy], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], February 28, 2014, accessed on September 10, 2020, https://bit.ly/2ZstwE7.

  61. Márcio Tonetti, “Escola de pastores” [School of Pastors], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 11-12.

  62. Jefferson Paradello, “Igreja vota novo reitor do Seminário Adventista Latino-Americano de Teologia” [Church votes new Latin-American Adventist Theological Seminary rector], Notícias Adventistas [Adventist News], December 22, 2015, accessed on July 8, 2019, https://bit.ly/2XQntK2.

  63. Adriani Milli and Rodrigo Silva, “Legado Teológico” [Theological Legacy], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 20-23.

  64. Mairon Hothon and Thaís Fowler, “Além da teoria” [Beyond Theory], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 54-57.

  65. Diogo Cavalcanti, “Contribuição técnica” [Technical Contribution], O Seminarista [The Seminarian], commemorative edition (December 2019): 44-45.

  66. Renato Stencel and William Edward Timm, “Histórico da Faculdade Adventista de Teologia no Brasil” [History of the Adventist School of Theology in Brazil] (Engenheiro Coelho, SP: National Center of Adventist Memory, 2015), 23-24; “Brazilian Seminary,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D.C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1917), 180; “Brazil Adventist University: Theological Seminary,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2019), 445. For a more detailed check of all administrative leaders of SALT-UNASP, see the Yearbooks from 1917 to 2019.

×

Bessa, Letícia Daniel. "Latin American Adventist Theological Seminary - UNASP Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 23, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BJ8M.

Bessa, Letícia Daniel. "Latin American Adventist Theological Seminary - UNASP Campus." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BJ8M.

Bessa, Letícia Daniel (2021, April 28). Latin American Adventist Theological Seminary - UNASP Campus. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 23, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=BJ8M.