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Showing 21 – 27 of 27

​Dores Alanzo Robinson was an evangelist, educator, and administrator who served in South Africa, England, and India during the early period of Seventh-day Adventist world mission.

Wells Allen Ruble was a physician, college professor, college president, medical and health administrator, and medical superintendent.

Richard William Schwarz was a history professor, author, and educational administrator.

Before 1922, the state of New York was divided into three Adventist conferences: the Greater New York Conference (1902- ), which encompassed the metropolitan New York City area; the Western New York Conference (1906-1922), which operated a secondary school near Salamanca successively called the Tunesassa School (1906-1907), Tunesassa Intermediate School (1907-1913), Fernwood Intermediate School (1913-1917), and Fernwood Academy (1917-1921); and the Eastern New York Conference (1906-1922), which operated Clinton Academy for one year (1920-1921).

Emmett Kaiser Vande Vere was a historian, author, educational administrator, history professor, historical consultant to university presidents, and promoter of the narrative interpretation of Adventist history.

​Luther Willis Warren, evangelist and youth ministries innovator, influenced the lives of thousands of young people in schools and churches where he conducted revivals. He created organizations such as the Sunshine Bands, Junior and Senior Missionary Volunteer societies, church schools, and orphanages.

​William Byington White’s primary contribution to the Seventh-day Adventist Church lies in his thirty-three years (1887-1920) of service as a president of four conferences (South Dakota, Nebraska, Indiana, and Montana) and four union conferences (Pacific, North Pacific, Atlantic, and South African).