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Showing 1 – 12 of 12

​The East Denmark Conference was a former unit of church organization under the West Nordic Union Conference in the Northern European Division, covering the territory of East Denmark and the Faroe Islands.

Carl Christian Hansen, Sr. (better known as C. C. Hansen) played an important part in the early years of the Seventh-day Adventist church in Denmark and gave of his time, effort and means to support the cause that he loved. He had a special interest in literature work and the health message, and worked as an evangelist, teacher and business administrator.

​In his service for the Seventh-day Adventist Church, Thorvald Kristensen inspired a number of people and left his appreciable impression on the work of the Church in Denmark and West Africa. He worked as Bible teacher, evangelist, pastor, administrator, missionary, and editor. By his side was his faithful wife, Irene, with her pleasant attitude and dignified manners.

Emanuel W. Pedersen lived on four continents and in six different countries while serving at all levels of the Adventist Church organization from colporteur, teacher, and pastor in his homeland to general field secretary at the General Conference. In his lifetime of more than 100 years, he saw his Church grow from fewer than 100,000 members to more than 13 million.

​Julius Christensen Raft was a Danish pastor, evangelist, and administrator. He served as president of the Danish Conference, from 1906 to 1908, and the Scandinavian Union, from 1908 to 1922. He was a field secretary in the European Division from 1922 to 1928, and a field secretary of the Southern European Division until 1932. For many years he was chairman of the Scandinavian Philanthropic Society and owner of Skodsborg Sanitarium, which grew to be the largest health institution within the Adventist Church during his time.

Known as the friend of the youth, Steen Rasmussen played a major role in developing the youth work of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, first in Scandinavia and later in the rest of Europe. As an energetic person with organizational skills and a winning disposition, he served as the head of the Home Missionary Department of the General Conference.

Sine Renlev was Denmark’s first female Seventh-day Adventist preacher. With her pleasant personality, her guitar, and her beautiful singing voice, she drew large numbers to her Bible lectures in public halls, tents, or the homes of interested people. Having become a Seventh-day Adventist in 1879, she almost immediately set out to preach the present truth, and no one could stop her sharing her newfound faith.

​Børge Schantz’s denominational service included pastoral work, church administration, teaching, and lecturing at colleges and universities. He set up a global center for Islamic Studies and taught Adventist-Muslim relations. He wrote books and articles that had worldwide readership.

​Skodsborg Badesanatorium (Skodsborg Sanatorium) is a pioneer Seventh-day Adventist medical institution at Skodsborg, a suburb of Copenhagen, Denmark. It was originally owned and operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and stood as a model and inspiration for other sanitariums and hospitals in Northern Europe. The institution is still being operated as a health resort under the name Kurhotel Skodsborg, but it no longer belongs to Seventh-day Adventists.

Pioneer Seventh-day Adventist missionary V. E. Toppenberg worked 43 years in the countries of Tanganyika, Ethiopia, Uganda, and Eritrea.

As an evangelist, Bible teacher, administrator, and editor, Axel Varmer played a key role in leading people to Christ, training young people, and building up the Seventh-day Adventist church in Denmark. His book, I Skyggen af Store Begivenheder (In the Shadow of Great Events), was widely sold during the World War II years and was instrumental in preparing the way for evangelism in many communities. In his later years he served the church at division level and as a missionary in Africa.

In 1890 M. M. Olsen and his wife were called home to Denmark, from the United States, and assigned to establish a school in Copenhagen, together with Carl Ottosen, who later established Skodsborg Sanatorium.