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Showing 81 – 100 of 2377

​A pioneer writer and scholar-evangelist, John Nevins Andrews exercised wide influence in the early Seventh-day Adventist church serving alongside James and Ellen White and Joseph Bates as one of the inner circle of leaders involved in founding the movement. He held a variety of important leadership positions including General Conference president, editor of the Review and Herald, and local conference president. He also served as a long-term member of the General Conference Executive Committee.

​John Nevins Andrews, M.D., and Dorothy Spicer Andrews pioneered Adventist mission to the people of Tibet. John was the namesake of his grandfather, John Nevins Andrews (1829-1883), Adventist scholar and first missionary to Europe.

​Celian Emerald Andross was an American evangelist and church administrator who dedicated his life to working for the Adventist Church. Andross held many successful evangelistic meetings in the American West and along the mid-Atlantic before serving as the youth director of the Columbia Union Conference in Maryland for six years.

​Elmer Ellsworth Andross was an evangelist, administrator, educator, author, and missionary. The end of the 19th century was a period of significant losses for the Seventh-day Adventist church with the death of pioneers James White, J. N. Andrews, and Uriah Smith; the apostasies of bright lights such as Albion Fox Ballenger and John Harvey Kellogg, and losses of institutional buildings to fire. This period has also been described as the turning point toward unity, reform, solvency, and ardent evangelism, and Elmer Andross was an integral part of these changes.

Lucy Andrus taught in church schools in Minnesota and Washington State for a decade before giving 16 years of active mission service in China as a teacher and Bible worker.

Arnoldo Oscar Anniehs was a pastor and evangelist in Brazil. His grandfather, Augusto Annies, was one of the first Sabbath keepers in Brazil.

Paul Kwame Owusu Ansah was an Adventist evangelist from Ghana.

Theodore Anthony was a Greek shoemaker, born in Asia Minor and of Turkish speech. He is credited with laying the foundation of Seventh-day Adventism among his people in the Ottoman Empire, and was also instrumental in mission work among the Armenians.

Silvanus Ifechukwu Anuligo was a pastor, church administrator, and a professor emeritus of Theology and Christian Ministry who hailed from Nnewi, Anambra State of Nigeria, which is under the present-day Eastern Nigeria Union Conference.

Isaías Apolinário, businessman and patron, was born September 28, 1917, in Taubaté city, São Paulo state.

Pedro Apolinario, teacher and volunteer pastor, was born April 7, 1919, in Tremembe, Sao Paulo.

Jairo Tavares de Araujo, minister, educator, and administrator, was born in 1916 in the city of Timbauba, state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

Bender Lawton Archbold was the first native born Inter-American to be president of the Inter-American Division of Seventh-day Adventists, serving from 1970 to 1980, the decade when the division became the fastest growing and the largest of the SDA world divisions. He was also a renowned preacher, dean of men, teacher, academy principal, departmental director, and administrator.

Nikolai Mikhailovich Arefyev served the Seventh-day Adventist Church as a pastor and administrator in the city of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg, Russia) in the 1920s and 1930s.

Júlio Miñán Ares, canvasser, pastor, evangelist, and manager, was born September 17, 1897, in the city of La Coruña, in the state of Galiza, Spain.

Keith Argraves was an American Seventh-day Adventist who gained fame among Adventists church members during World War II as a medic in the United States Army’s 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment and for surviving internment as a prisoner of war in Italy and Germany.

José Antonio Argueta Pérez was a layman, master guide, youth leader, church builder, and community worker.

​Rufino Serapio Arismendi was an important figure in the expansion of the Adventist message among the indigenous people of the territory of Gran Sabana during the twentieth century. He served as a pastor and administrator in the Colombo-Venezuela Union Mission.

​James Awurade Miezah Arloo was one of the first seven ministers ordained in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Ghana, and one of the pioneering Adventist workers in the country.

Mary Mortensen Tripp Armitage was a Bible worker, foster mother to Ellen White’s granddaughters, and pioneer missionary to Africa.