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Showing 481 – 500 of 516

​Walter Charles Utt, influential Adventist historian, taught for thirty-four years at Pacific Union College (PUC) and chaired the department of history and social studies for all but three of those years.

Emmett Kaiser Vande Vere was a historian, author, educational administrator, history professor, historical consultant to university presidents, and promoter of the narrative interpretation of Adventist history.

The Velvetones Quartet won wide acclaim for its a cappella sound both in and beyond Adventist circles during the 1950s.

​Daniel E. Venden, pastor, teacher, singing evangelist, and conference president, was widely known for his dedication and effectiveness as a Seventh-day Adventist administrator and evangelist.

​Morris L. Venden, Adventist pastor, evangelist, and author, was widely-appreciated for skillful preaching that emphasized the centrality of a vital, personal relationship with Christ. He championed the message of salvation by faith in Christ alone, which he regarded as including justification, sanctification, and glorification.

The Voice of Prophecy (VOP), founded in California by evangelist H.M.S. Richards, Sr. in 1929, became Adventism’s premiere radio ministry, with nationwide broadcasting and a Bible Correspondence School both launched in 1942. By 1947 the VOP was reaching around the world, broadcasting in six languages on more than 600 stations, and its international evangelistic ministry continues in 2020 on multiple media platforms.

Pitt Abraham Wade was an entrepreneurial physician whose endeavors to establish a sanitarium in Colorado during the first decade of the twentieth century entailed substantial interaction with Ellen G. White.

Trula Elizabeth Wade was a pioneer teacher, educator, and residence hall dean at Oakwood College (now a university).

​Richard T. Walden, M.D., was a leading figure in the development of the School of Public Health at Loma Linda University and co-director of the initial Adventist Health Study.

Ira Otto Wallace and his wife, Mary Stivers Wallace, were missionaries, colporteurs, nursing home administrators, and pioneers in establishing the nursing home healthcare industry.

For nearly sixty years, Eric Calvin Ward served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a renowned pastor, evangelist, educator, church builder, and administrator.

​Henry Dana Ward, a Harvard-educated Episcopalian clergyman, authored numerous works on biblical prophecy and became a leading figure in the Millerite movement.

For more than four decades Adell Warren, Sr., served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as the business manager of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama, and Riverside Sanitarium in Nashville, Tennessee.

​Luther Willis Warren, evangelist and youth ministries innovator, influenced the lives of thousands of young people in schools and churches where he conducted revivals. He created organizations such as the Sunshine Bands, Junior and Senior Missionary Volunteer societies, church schools, and orphanages.

Judson S. Washburn was an evangelist, musician, and pastor who was deeply connected by pedigree with the church’s leading pioneers.

​Mabel Branch was the first African American public school teacher in the state of Colorado and she, along with her parents, Thomas and Henrietta Branch, became the first black missionaries sent to Africa by the Seventh-day Adventist church.

The Wedgwood Trio, American folk singers from the South, helped create a greater openness for newer forms of worship music in the Adventist church during the 1960s and 1970s.

​George and Ada Wellman journeyed aboard the Pitcairn to the South Pacific in 1894, undertaking mission work on the islands of Raiatea and Rarotonga before ill health compelled a return to California where both served at the Pacific Press.

​Sterrie Wellman’s church career is distinguished by pioneer mission work in the Caribbean and India followed by lengthy service as an associate secretary of the Sabbath School Department at General Conference headquarters.