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São Paulo Adventist Hospital facade.

Photo courtesy of São Paulo Adventist Hospital Archives.

São Paulo Adventist Hospital

By Dorival Duarte de Lima, and Adilson da Silva Vieira

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Dorival Duarte de Lima

Adilson da Silva Vieira

São Paulo Adventist Hospital (HASP) is a medical missionary institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and is part of the Adventist global health network. It operates with two units in the territory of Central Brazil Union Conference (UCB), being one unit at Rocha Pombo St., nº 49, Aclimação district, in the city of São Paulo; and the other one, the southern unit of the hospital is located at Itapecerica road, nº 5859, Capão Redondo district, also in the city of São Paulo.

HASP's mission is to promote physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being based on the same principles that guide the more than seven hundred forty Adventist health institutions around the world. Therefore, it offers assistance to its clients in most of the different medical specialties and is a reference in care and special attention that it dedicates to its patients.

Considered to be the first medical institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Brazil, HASP has 70 years of non-stop activity and operates in two units (Central and South). The central unit has 99 beds and 724 employees, 106 doctors, 60 nurses, and 558 other employees. In turn, the southern unit has 130 staff, of which 72 are doctors, 12 are nurses, and 46 serve in other functions.1

Developments That Led to the Institution’s Establishment

Shortly after Adventism arrived in Brazil, there were medical clinics only in the states of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, and Rio Grande do Sul. The first steps for the construction of a sanatorium in the city of São Paulo were taken by the administration of the South Brazil Union Conference (USB) in 1936, under the leadership of Pastor Elmer Wilcox at the time. South Brazil Union Conference was responsible for the work of the Seventh-day Adventists in the state of São Paulo.2

At first the place chosen to build the sanatorium was an area next to Brazil College (CAB), now UNASP-SP. Soon a major fund-raising campaign for the new venture was promoted by the Volunteer Missionaries (MV) ministry, now Adventist Youth (JA). The campaign spread throughout Brazil and motivated several people, even children, such as the boy Gert Bockenkamp, son of the elementary school teachers of Bom Retiro Cruzeiro, located in the state of Santa Catarina. This boy offered all the savings from his piggy bank to help build the Adventist Sanitarium.3

However, even after the successful collection, the construction of the sanatorium did not start. In addition to the political uncertainties surrounding the country, the small Brazilian medical workforce, added to the difficulty in allowing foreign doctors to work in Brazil, caused the project of this sanatorium to be interrupted.4 Some problems arising from World War II also prevented the project from being carried forward. Therefore, Brazil College was authorized to use the site intended for the construction of the new institution for cultivation. This land was situated on the highest hill of the academy, in front of the current Superbom (Brazil Manufacturing Branch). It was precisely at that time that the planning committee transferred the clinic to the direction of São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulista), current São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulistana).5

In 1939 Dr. Antonio Miranda, a physician from São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulista), was invited to establish an office called Boa Vista Clinic to assist the sanatorium campaign.6 He then rented a townhouse at Saint Joaquim St., nº 319, in the Liberdade district, which became a residence, an office, and a treatment room, and where he was assisted by nurse Bertha Lipke, who prioritized natural treatments.7 Thus, during the 1930s “most of the movement for a medical center in Brazil was concentrated in São Paulo.”8 “In 1940 Adventists in São Paulo, based on the votes that gave autonomy to each conference to set up their own health program,” began negotiating a property located near the central church.

Following a new fundraising campaign, this time led by Pastor Germano Ritter, then president of São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulista), on April 15, 1941, a mansion was purchased at 495 Tamandaré St. This manor belonged to Adélia Santos Dumont, niece of the famous father of aviation, Alberto Santos Dumont.9 Then there was an extensive reformation done with the help of a campaign with all the state churches. In this campaign, in just 2 months, 25 thousand copies of Life and Health review were sold.10

In addition to these sources of subsidies, there were resources from donations, such as the help of Sister Ana Garcia-who donated to São Paulo clinic her carpets, curtains, and some furniture that were missing for the institution to start functioning.11 Still other sources came from the South Brazil Union Conference funds, the South American Division, and even the General Conference.12 As Pastor Ritter said at the inauguration of the institution, the success of the sanatorium project in São Paulo cost “a lot of work, a lot of sacrifice, and tears.”13

Founding of the Institution

On March 8, 1942, the São Paulo Clinic (CSL; now known as São Paulo Adventist Hospital) was inaugurated at 495 Tamandaré St., in the city of São Paulo.14 The inauguration was attended by the then state governor, Adhemar Pereira de Barros; his wife, Leonor Mendes de Barros; Mr. Eurico Branco; Dr. Galdino Nunes Vieira, appointed clinical director of the hospital; Pastor Rodolfo Belz, South Brazil Union Conference's president; and Pastor Germano Ritter, president of the São Paulo Conference (Associação Paulista).15 The hospital's team of leaders still counted on the managing director Fernando Luz and head dean Frieda Trefz.

During the event, those present visited each part of the building, which consisted of an operating and sterilization room, hydro and electrotherapy equipment, with modern equipment for the application of Scottish showers, diathermy, ultraviolet and infrared rays, light and steam baths, et cetera. It is noteworthy that the hospital was built “to serve a special purpose, pointing out to the people of our land how to find a cure of their physical suffering along with the cure for the ills of the soul.” Thereafter, the patients looking for the new institution could be treated according to the biblical health principles taught by the SDAs.16

The hospital was founded as a philanthropic institution and having to reinvest its positive results in the institution itself, which was committed to provide free medical care wherever possible.17 However, the financial results were seen at the end of the first year of work. After 12 months of work, CSL made around $1,500.18 On the occasion of the founding of the CSL, the Adventist medical missionary work took one of the most important steps toward its definitive implantation as hospital-medical work in Brazil and South America. As one of its differentials, CSL began to offer treatment for a condition that plagued part of the Brazilian families-Polio.

History of the Institution

In its first phase of operation, CSL stood out especially for offering natural treatments. Many children with polio underwent physiotherapy treatments offered by the hospital and obtained excellent results. Thus, the Adventist medical missionary work was steadily increasing in the public opinion.19

In the early days of CSL, many families from São Paulo were struck by the occurrence of polio-a highly contagious infection that causes permanent paralysis and can lead to death. At this time the institution gained prominence in the society for developing a treatment for polio and for the sequelae of the disease-a method that was primarily based on hydrotherapy.20

Hydrotherapy at the CSL was specialized in the Herkenny method (or Kenny method), which consisted of applying hot and humid compresses on children diagnosed with polio in the pain phase and/or after undergoing underwater physiotherapy to rehabilitate the muscles. The results were so evident that the hospital was able to treat more than one hundred children with polio daily.21

In the following years, CSL underwent an improvement process in the medical field, as well as in its facilities. Between 1963 and 1964, the institution created the Health Insurance Plan called Garantia de Saúde,22 which became a source of funds and allowed an effective proximity through more frequent care to a larger number of people. With the sales of the new health plan, the hospital was able to make several necessary improvements.23

It was in 1973 when it was linked to São Paulo Conference (Associção Paulista), that CSL took the name of Hospital Adventista de São Paulo (São Paulo Adventist Hospital) (HASP). At that time a bold improvement project was drawn up, with the construction of a building with rooms and apartments for patients, a surgical center, an intensive care unit, and other complementary units.24 Some of the equipment that made up these new facilities was imported and represented the very latest equipment. So, by the end of 1975 some of these gadgets were still arriving.25 And the improvements didn't stop there.

Changes in HASP facilities continued to occur due to the need for the hospital to increase and improve its structure to meet the patient demand. In early 1976 another wing of apartments incorporated the HASP. However, the institution's leaders decided that a modern operating room with larger recovery rooms was still missing, as well as new equipment and a full physiotherapy service. This measure was urgently taken since it had to be finished by the end of that year.26

The expansion of HASP was welcomed by all people, even by the institution's employees. This is because the growth of the hospital provided a higher quality of services. In addition, such improvements provided personal benefits to most servers-such as mothers who worked in the hospital and had no one to leave their children with. As from the changes made to the hospital structure, HASP also began activities of a day-care center, where employees could leave their children while they worked.27

Later, in 1979, a group of medical workers, pastors, nutritionists, and nurses began to meet from time to time at HASP to research subjects about Medical Missionary Work in accordance with the guidance of the Spirit of Prophecy. The group's basic idea was to go back to the origins of the Adventist medical institution because for more than 100 years Adventist hospitals were known worldwide for their hydrotherapy treatments.28 Recalling that the results of the Herkenny method were very evident, questionings about the end of this treatment in HASP soon came up.

In order to settle the questioning, the group in question studied books on natural treatments found in an old HASP library. In addition, the group used the experience of Pastor Biazzi, who worked in Paraná, as a reference, as he helped many people by giving dietary advice and offering natural treatments. This was all taken into account, as was a thorough review of Ellen White's bibliographies on the subject. With these ideas in mind, the team suggested some changes such as the development of better conditions to perform natural treatments in the HASP itself and the founding of a clinic specialized in these procedures out of town.

In September 1980, a great miracle experienced by the HASP team stood out among all the achievements the hospital had reached so far. This happened when Lilian de Oliveira, two and a half years old, was admitted to the hospital after taking a 10-foot fall that fractured her skull. Lilian arrived at the hospital unconscious and then began to have a seizure, vomited 43 times, and had some cardiac arrests. Her condition was so severe that it was making her parents and doctors more distressed by the minute. Since it was Friday, they asked for prayers in nearly thirty Adventist churches in the area. The members of these churches would meet the next day to pray for the girl.29

Still on Friday, after some pastors went to the hospital to anoint the child, she gave signs of improvement, but to no avail. The next day was critical. Lilian's case was so despairing that her parents were already thinking about how to dress her at her funeral. Unable to do a more accurate image exam, the doctors decided to have an emergency surgery to remove the blood clots from the girl's head. Distressed, but with faith, her parents intensified their prayers until they noticed a picture with an illustration of Christ beside a sick person's bed. This painting was displayed in front of each room of the hospital. Then they asked God to make this image a reality in Lilian's room too.30

Lilian's surgery began at 5:00 p.m. that Saturday. To the doctors' surprise, there was no blood clot, only the edema that had deformed the child's head. She survived the procedure and had no sequelae even years after what happened. On Wednesday of the following week, when the girl was able to open her eyes, she noticed the picture in front of her room and said, “Mama, this Jesus held me in his arms.”31

Later, on December 8, 1980, the plan to build a new clinic for natural treatments began to be carried out. On that date property was acquired where services based on natural programs would be provided. It was understood that this would provide better conditions for treating patients. Therefore, the opening of the clinic, named São Roque Clinic, current Adventist Natural Life Clinic, took place on December 14.32 Although it was the result of HASP's work, this clinic has gone its own way in terms of projects.

Meanwhile, HASP kept trying to adapt its facilities to the growing demands of its patients. In the 1990s the hospital's structure and services were much more evolved comparing to its beginnings. HASP was already a building with six floors and approximately forty beds, operating room, maternity ward, nursery, wings of medical and surgical clinics. There were 19 doctors, and eight of them were workers. In addition to these, HASP had about fifty specialists who provided services. It had already reached 270 employees, most of whom were Adventists. In turn, the hospital's chaplaincy service also functioned more efficiently, with a team of Bible workers on staff who could accompany patients after they were discharged.33

During this period the sector that received prominence was the maternity. This sector stood out even in reports from various Brazilian media. On one occasion, HASP's maternity hospital came to be considered as “one of the best maternity hospitals in the state of São Paulo.” This was, among other things, due to a method used and disseminated by the hospital years earlier: the practice of leaving the baby with the mother as soon as the baby was born. Doctors of HASP used to do it, believing that babies were stimulated to breastfeed while their mothers received better guidance.34

After a rapid growth, HASP began to have functional and technological problems. The difficulties were so great that its leaders considered it to be “in ICU.” Measures were immediately taken by the board, which appointed a new board in late 1998. The new leaders had a great responsibility: to present within 60 days a strategic plan to reverse HASP's situation. They accepted the challenge promptly.35

Then, on November 11, 1998, the new board presented the “Premises Document for the Years 1999-2003.” It contained 80 percent employee-based planning established at Florida Hospital–an Adventist institution located in the city of Orlando, in the United States. From then on the offer of new services, as well as the expansion of a physical space and the improvement of the quality of care, served to make HASP definitely a leading hospital.36 After the emergency measure was taken, one of the first results was the opening of a medical center located in the south Zone of São Paulo, which started to work with at least 10 professionals from various medical specialties.37

Back to the main unit, in 2011 HASP opened a new surgical center, a new ICU, a diagnostic imaging center, and a clinical analysis laboratory. The new ICU had nine beds, each with state-of-the-art monitoring cameras, respirators, and heart monitors. Of these, two are isolation beds with centralized multiparameter monitoring systems. The new surgical center already had the most modern equipment of the time, providing security to the surgical team and meeting the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) through the "Safe Surgery Program." In this period HASP was already providing care over 25 different health plans.38

To expand the assistance of the Adventist medical work in the far south zone of São Paulo, the creation of a new HASP unit was planned. The chosen location was land owned by UNASP-SP, in front of Itapecerica Road, in the Capão Redondo district. Just as the land, other resources for the venture, such as consulting for various construction-related matters, were provided by UNASP-SP. The construction began in February 2013. More financial investments came from the South São Paulo Conference (headquartered in Capão Redondo), from HASP itself, and from the Central Brazil Union Conference, which at that time had already started managing the Adventist work in the state of São Paulo.

As a result, communities surrounding the new hospital unit-Adventists and non-Adventists-have gained the facility of a broader assistance resource, located in the "backyard" of UNASP-SP. Considering the level of a traffic jam in a city with a chaotic traffic like São Paulo, to find assistance close to where one lives and not having to commute is a great advantage. In addition, the construction of the new headquarters facilitated the service to UNASP-SP students and employees who are insured by any health plan accepted at HASP.

The inauguration of the new unit took place on October 30, 2013. That year HASP gained 1,800 m² of built area on UNASP's São Paulo campus. The unit had 14 clinics, clinical analysis laboratory, and imaging exams, as well as full emergency care. During the ceremony two people were baptized-a doctor and his wife-who met the Seventh-day Adventists when the husband was admitted to HASP a few months earlier.39

Currently, the southern unit of the HASP has 16 medical offices, a clinical analysis laboratory, and diagnostic imaging tests and prompt comprehensive care, offering up to 30 specialties.40 About 30 doctors and 70 other health professionals work for the unit. The emergency room started providing medical services for adults, children, and orthopaedics, offering 24-hour assistance to an average of seven thousand patients a month. 41

In 2015 Dr. Dorival Duarte, clinical director of HASP since 2007, founded with a medical team (Dr. Adney Fecury, Dr. Ieda Domiciano, Dr. Valter Felau, Dr. Daniela Kano, Dr. Luiz Fernando Sella, Dr. Sonia de Duarte, Dr. Dorival Duarte Jr.) the Adventist Medical Association, the first of Seventh-day Adventists with a legal and registered status. Since then this association has stood out as a forum for integration among Adventist physicians, contributing to the solidification of the biblical principles of health outlined by the Spirit of Prophecy, as revealed in the works of Ellen White. At the same time, the group works to empower professionals to be missionaries par excellence, bringing the love of Christ to open people's hearts to the gospel. Later, in 2019, the association held its fifth National Congress, with more than two hundred doctors from all over Brazil.42

One of the acknowledgments of all the efforts applied by HASP happened on February 7, 2019, when the Brazilian Institute of Health Excellence (Ibes) considered the hospital as a “reference in the care and special attention dedicated to its patients.”43 To symbolize such recognition, HASP received a Level 1 National Accreditation Organization (ONA) seal certificate, which is only granted to institutions that meet all patient safety requirements.44

This and other awards represent the engagement of all employees in the HASP mission. With divine guidance, they seek to do their work faithfully. Such responsibility goes through all sectors, be it security, hospitality, kitchen, or doctor. Everyone understands that while taking care of the patients' health, the institution has the opportunity to preach to them.

Historical Role of the Institution

The existence of HASP contributed significantly to the Adventist nursing service in Brazil. This work began in 1942 when Dr. Galdino Nunes Vieira founded the hospital-as São Paulo Clinic Hospital-inviting nurse Frieda Trefz, who until then worked in Argentina, to come and start the hospital activities. It was she who suggested the creation of a nursing school.45

On this occasion, the South Brazil Union Conference thought of building a nursing school in Brazil College. A building was built, but in virtue of the financial difficulties and lack of professors, the project didn’t go through.46 As a solution, Dr. Galdino made an agreement with the São Paulo Red Cross so that Adventist students could study there. Most of the classes were taught by doctors at the health center until 1945, when the first Brazilian class of Adventist nurses graduated. All together there were six nurses, five females and one male nurse, namely: Heloísa Waldvogel, Virgilina Maia Matos, Orsina de Carvalho, Orlando and Vilma Fabre, and Maria Kudzielcz. Except for the Fabre couple, everyone else worked at HASP.47

Currently, the institution has a partnership with UNASP-SP and the city of São Paulo-a relationship that began in 2016 with the Polyclinic University. Because it is a philanthropic institution, in this place HASP provides free care in different areas. In addition, HASP also supports nonreligious institutions. Since 2013, for example, the hospital has been a great ally of the Projeto Orelhinha (Little Ear Project).48 Founded in 2010, this project works to “enable patients’ access to otoplasty (surgery for the correction of protruding ears,” bringing specialized professionals in the field who provide the procedure with a minimum fee to the patient, besides facilitating payment.49

Overview

With the mission of promoting physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being, following the example of Jesus, HASP offers about forty medical services in the most diverse specialties. The aim is to reach as many people as possible through the services provided.50 Today the hospital has a considerable structure. Composed of an oncological center; 4 operating rooms with capacity for low and high complexity procedures in all medical specialties; 18 adult ICU beds; 2 medical and diagnostic centers; 1 cardiac center; 1 diagnostic center with experienced and highly qualified staff to provide efficient and humanized care; and 1 laboratory for clinical and pathological analysis.

HASP's diagnostic imaging sector can provide a quality reliable service, with several technologies, including conventional and interventional radiology, ultrasound, computed tomography, and bone densitometry. This sector also performs cardiac examinations, such as: exercise test, holter system, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and M.A.P.A. (Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring).

During its nearly eighty years of existence and much learning, the hospital has undergone growth processes to reach the level that it is at today. Over the past two years, with extensive financial support from the Central Brazil Union Conference, the hospital has revitalized a five-story building with patient apartments, 34 inpatient beds, an oncology service, and a new nine-bed ICU for adult patients and 10 to the paediatric ward.51 In addition to investments in the physical structure, the institution continues to seek greater credibility through the training of its employees.

In the last 10 years, the hospital has shown a strong increase in the number of appointments, hospitalizations, and surgeries. The number of appointments increased by almost 200 percent, from 56,443 in 2013 to 165,156 in 2018. Still in 2018, the number of hospitalizations reached 3,972, while 4,704 was the number of surgeries. All these numbers represent the fact that thousands of people have heard of Jesus through the hospital. “Talking about Jesus to people, reaching out to their doubts,” as well as “encouraging people to have a relationship with God,” are common practices at the HASP. There is nothing more important to the hospital than following its motto: "Save is our nature!”52

Name List

São Paulo Clinic and Hospital (1942-1959); São Paulo Hospital (1960-1968); Hospital Adventista Liberdade (São Paulo Adventist Hospital) (1969-1973); Hospital Adventista de São Paulo (São Paulo Adventist Hospital) (1973-current).53

List of Leaders 54

Clinical Directors: Galdino Nunes Vieira (1942-1949); Carlos F. Schwantes (1949-1953); Antonio A. Miranda (1953, 1954); Ajax W. Silveira (1954, 1955); Geraldo Leitkze (1955-1963); Bruno O. Bergold (1963-1966); Oswaldo Teixeira (1967-1970); Artur Oberg (1971, 1972); Manfred Krusche (1972, 1973); Natanael A. da Costa (1973-1978); Manfred A. Krusche (1979, 1980); Natanael A. da Costa (1981-1985); Manfred A. Krusche (1986); Rene Gross (1986-1990); Manfred Krusche (1990-1995); Daniel Duarte de Lima (1995-1997); Pedro M. de Carvalho (1997, 1998); Natanael A. da Costa (1998-2006); Octávio A. Koch (2006); Dorival Duarte de Lima (2007-current).

Administrative Directors: Fernando Luz (1942-1950); Oscar Castellani (1950); C. F. Schwantes (1951-1953); Antonio A. Miranda (1953, 1954); J. J. Oliveira (1954, 1955); Siegfried Genske (1955-1961); J. F. Waiting (1961-1963); P. D. Pinto (1963-1969); R. S. Ferreira (1969-1972); J. T. Araújo (1972, 1973); Osvaldino Bomfim (19731976); S. P. Baia (1976-1979); Joao Lotze (1979-1984); Edson H. da Silva Jr. (1984, 1985); Antonio A. Lovizio (1986-1993); Oseias Pereira (1993-1995); Elizabeth Santeli (1995-1998); Wilson J. de Andrade (1998-2008); Sergio Fernandes dos Reis (2009-2014); Rafael Francisco de Almeida (2014-current).55

Sources

Ambrosio, Antônio Roberto. “Adventist Natural Life Clinic.” Monography, Brazil College, 1986.

“Atendimento ampliado” [Extended service], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 12, 1997.

Bezerra, John. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital.” Monography: Brazil College, May 1990.

Britis, Charles A. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital and the Medical-missionary Work.” Monography, Brazil College, May 1990.

“Clínica Adventista Vida Natural completa 30 anos” [Adventist Natural Life Clinic turned 30]. Portal guia-me [Guide me Portal] (Online), December 16, 2010.

Correa, Teodoro Ninahuaman. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital.” Monography: Brazil College, June 1984.

Adventist Encyclopedia Memory Website in Brazil. https://bit.ly/2LgVGM2.

Greenleaf, Floyd. A Land of Hope. Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011.

“Hospital Adventista de São Paulo comemora Certificação Nível 1 da ONA” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital celebrates ONA’s Level 1 Certification]. IBES (Online), February 21, 2019.

“Hospital Adventista inaugura centro médico” [Adventist Hospital opens medical center]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 2000.

HASP São Paulo, “Institucional 2012. Hospital Adventista de São Paulo, 70 anos de história!” [Institutional 2012. São Paulo Adventist Hospital, 70 years of history] (institutional video of the 70 years of HASP’s history, October 31, 2012), accessed on July 3, 2019.

Lira, Elizeu C. “Hospital Adventista São Paulo: era busca do ideal” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital: pursuing the ideal]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1992.

Lotze, João. “Notícias do HASP” [HASP News]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 1976.

Lotze, João. “Notícias do HASP” [HASP News]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1975.

“Meta louvável” [Praiseworthy Goal]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 1998.

Nogueira, Helga. “Mulher de valor” [Woman of Value]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1997.

“Nova diretoria do HASP” [HASP’s new management]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1998.

“Nova unidade do HASP” [HASP’s new unit]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 2013.

“O evangelho aos judeus” [The Gospel to the Jews]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 3, 1999.

Oliveira, Rosilda Silva de. “Deus Salvou Nossa Filha” [God Saved Our Daugther]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], August 1982.

Little Ear Project, posting in the Facebook page of the Little Ear Project, June 29, 2019.

Little Ear Project. https://www.projetoorelhinhaemacao.com/.

“Rápidas” [Quick News]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1979.

Ritter, Germano G. “A Obra Médico-Missionária” [The Medical-Missionary Work]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1941.

Ritter, Germano G. “Coluna Paulista” [São Paulo Column]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1941.

Ritter, Germano G. “Coluna Paulista” [São Paulo Column], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1941.

Schmitt, Isadora. “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo recebe certificação de qualidade” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital gets a quality Certification]. Adventist News (Online), February 12, 2019.

Schwantes, Arno, “Inauguração da Casa de Saúde Liberdade” [“Opening of the São Paulo Clinic Hospital”]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1942.

Serpa, Orlando F. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital” Monography: Brazil College, n.d.

Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia. Hagerstwon, MD: Review and Herald, 1996. S.v. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital.”

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018.

Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook. Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association. Various years.

Total MedCare. https://www.totalmedcare.com.br/.

Unasp São Paulo, “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo inaugura unidade no Unasp SP” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital opens unit in Unasp SP]. Video containing a report made on the day the new unit was opened, December 12, 2013.

Vieira, Galdino Nunes. Sonhos sonhados realidades vividas [Dreamt dreams lived realities]. Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1983.

Notes

  1. Personal knowledge of the author, Dr. Dorival, as the clinical director of the institution.

  2. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 395.

  3. Personal knowledge, one of the authors (Dr. Dorival) is the clinical director of the institution.

  4. Ibid., 396, 456.

  5. John Bezerra, “São Paulo Adventist Hospital” (Monography: Brazil College, May 1990), 2.

  6. Ibid., 397.

  7. Don F. Neufeld, ed., “São Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (United States: Review and Herald, 1996), 543.

  8. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 456.

  9. Ibid; Germano G. Ritter, “Coluna Paulista” [São Paulo Column], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1941, 12.

  10. Ibid; Germano G. Ritter, “Coluna Paulista” [São Paulo Column], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], June 1941, 12; Germano G. Ritter, “A Obra Médico-Missionária” [The Medical-Missionary Work], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], July 1941, 11; Germano G. Ritter, “Coluna Paulista” [São Paulo Column], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], September 1941, 13.

  11. Helga Nogueira, “Mulher de valor” [Woman of Value], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], February 1997, 11.

  12. Orlando F. Serpa, “São Paulo Adventist Hospital” (Monography: Brazil College, n.d.), 3-4.

  13. Arno Schwantes, “Inauguração da Casa de Saúde Liberdade” [Opening of the São Paulo Clinic and Hospital], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1942, 12, 21.

  14. The acquired property was located at the corner of Tamandaré St. and Rocha Pombo St. After undergoing several extensions, HASP changed its main entrance to Rocha Pombo St., no. 49, and since 2007, it became its official address.

  15. Arno Schwantes, “Inauguração da Casa de Saúde Liberdade” [Opening of the São Paulo Clinic Hospital], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1942, 12, 21.

  16. Ibid.

  17. Teodoro Ninahuaman Correa, “São Paulo Adventist Hospital” (Monography: Brazil College, June 1984), 6.

  18. Don F. Neufeld, ed., “São Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (United States: Review and Herald, 1996), 543.

  19. Floyd Greenleaf, Terra de Esperança [A Land of Hope] (Tatuí, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 2011), 577.

  20. Galdino Nunes Vieira, Sonhos sonhados realidades vividas [Dreamt dreams lived realities] (Santo André, SP: Brazil Publishing House, 1983), 151-152

  21. Ibid.

  22. In 2007, a new building was opened at Rocha Pombo St., right in front of the HASP building, with a new Medical and Diagnostic Center, administration offices, Health Insurance Plan (currently called Total MedCare) and other facilities. To know more about this plan, check: https://www.totalmedcare.com.br/.

  23. Enciclopédia da Memória Adventista no Brasil [Encyclopedia of the Adventist Memory in Brazil], accessed on July 3, 2019, https://bit.ly/2NBZUke.

  24. John Bezerra, “São Paulo Adventist Hospital” (Monography: Brazil College, May 1990), 3.

  25. João Lotze, “Notícias do HASP” [HASP News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], (October 1975, 16.

  26. João Lotze, “Notícias do HASP” [HASP News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], May 5, 16.

  27. João Lotze, “Notícias do HASP” [HASP News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1975, 16.

  28. “Rápidas” [Quick News], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], October 1979, 23.

  29. Rosilda Silva de Oliveira, “Deus Salvou Nossa Filha” [God Saved Our Daugther], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 8 (August 1982): 44.

  30. Ibid.

  31. Ibid.

  32. Antônio Roberto Ambrosio, “Clínica Adventista de São Roque” [São Roque Clinic] (Monography, Brazil College, 1986), 5; “Clínica Adventista Vida Natural completa 30 anos” [Adventist Natural Life Clinic turned 30], Portal guia-me [Guide me Portal] (Online), December 16, 2010, accessed on September 3, 2018, https://goo.gl/V2fbam.

  33. Elizeu C. Lira, “Hospital Adventista São Paulo: era busca do ideal” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital: pursuing the ideal], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1992, 10-11; Charles A. Britis, “São Paulo Adventist Hospital and the Medical-missionary Work” (Monography, Brazil College, May 1990) 18.

  34. Elizeu C. Lira, “Hospital Adventista São Paulo: era busca do ideal” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital: pursuing the ideal], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], April 1992, 11.

  35. “Nova diretoria do HASP” [HASP’s new management], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], November 1998. 17; “Meta louvável” [Praiseworthy Goal], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 12, 1998, 20.

  36. “Meta louvável” [Praiseworthy Goal], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], December 12, 1998, 20.

  37. “Hospital Adventista inaugura centro médico” [Adventist Hospital opens medical center]. Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], March 2000, 20.

  38. HASP São Paulo, “Institucional 2012. Hospital Adventista de São Paulo, 70 anos de história!” [Institutional 2012. São Paulo Adventist Hospital, 70 years of history] (institutional video of the 70 years of HASP’s history, October 31, 2012), accessed on July 3, 2019, https://youtu.be/ZK0iUU9bSVo.

  39. Unasp São Paulo, “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo inaugura unidade no Unasp SP” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital opens unit in Unasp SP] (video containing a report made on the day the new unit was opened, December 12, 2013), accessed on July 3, 2019, https://youtu.be/nUUH9t2dM2A.

  40. Medical specialties offered include general practice, pediatrics, orthopedics, urology, gynecology, dermatology, cardiology, psychiatry, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and psychology.

  41. Helio Carnassale (former general director of UNASP SP), email message to Luvercy Ferreira, February 17, 2019; Rafael Francisco de Almeida (administrative director of HASP), email message to Luvercy Ferreira, February 18, 2019; “Nova unidade do HASP” [HASP’s new unit], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 1267, December 2013, 30.

  42. Personal knowledge, one of the authors (Dr. Dorival) is the clinical director of the institution.

  43. “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo comemora Certificação Nível 1 da ONA” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital celebrates ONA’s Level 1 Certification]. IBES (Online), February 21, 2019, accessed on July 4, 2019, https://bit.ly/2Xr4FBM.

  44. Isadora Schmitt, “Hospital Adventista de São Paulo recebe certificação de qualidade” [São Paulo Adventist Hospital gets a quality Certification], Adventist News, February 12, 2019, accessed on July 4, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xFaTPf.

  45. Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (1996), s.v. “São Paulo Adventist Hospital.”

  46. Ibid.

  47. Changes in teaching laws and government requirements for the operation of a nursing school, combined with other obstacles, made Adventist nursing, as a school institution in Brazil, discontinued in 1945.

  48. Little Ear Project, posting in the Facebook page of the Little Ear Project, June 29, 2019 (22:39), accessed on June 03, 2019, https://bit.ly/2xww6ui.

  49. To know more about the Little Ear Project, check: https://www.projetoorelhinhaemacao.com/.

  50. The offered specialties are: allergology, pathological anatomy, anesthesiology, angiology, buccomaxillofacial surgery, surgical clinic, clinical and diagnostic cardiology, head and neck surgery, plastic surgery of the hand and microsurgery, bariatric surgery, general surgery, plastic surgery, video surgery laparoscopy, general practice, clinical and surgical dermatology, endocrinology, speech therapy, clinical and surgical gastroenterology, geriatrics, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, hepatology, immunology, infectology, clinical and surgical mastology, nephrology, clinical neurology, neurosurgery, nutrition, clinical and surgical ophthalmology, clinical and surgical oncology, orthopedics and traumatology, otolaryngology, pediatrics, psychology, psychiatry, rheumatology, urology, and vascular surgery.

  51. São Paulo Adventist Hospital, Institutional video on Facebook page. April 22, 2019 (16:15), accessed on July 5, 2019, https://www.facebook.com/hospitaladventistasp/videos/410023613119019/.

  52. Ibid.

  53. “Sao Paulo Clinic,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1942), 280; “Sao Paulo Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1961), 304; “Sao Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1970), 407; “Sao Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1975), 394.

  54. Don F. Neufeld, ed., “São Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia (United States: Review and Herald, 1996), 543; “Nova diretoria do HASP” [HASP’s new management], Revista Adventista [Adventist Review], no. 11, novembro de 1998, 17; São Paulo Clinic,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Washington, D. C.: Review and Herald Publishing Association, 1942), 280; “São Paulo Adventist Hospital,” Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook (Nampa, ID.: Pacific Press Publishing Association, 2018), 608.

  55. For more information check the Web site: http://hasp.org.br/. Visit the social media: Facebook-@hospitaladventistasp; Twitter-@HospitalAdvent; Youtube-http://www.youtube.com/HospitalAdvent .

×

Lima, Dorival Duarte de, Adilson da Silva Vieira. "São Paulo Adventist Hospital." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Accessed September 21, 2021. https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGJ5.

Lima, Dorival Duarte de, Adilson da Silva Vieira. "São Paulo Adventist Hospital." Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. April 28, 2021. Date of access September 21, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGJ5.

Lima, Dorival Duarte de, Adilson da Silva Vieira (2021, April 28). São Paulo Adventist Hospital. Encyclopedia of Seventh-day Adventists. Retrieved September 21, 2021, https://encyclopedia.adventist.org/article?id=CGJ5.