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Showing 121 – 140 of 2966

​Levirate marriage is still practiced among the various African tribes in including, in Tanzania, the Luo, Pare, Hehe, Sukuma tribes. The unique struggles of the Adventist Church in its endeavors to evangelize these groups is discussed in this article.

The Luo are a Nilotic ethnic group that is spread out in East and Central Africa. Most of them inhabit the shores and the environs of Lake Victoria in Kenya and Tanzania. Adventism among the Luo of Kenya is over a century old, tracing its roots to the missionary activities of Arthur Carscallen and Peter Nyambo, who arrived at Kendu Bay in the eastern shores of Lake Victoria in November 1906.

​The Maasai people live in the southern part of Kenya and northern part of Tanzania in east Africa. It is estimated that one million Maasai people live in Kenya and Tanzania, although most Maasai doubt these numbers. Many Maasai see the national census as government meddling and often miscount their numbers to census takers. This tribe is well known for being strong in preserving its culture.

The Adventist Church in Kenya survived numerous trials during the Mau Mau uprising (1952-1960).

Alfredo Aeschlimann, pastor, administrator, educator, served in the Austral Union Conference, Antillean Union, Mexico Union and Inter-American Division.

​The Africa Herald Publishing House is a Seventh-day Adventist publishing house based in Kendu Bay on the shores of Lake Victoria in Western Kenya.

The Afro-Mideast Division was a large unit of church organization in the Middle East and eastern Africa that existed from 1970 to 1981.

Afro-Mideast Division Impact was a periodical that served as the official organ of the Afro-Mideast Division from 1971 to 1981.

​The Adventist message reached Burundi in 1925. As part of the Adventist Church’s efforts to reach all the regions in Burundi with the message of salvation, Agakiza Radio Station broadcasted its first program in 2007.

​Eugene Theodore Agard was a physicist and Seventh-day Adventist exemplar for creationism.

​Agbedigue Kodjo Raphael, the first Togolese pioneer and Adventist evangelist, was born in 1942 in the village of Kolo-Mésiwobe (south of Togo).

David Narter Agboka was among the first native Ghanain ministers and evangelists in Ghana.

​David Toyebi Agboola was a pastor, administrator, and published author from Nigeria.

​Agro-Industrial Adventist Trans-Amazon Academy (Instituto Adventista Transamazonico Agro-Industrial or IATAI) is an elementary and high school academy which offers both day school and boarding school. It belongs to the Seventh-day Adventist Church and is part of the Adventist worldwide educational network.

Emil J. Åhrén was a preacher, editor, and author from Sweden.

Wilfred Jonathan Airey was a renowned Adventist educator and an active participant in public institutions for higher education.

​John Aitken was the manager of the Avondale Press for thirteen years between 1909 and 1922. He trained many to operate a press and they in turn operated presses throughout the countries of the Australasian Union Conference.

George Hillry Akers was a lifelong educator and administrator for the Seventh-day Adventist educational system.

​Reuben Agboola Akintunde was a pastor, administrator, and evangelist from Nigeria.

Formerly part of South East Conference, Akwa Ibom Conference was organized in 2015. It is overseen by Eastern Nigeria Union Conference in the West-Central Africa Division of Seventh-day Adventists.