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Showing 121 – 140 of 4010

The Adventist Medical Center (Okinawa Medical Center) is a 48-bed medical institution at Nishihara, Okinawa, owned and operated by the Japan Union Conference.

From its humble beginnings in 1948 as a rented two-story house, known as Lakeside Clinic in Marawi City, to a 130-bed capacity DOH-recognized secondary level hospital, Adventist Medical Center-Iligan has overcome many challenges to achieve its current success.

Adventist Medical Center–Valencia (AMCV, formerly Casuga Medical-Surgical Clinic) is a non-stock, non-profit faith-based healthcare facility located at A. Aguilar Street, Poblacion, Valencia City, dedicated to providing optimum quality care to all clients in Valencia City, Bukidnon, and nearby municipalities. It is one of the five medical institutions in Mindanao operated by the South Philippine Union Conference (SPUC).

​Inisa Community Medical Centre, which became Adventist Medical Centre in 2007, started medical services in the early 1950s and was one of the early clinics/hospitals in the western region of Nigeria. It has made significant impacts on the Inisa community and other neighboring towns and villages.

​Following the government restrictions on the activities of Adventists in Nandi, Kenya, between 1932 and 1963, the Adventists there relied on the Missionary Volunteer Societies to make up for the absence of formal Adventist schools in the region.

The development of indigenous Adventist music in Ghana dates from 1922, the year in which the Agona Seventh-day Adventist Singing Band was organized in Agona-Ashanti led by one Mr. Tenkorang. It was the first indigenous singing group in Adventist circles that used the indigenous language of the Akan people, Twi, in their singing. The formation of this singing band drew its inspiration from the Methodist Church which already had singing bands that assisted in its evangelistic efforts.

​One of the most effective methods of conveying Seventh-day Adventist teachings in the early decades of the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s growth in the Caribbean was the pioneering of early Adventist songs and hymns. Music has always been an effective vehicle to transmit ideas and ideologies. Early colporteurs and ministers both taught their first contacts and interested people the early Adventist music that they had learned from their mentors. The early Adventists who viewed themselves as “a singing people” had memorized numerous songs about their beliefs, which they shared with new converts.

​The Adventist Natural Life Clinic and Spa is an institution that is part of the Adventist Health System, located in the territory of the Central Brazil Union Conference. The goal of this clinic is to offer specialized programs for disease prevention and health recovery through lifestyle education.

The first Adventist magazines reached Russia by the close of the nineteenth century. They were printed in the German language in Germany and Switzerland, secretly transported across the border, and distributed mostly among Russian citizens of German origin who lived at that time in the Volga region, Transcaucasia, and Central Asia. Given a high demand for the Adventist message among the Russian-speaking population, there emerged a necessity to publish an Adventist magazine in Russian. In 1905 the publication of the Maslina (“Olive”) Magazine started in Hamburg.

The news agency APD (Adventist Press Service – Adventistischer Pressedienst) was founded in Basel in 1974 on the initiative of the journalist Christian Bernhard Schäffler. He remained its director and editor-in-chief until 2010. Since the expansion and repositioning of the press service as a news agency in 2004, “APD Switzerland” has become an integral part of the media world in the German-speaking countries. The agency is based in Basel. APD® is the legally protected abbreviation of the name in German: “Adventistischer Pressedienst”.

Adventist Professional was a journal produced by the Association of Business and Professional Men in Australia beginning in 1989

​Adventist Publishing House (Madagascar) (Imprimerie Adventiste, Trano Pirinty Advantista) was established in 1930 at Ambohijatovo, Antananarivo, Madagascar, and is owned and operated by the Indian Ocean Union Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.

Adventist Record is self-identified, on its website, as the “official news magazine of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific.

The first immigrants reached by the young Advent movement in North America were French, German, and Norwegian-speaking persons in the mid-west and Canada in 1857. More recently, in June 2009 the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists created Adventist Refugee and Immigrant Ministries (ARIM) that specifically focuses on coordinating and directing the work of more than eighteen language-specific refugee and immigrant groups in North America. Beyond the organized institutions of the Seventh-day Adventist church, two independent ministries have taken active roles in refugee ministry: Adventist Frontier Missions and ASAP Ministries (Advocates for Southeast Asians and the Persecuted).

Witchcraft is generally perceived to be an integral element of the African worldview and cultural practices. This continues to be the case, to some extent, even in the modern Zambian culture and society.

In the post-World War II era the number of Seventh-day Adventist retirement villages in the South Pacific Division has steadily increased.

Adventist School Bouchrieh (ASB) is a coeducational day school operated by the East Mediterranean Region of the Middle East and North Africa Union Mission. Following the education ideals of the Seventh-day Adventist church, it offers four levels of education (kindergarten to secondary) and is accredited by the Lebanese Ministry of Education.

Adventist School Mouseitbeh (ASM) is a coeducational day school operated by the East Mediterranean Region of the Middle East and North Africa Union Mission. Following the educational ideals of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, it offers four levels of education (kindergarten to secondary) and is accredited by the Lebanese Ministry of Education.

​The Adventist Technology Institute (IATec) (El Instituto Tecnológico Adventista) is a technology development and support institution of the Seventh-day Adventist Church managed by the South American Division. Its headquarters is located in Hortolândia, state of São Paulo, Brazil.

The Adventist Student associations in the South Pacific Division give opportunity for Adventist students to support one other through conventions, camp meetings, and outreach events. Approximately 20,000 students across the Division are involved.