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​The Adventist Health Education Foundation (AHEF) is a vegetarian food factory operated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Matariah, the heart of Cairo, Egypt. Founded in 1976, it continues to function as of this writing (2019).

Adventist School Bouchrieh (ASB) is a coeducational day school operated by the East Mediterranean Region of the Middle East and North Africa Union Mission. Following the education ideals of the Seventh-day Adventist church, it offers four levels of education (kindergarten to secondary) and is accredited by the Lebanese Ministry of Education.

Adventist School Mouseitbeh (ASM) is a coeducational day school operated by the East Mediterranean Region of the Middle East and North Africa Union Mission. Following the educational ideals of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, it offers four levels of education (kindergarten to secondary) and is accredited by the Lebanese Ministry of Education.

The Afro-Mideast Division was a large unit of church organization in the Middle East and eastern Africa that existed from 1970 to 1981.

Afro-Mideast Division Impact was a periodical that served as the official organ of the Afro-Mideast Division from 1971 to 1981.

The Arabic Union Mission of Seventh-day Adventists had a brief 17-year history (1927-1944).

Bahrain, officially Kingdom of Bahrain, is an island nation in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf. The earliest record indicates the first Seventh-day Adventists arrived in Bahrain in 1955, when the British government recruited qualified medical personal from India to maintain adequate hospitals in the Persian Gulf. The members were mostly nurses, and, although the Middle East Division officers corresponded with them, the first visit of church officials was made to Bahrain in April 1963.

Romualdo Bertola was a pioneering Italian evangelist in the late 1800s.

In 1899 Ida Schlegel, a nurse who was trained at the Adventist Sanitarium in Basel, Switzerland, was sent as a missionary nurse to Cairo, Egypt, along with Louis Passebois and his wife, who were also trained nurses.

The Dar El Salam Hospital was an 85-bed medical facility in Baghdad, Iraq, sponsored by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. It operated from 1946 to June 1959.

​Egypt is a republic situated on the northeast corner of Africa and the southwest corner of Asia. It is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on the north and the Red Sea on the east. Egypt shares long land borders with Sudan to the south and Libya to the west and also connects to the Gaza Strip and Israel in the northeast.

​Aida Ghazal Farah was an educator, Bible worker, college dean of women, church musician, and youth leader in Lebanon.

Salam Fargo, sister of the first pioneer layman in Iraq, served as a home missionary in her country of Iraq.

Iran was first entered by Seventh-day Adventists in 1911, when Frank F. Oster and Henry Dirksen (both Americans) went there from Germany and settled in Rezayeh (Urmia) in northwestern Iran near the Turkish border. There they worked among the many Armenian and Nestorian Christians living in the area.

​The modern Republic of Iraq occupies most of the region the ancient Greeks called Mesopotamia, the “Land between Rivers,” referring to the Euphrates and Tigris river valleys and the plain stretching between them. Similar terms are found in other languages, including the Arabic (بَيْن ٱلنَّهْرَيْن‎‎ Bain al-Nahrain). The geographic region became a political one after World War I, with the formation of an Arabic-speaking state, the kingdom of Iraq.

The state of Kuwait is a small emirate located on the northern edge of Eastern Arabia at the tip of the Persian Gulf, nestled between Iraq to the north and Saudi Arabia to the south. The Adventist work in Kuwait began in the early 1950s through Voice of Prophecy (VOP) broadcasts.

The first record of the Levant Union Mission appears in the 1907 SDA Yearbook.

Matariah Mercy Home was an orphanage operated by the Egypt Field of Seventh-day Adventists to provide care for underprivileged village children from 1947 to around 1990.

The Middle East and North Africa Union Mission is attached to the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists in Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A. Formerly known as the Greater Middle East Union Mission, the Middle East and North Africa Union Mission was organized in 2012, renamed in October 2012, and reorganized in 2015. It occupies the following territories: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Western Sahara (Western Sahara is a contested area not universally recognized as a separate country or region), Yemen, and the northern half of Cyprus; comprising the Egypt-Sudan, Gulf, and West Asia Fields; and the East Mediterranean, and North Africa Regions.

The Middle East Division was a church organizational unit from 1951 to 1970.